(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Two reunions of the 142d Regiment, Pa. Vols. : including a history of the regiment, a description of the Battle of Gettysburg, also a complete roster of the regiment"

NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 07952791 1 



B-32:" 



upo 



\a^9^ , 



\ 0. . 



11-, 



A'ri 




T=. 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRAKT 



ABTOR, LENOX AND 

TILDEN fOUNDATIONP 

R ^ 



" "the Is^EW YOR«^ 
PUBLIC LTBRAKY 



AStbR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 







A. D. 1S65. 



TWO REUNIONS 



i42d Regiment, Pa. Vols 



INCLUDING 



A HISTORY OF THE REGIMENT, DEDICATION OF 

THE MONUMENT, A DESCRIPTION OF 

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, 



A COMPLETE ROSTER OF THE REGIMENT, 



Bv Col. HORATIO N. WARREN. 



L^ p. U KF ALD, N. Y. : 

THE COURIER COMPANY, PRINTERS. 



I 690. 



TOT NEW TORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 
874442A 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 

Jl 1037 L 



PREFACE. 



nPHE object to be attained in the publication of this book, 
as decideci by the surviving members of the One Hundred 
and Forty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, at their reunion 
at Gettysburg, Pa., September ii, 1889, was to have in the 
'X famil}- of each member of the regiment, who would sub- 
AK scribe for the same, a complete roster of the regiment, with 
a short history of its honorable service, including an account 
of our two reunions, believing that such a book will be 
^ "^ treasured b)^ our children, families and friends, when we 
) shall have joined that great army of our comrades, who 

gave their lives for the Union and in suppressing the most 
gigantic rebellion recorded in history. The records of the 
War Department show that there were only two regiments 
in the service of the Union army whose percentage of 
losses sustained by reason of their participation in the bat- 
tles for the Union will exceed those of the One Hundred 
and Forty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers. Nine hundred 
and thirty-five men and officers were enlisted. Eight hun- 
dred and eleven of them were killed, wounded and taken 
prisoners during their term of service, which commenced in 
August, 1862, and ended when peace was declared in the 
year 1865. 



CONTENTS 



Page. 

FIRST REUNION, 7 

Address of Cot.. H. N. Warkkn 7 

Survivors ok thk One Hundred and Fortv-Second Regiment, . jo 

SECOND REUNION 13 

History of the Regiment, by Coi.. H. N. W.'XRren, 14 

Dedication of Monument, 45 

Address of Col. H. N. Warren, 47 

Address of Capt. George R. Snowden, 48 

Address of Private James E. MacLane, 54 

Address of Lieut. John V. Miller 58 

Address of Private D. J. Horner, 60 

Inscription on Monumknt 61 

ROSTER OF THE ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND 

REGIMENT, PA. VOLS., 63 

APPENDIX, 85 

Description of the B.-vttle of Gettysburg 87 

The Valley of the Shadow of Death 116 

John Burns of .Gettysburg, 118 

Battle Hymn of the Republic 121 

Red, White and Blue, 122 

Barbara P"RiErcHiE, 123 

Marchinc; Through Georgia 125 

Sheridan's Ride 126 

Scott and the Veteran, 128 

Tenting on the Old Camp-Ground, 129 

Thk Star-Spangled Banner, 130 

The Sword of Bunker Hill, 131 

The Battle-Cry of Freedom, 132 

The Common Chord 133 

A Warrior Bold, 134 



VI CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX : Page. 

"Yes, I'm Guilty," 135 

Our Two Opinions, 137 

America 138 

Ode for Decoration Day 139 

Speed Away 141 

Old Oaken Bucket, 142 

Annie Laurie, 143 

Banty Tim, 143 

Louisiana Lowlands, 145 

Kingdom Coming, 146 

Old Folks at Home, 147 

What are the Wild Waves Saying? 148 

Home, Sweet Home 14S 

The Jiners, 149 

Auld Lang Syne, 152 



FIRST REUNION 



HELD AT 



G E T T Y S B U R G, J U L Y I , I 8 8 



IN accordance with previous notice, a Reunion of the Sur- 
vivors of the I42d Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers 
was held at 1 1 o'clock A. M., in the historic grove adjoining the 
Seminary building. A remnant of about thirty veterans of 
the regiment assembled, and was joined by several members of 
the I2ist Regiment, which fought by the side of the I42d on 
that memorable ist of July, 1863. 

On motion of Captain George R. Snowden, of Company I 
(now Brigadier-General in command of the ist Brigade 
National Guard of Pennsylvania), Colonel Horatio N. Warren, 
who was promoted to the command of the regiment after 
the resignation of Lieutenant-Colonel McCalmont, was made 
Chairman of the meeting, and First Sergeant John J. 
Hoffman, of Company C, was chosen Secretary. 

On taking the chair. Colonel Warren delivered an eloquent 
and touching address, which was warmly received and fre- 
quently applauded. 

Address of Col. H. N. Warren. 

Comrades: It is with many pleasurable emotions and a 
grateful heart to the Ruler of the Universe, that I am permitted, 
after the lapse of a quarter of a century, and under the present 
auspices, to look once again into the honest and brave faces of men 
whose associations with me during three years of a bloody and 
cruel war, make me realize and fully understand, beyond the per- 
adventure of a doubt, that all of them are my friends, are the 



8 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

friends of my country, strong and true, having been over a score 
of times under a hot fire, and never found wanting. 

The trials and tribulations through which we passed during 
those three long years from 1862 to 1865, in my mind were calcu- 
lated to build up in our hearts a kindly feeling for each other that 
time can never efface, and death alone destroy. 

Qur meeting here to-day, my comrades, possibly more than to 
any like number of men among the many thousands who will 
congregate upon this wide, world-renowned battle-field, is of great 
significance, because to us it has a two-fold meaning. 

This is the anniversary of Gettysburg, where was fought the 
greatest battle that was ever waged in the western hemisphere, if 
not in the world, and in which from its inception the old i42d 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, of which we are the living represen- 
tatives, took an active and honorable part, as her long list of killed 
and wounded and our terribly depleted ranks told, after the smoke 
of battle had cleared away, and we halted for a few hours to 
sorrowfully bury our dead, care for our wounded, and sum up the 
results of the terrible carnage made necessary for our victory. 

We are not here to-day to exult over that victory, for we realize 
that the quarter of a century that has sped away on the wings of 
time since then, has to a great extent wiped out the bitter feeling 
we then entertained towards our southern brothers ; and we believe 
to-day that a large proportion of those men still living, who were 
against us then, are now lovers of the old Union, and are favorably 
inclined to rejoice with us that at Gettysburg, Pa., the tide of Lee's 
invasion was checked, the backbone of the rebellion broken, and 
that it was also here that Secession lost her grip ; and here, upon 
this sacred soil, made memorable because of the sacrifice of so 
many precious lives, I hesitate not to believe that now, with us, 
they would be willing to register a vow that the old Union, 
organized and established by our forefathers, north and south, has 
been made stronger and more enduring by reason of the sacrifice 
it took to perpetuate its existence. 

This is our first reunion. We are here, comrades, to renew our 
friendships, and to form a fraternal society among those of us who 
live, that will be instrumental in bringing us together occasionally, 
and in renewing the old love that was born while we marched 
shoulder to shoulder, perpetuate a loving memory of the comrades 
who gave up their lives on our country's altar, and of those of our 
number who have since those days passed over the river to their 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 9 

long homes, towanls which we are all speeding so rapidly. If we 
accomplish this, I am sure it will he a great source of pleasure to 
us in our declining years, and teach our children loyalty to the flag 
which is so precious to each one of us, that whenever our eyes rest 
upon its beautiful folds, an inexpressible feeling comes over us, 
causing our blood to course through our veins more rapidly — at 
least, comrades, this is so with me. 

I am too thoroughly delighted by reason of our meeting to-day, 
to continue to any length. The old i42d Pennsylvania Volunteers 
has a record which none of us need be ashamed of. Enlisted in 
June and July, 1S62, it was organized as a regiment in August 
following, sent to the front immediately after its organization, 
remained there in active service until General Lee at Appomattox 
surrendered to General Grant, which virtually ended the war. As 
my memory serves me, I will name the battles in which we partici- 
pated, in their regular order : 

1. Fredericksburgh, Va., Dec. 3. 1862. 14. Cold Harbor. 

2. Burnside Mud March. 15. Petersburgh, i8th of June, and under 

3. Chancellorsville. fire every day for three months. 

4. Gettysburg, Pa. 16. Weldon Railroad. 

5. Frankstown, Md. 17. Hatcher's Run. 

6. Thoroughfare Gap, Va. 18. Chapin Farm. 

7. Rappahannock Station. 19. Hatcher's Run. 

8. Meade's Retrograde Movement. 20. Dabney's Mill. 

9. Wilderness. 21. Weldon Railroad Raid. 

10. Laurel Hill. 22. Fort Steadman. 

11. Spottsylvania. 23. Five Forks. 
12 Tolopotomy Creek. 24. Appomattox. 
13. North Anna River. 

Now, comrades, when I have related to you a few incidents of 
the war which came under my immediate observation, and have 
stamped themselves indelibly on my mind, I shall give way to some 
one who will doubtless interest you more than I am able to, speaking 
in public not being one of my accomplishments. 

Before me I see a man whose locks have been silvered by the 
ruthless march of time. Seeing his face carries me back to the first 
of July, 1863. He was a boy then, just verging into manhood, 
brave and strong, a patriot indeed. On yonder hill, back of the 
Seminary, where the battle waxed warm and the deadly missiles 
from the well-aimed muskets of the swarming multitude in front, 
outnumbering us four to one, dealt to our ranks death and destruc- 
tion on every side, our noble old Colonel, with hundreds of others, 



lO 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



had fallen; the remnant of the column was retreating towards the 
Seminary, and three or four of them, faithful to their old com- 
mander, endeavored to carry his lifeless body along ; but the 
enemy was too close. Several of the boys were shot dead while 
trying to perform this solemn duty. One was left, and seeing the 
impossibility to accomplish this purpose himself, he unbuckled the 
Colonel's belt and came off the field, swinging the Colonel's sword, 
not, however, escaping being wounded ; for, as he passed me, the 
blood was streaming out of his mouth, and the tears down his 
cheeks. But with the courage of an infuriated lion, he was swear- 
ing eternal vengeance on our enemies. 

When I was made commander of the regiment, I selected this 
boy for a position of trust. In every battle after, he was near our 
colors. At Dabney's Mill the entire color guard and sergeant, with 
the exception of him, were killed or wounded. I thought they 
were perhaps exposing themselves needlessly, and I took hold of 
the colors, intending to look after them myself while the engage- 
ment lasted, but this brave boy would not have it so. " Not until 
I am dead shall any man carry these colors, unless you insist with 
a peremptory order. Wherever you say, they shall go ; but let me 
carry them until I die." And as "fortune favors the brave," he 
carried them to the Appomattox. 

At the close of the address a roll of those present was 
made out, and the following survivors answered to their 
names: 



Colonel Horatio N. Warren. 
1st Lieut. W. L. Wilson, Adjutant. 
Corporal Beriah Orr, Co. A. 
Lieutenant D. S. Tinsman, Co. B. 
1st Sergeant J. J. Hoffman, Co. C. 
Private D. J. Hornek, Co. C. 
Private Jacob Zufal, Co. C. 
Lieutenant N. S. Miller, Co. D. 
1st Sergeant O. P. Shaver, Co. D. 
Private William Rogers, Co. D. 
Private Henry J. Miller, Co. D. 
Private John W. Dickey, Co. D. 
Private J. J. Swank, Co. D. 
Private Harrison Lohr, Co. D. 
Private John H. Bissell, Co. D. 



Sergeant J. V. Miller, Co. E. 
Captain Albert Heffley, Co. F. 
Lieutenant J. G. Gordill, Co. F. 
Musician C. A. Fi-Ato, Co. F. 
Corporal Benjamin Hay, Co. F. 
Private S. T. Fisher, Co. F. 
Private Josei'h Walker, Co. F. 
Private F. B. Collins, Co. F. 
Private Edwin Burch, Co. G. 
Captain George R. Snowden, Co. L 
Private Jere Walden, Co. I. 
Private W. J. Sheriff, Co. L 
Private James E. MacLane, Co. L 
Lieutenant J. W. DissiNGER, Co. K. 
Private John R. Davies, Co. K. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. I I 

Captain Snowden, of Compan}' I, then bricfl}- addressed 
the veterans, and as he referred in glowing and pathetic 
terms to the gallant and heroic Colonel Cuniinins and other 
brave comrades, who yielded up their lives in the terrible 
conflict of that bloody field, the tears of this little band of 
battle-scarred soldiers fell upon the same soil that was made 
sacred by the blood of their comrades twenty-five years 
before. 

Corporal J. V. Miller, of Company E, Adjutant Wilson 
and others, also made some appropriate remarks. 

One of the objects of the meeting being the location of 
the site for a monument to the regiment, it was resolved, 
on motion of Captain Snowden, to place the monument in 
the front line of the First Corps during the battle of the 
first day, and that a committee of five, to select the location 
and st)'le of the same, be appointed. Whereupon the chair 
announced the following as the committee : 

Captain George R*. Snowden, Company I. 
Adjutant W. L. WiLSON. Sergeant J. V. Miller, Company E. 

Corporal Berlmi Orr, Company A. Private D. J- Horner, Company C. 

On motion, a permanent organization of the regiment 
was formed, and Colonel Warren was elected permanent 
President, and Sergeant Hoffman, Secretar}- and Treasurer. 

The place and time for holding the next reunion were 
then discussed, and finally fixed for Gettysburg, Jul}' ist, 
1890. 

A cordial invitation was extended to the members of 
the 12 1st Regiment to join the regiment at its next reunion. 

Representatives of the different companies present were 
requested to furnish the Secretary with a list of the names 
and post-office addresses of all the survivors of their re- 
spective companies, so that he might be enabled to notify 
each survivor of the action of this meeting. It was suggested 



12 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SFXOND REGIMENT. 

that small contributions be made to defray printing and other 
necessary expenses, and the sum of $14.60 was placed in the 
hands of the Treasurer for that purpose. 

The little band of soldiers then accompanied the Com- 
mittee on Monument over the ground the regiment occupied 
during the first day's fight, and the committee, with the 
approval of all present, located the monument on the south 
side of Reynold's Avenue, in a line with, and nearly midway 
between, the monuments of the I2ist and 151st Pennsylvania 
Volunteers. 

The design of the monument will be selected, and the 
contract for its erection awarded as soon as possible, as it is 
intended to have it ready for dedication on the 3d of October 
next. 

Before separating it was proposed that the members meet 
in the Diamond of the town at 4.30 P. m., and join the pro- 
cession of the Association of the Army of the Potomac, from 
that point to the National Cemetery, to witness the exercises 
of the reunion of the " Blue and the Gray." 

The meeting then adjourned to July i, 1890. The utmost 
harmony and good feeling prevailed throughout, and the occa- 
sion was one never to be forgotten by those who participated 
in this first reunion of the regiment. 

John J. Hoffman, Hora'iio N. Warren, 

Secretary. President. 



SECOND REUNION 



Gettysburg, September ii, 1889. 



ON the afternoon of September loth, about one hundred 
of the Survivors of the I42d Pennsylvania Volunteers 
met in Grand Army Hall, at Gettysburg, to arrange a pro- 
gramme for our Reunion and Dedication to take place Sep- 
tember I ith. 

The meeting was called to order by the President, Col. 
H.N. Warren, who in a few timely remarks extended to the 
comrades a cordial greeting, and then called upon Comrade 
Brown, of Company H, to lead the audience in singing our 
national anthem, " My Country 'Tis of Thee," in which all 
of the veterans heartily participated. This done, remarks 
were made by Adjutant Wilson, Lieutenant Gilson, Sergeant 
Hoffman, Captain Heffley, Captain Dushane, and quite a 
number of the comrades present, when we adjourned to meet 
and form the regiment at 9 a. M., on the morning of the iith, 
on the square in front of the McClellan House, and march to 
the grove back of the Seminary, and there hold our reunion 
on the ground made sacred to us all by the many losses we 
there sustained July ist, 1863. 

At the hour appointed, on the morning of the iith, the 
regiment was promptly formed, and nearly two hundred strong 
marched to the grove in the rear of the Seminary. 

Comrade MacLane, of Company I, having brought his 
camera with him, desired to take a picture of the regiment. 



14 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

which he accompHshed satisfactorily after the regiment was 
thrown into columns by divisions ; this ended, the comrades 
listened to a short history of the regiment, when they voted 
almost unanimousl)' for the publication of the same. 

History of the Regiment by Col. H. N. Warren. 

Comrades : On the afternoon of July 2d, 1888, in this hallowed 
grove, the first reunion of the i42d Pennsylvania Volunteers was 
held, and a permanent organization for all of its surviving members 
entered into. Pursuant to a resolution then adopted, by the provi- 
dence of an all-wise Ruler, I am here to-day to try and fulfill the 
requirements of a request of the comrades present upon that occa- 
sion, which was to recite to you that might assemble here to-day a 
short history of the old regiment and the part it took in the sup- 
pression of the most gigantic rebellion recorded in history, known 
as the war of 1861-65. 

The regiment' was composed of ten companies of Pennsylvania 
volunteers (see Roster page 63), numbering, all told, officers and 
men, about 925 able-bodied men. We had all been mustered into 
the United States service for three years, or during the war, in the 
month of August, 1862. On the first of September a regimental 
organization was effected by the choice of the following : 

Robert P. Cummins, of Somerset County, as Colonel. 

At FRED B. McCalmont, of Venango County, as Lieut. -Colonel. 

John Bradley, of Lucerne County, as Major. 

W. L. Wilson, of Lucerne County, as Adjutant. 

William C. Hillman, of Mercer County, as Quartermaster. 

Thomas J. Keeley, of Philadelphia, as .Surgeon. 

On the following day after its organization the regiment was 
ordered to \A'ashington, arriving there just as the wounded were 
coming in from the second battle of Bull Run. Few of us had ever 
seen the distinguished place before,' and the dome of the great 
Capitol building rose up before us in great splendor as we entered 
the city and helped materially in driving away the gripings with 
which many of us were afflicted, and which it was quite necessary 
we should shake off, now that we were approaching the scene where 
■we first expected our valor and courage to be tried. We learned 
from the wounded, who were flocking into the city, that the Army 
of the Potomac had been put to flight, and most severely handled 



ONK HUNDRED AND FOKTV-SECOND REGIMENT. 15 

on the identical ground where the great struggle in dead earnest 
first began. Many of these wounded comrades were disheartened, 
and some demoralized, and we did all we could to inspire them and 
ourselves with a feeling that victory for our side was not far distant, 
for we were "coming, Father Abraham, 300,000 strong." Instead 
of being ordered immediately into battle, as many of us anticipated, 
we were marched out about four miles near the Maryland line, 
where we were ordered into camp. Shovels and picks were fur- 
nished and soon the whole command was busily engaged throwing 
up earth-works, the main portion of which was named, when com- 
pleted, Fort Massachusetts. 

We were told that an attack was expected on Washington in our 
front, and every precaution was used to make our position a formid- 
able one. The first night we were there, after digging hard all day, 
as commandant of Company A, I was summoned to the Colonel's 
quarters and informed that I was detailed to take my company and 
go on picket for the next twenty-four hours ; that a regular officer 
would report shortly and go with and designate to me the line for 
me to guard. We began to realize then that there was not much 
play about that kind of soldiering. The officer came and led us out 
the road about one mile, then helped me station my men so as to 
cover the road and each side of it about one-third of a mile. I was 
informed our position was a very important one — that at any mo- 
ment the cavalry attached to the troops commanded by Stonewall 
Jackson might dash in and capture my whole force, if we did not 
keep a sharp look-out, and in case such a thing did occur, and we 
did not make the necessary resistance to put our forces in the forts 
and works on their guard, the most serious results might be ex- 
pected. This was our first picket duty, and, as yet, some of my 
men scarcely knew how to load a musket, and, while there may not 
have been an enemy within twenty miles, we could peer out into 
the darkness in our front and, in our imagination, see long lines of 
the enemy marching and counter-marching and getting ready to 
sweep us from the face of the earth. If my memory serves me, 
most of us were tired and weary, but — sleep ! well, we had no use 
for sleep that evening, the responsibilities of war was crowding in 
upon us too fast for any of us to think of closing our eyes in slum- 
ber. We all wished we had eyes behind as well as in front, so we 
could see the enemy whichever way he might come, for we were so 
green we hardl}' knew what to make of our perilous situation. After 
we returned to camp and learned how far we were from the enemy, 



l6 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

we did not make mention of our perilous service, for until then we 
supposed we were the outposts nearest the victorious army of Lee. 

The next day, while digging in the trenches about this fort, the 
Army of the Potomac marched out past us into Maryland to meet 
the enemy at South Mountain and Antietam. They presented any- 
thing but an inspiring appearance, their clothes old and dirty and 
their general make-up tired and careworn from their long marches 
and recent defeats. We all wondered if that was the glory, or real- 
istic picture we would present after one year in the service of our 
Uncle Samuel. The head of the column had passed out of our sight 
about twenty-four hours, when we could hear the distant booming 
of artillery. We all agreed that " Little Mac," as the boys called 
him, had either run against a " Sonewall," a "Hill," or had come 
suddenly upon a barricaded " Longstreet," and, in consequence 
thereof, was letting loose his " dogs of war." We expected momen- 
tarily orders to join them in the shortest possible route and sup- 
posed, of course, in our next experience we should realize what it 
was to participate in a general engagement. Fate, however, de- 
creed otherwise, and at about the end of six days we were ordered 
to Frederick City, Md., to help care for the wounded from the bat- 
tle-fields of South Mountain and Antietam, where our army, to a 
certain extent, had been victorious, though severely punished in 
accomplishing the same. 

We were engaged in this duty about ten days, and were I to spin 
out and make plain in words the horrible results of these battles, as 
we saw them and heard of them from the mouths of those that were 
sent there, shattered and torn in every conceivable shape by bullets 
and shells (both our friends and our enemies, for from us, in this 
their non-combative state, they all received the same treatment), I 
am quite certain that none would disagree with the conclusions we 
there came to, namely, that war, indeed, was more terrible in its 
consequences than we had ever before been able to realize. When 
our next orders came we found our column marching toward Antie- 
tam, where we joined the Army of the Potomac, and on the twenty- 
sixth day of October (which was Sunday and the birthday of your 
historian), with this grand old army we made our first day's march, 
and well you must all remember the day, for it never ceased pour- 
ing rain from early morning, when we started, until ten o'clock that 
night, when it changed into sleet and snow, as we halted for the 
night at the base of a mountain. I might add here that none of us 
were particularly overjoyed with this our first introduction to actual 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. \y 

service. During this night we had half of our men carrying rails 
with which we made fires to keep warm by and try to dry our 
clothes. Companies would go out, turn about, and by morning all 
the rail fences for miles had been appropriated and used up. 

The next morning we resumed our march, passing over this bar- 
ren mountain, and at night camped at Berlin, a short distance from 
Harper's Ferry. We remained here a day or two and were supplied 
with rations and forty rounds each of ammunition, and then crossed 
the Potomac river and started on our long march towards Fred- 
ericksburgli, \'a. This march was fraught with much that was try- 
ing to our experience, for, as yet, our men knew nothing about 
foraging, little about cooking and less about taking care of and 
dispensing their rations, so as to spin them out and make them last 
until another issue. In consequence of this, half of the time we 
were nearly starved. One instance I remember in my own personal 
experience that occurred about this time which I will relate: ^^'e had 
been marching hard all day and I was tired and very hungry. Just 
before halting for the night we passed a house and I stopped and 
purchased from a Virginia lady two chickens, about the only living 
things she had left on her farm. She sold them to me, I suppose, 
because she thought if she did not I would steal them. Well, I had 
them nicety picked and cleaned, and, though as hungry as a wolf, I 
determined to keep them for the morrow's march. That evening 
two friends from an old regiment that had then been in the army 
nearly a year came over to visit me and see how I was standing the 
campaign. I had a pleasant visit and was glad of their call and 
the counsel they gave me. Soon an orderly summoned me to the 
Colonel's quarters. I excused myself, saying I would be gone but 
a moment, for them not to go until I returned. I was away possibly 
ten minutes. When 1 returned my visitors had gone, and when I 
looked for my chickens to put them under my head, where I thought 
would be a save place for them until morning, behold ! they had 
also vanished. This taught me a lesson, and ever after I always knew 
that if any old soldier friends came to visit me, and I had any- 
thing choice in eatables or drinkables, and I wished to keep them, I 
must double my guard and give instructions to shoot before they 
challenged. 

At one place on this march we halted for a day at a place the 
boys named Starvation Hollow, and as General Meade rode by our 
division, the men shouted ''crackers and hard-tack" so loud and 
long at him, in his wrath he ordered the whole division under arms 



l8 ONE HUNDRED AND FOKTV-SECOND REGIMENT. 

and made them stand in the rain for about two hours. At Berk's 
Station provisions came up and our hunger was thoroughly ap- 
peased. Here we camped for a few days, getting ready for the 
great battle of Fredericksburgh, Va., which commenced December 
13, 1862, in which we were severely chastised, by being compelled 
to retire from the field with a loss to our regiment of 270 men, 
killed, wounded and missing. Here, my comrades, let me say, is 
where our first genuine experience of war commenced — here is 
where we passed the first ordeal that was calculated to try men's 
souls— here is where we heard the first rattle of musketry and knew 
and realized that the leaden missiles, screaming past our ears, com- 
ing directly from the muzzles of well-aimed muskets, in the hands 
of our common enemy, must deal death and destruction to our 
ranks, and summon many a good friend and comrade to lay his life 
upon the altar of his country and manfully meet his God. 

This battle we lost, and while now we can realize that it was 
doubtless the will of Almighty God that the encounter should ter- 
minate as it did, I have, nevertheless, always felt the blame for the 
defeat was the result of jealousy and the improper use of the troops 
composing the left grand division of our army. Had the general 
commanding the left grand division, with troops which he had in 
reserve, which were in numbers quite sufficiently adequate, sent to 
the support of our division, commanded by General Meade, when 
we charged the enemy and broke their lines, I have no doubt the 
issue of the entire battle would have been changed, and we should 
have won a victory. But this was not to be, the troops in reserve 
were massed on the flats below us, and we were left alone, until 
forced by a far superior force under Stonewall Jackson to retrace 
our steps precipitately, and what was left of us formed in rear of 
our batteries, from which point we had first started to make the 
charge. Had the reserved divisions of troops followed us, I have 
no doubt we could have forced the Confederates to have changed 
their front and thus lose the great advantage of their strong 
defenses along the Fredericksburgh heights, and with our army, 
which was in every way splendidly equipped for battle, I believe 
the day would have been ours. 

I need not say to you, comrades, that late that night, when we 
crossed back over the Rappahannock river, that during our whole 
term of service of three years and the participation in over a score 
of hard-fought battles, with all the accessories thereto, I do not 
recollect of ever feeling so discouraged over the result of anything 



ONE FIUNDRED AND FOKTY-SKCOND REGIMENT. I9 

we ever undertook to do, as I did over the result of this our first 
engagement. 

With an army in active service, soldiers often e.xperience much 
distress for being obliged to expose themselves unnecessarily to 
hardships for the good of which they nor any one can see any pos- 
sible excuse. For example, on this night in December, when we 
crossed back over the river, it was quite cold and rainy and we were 
formed in line of battle along the banks of the river and compelled 
to remain there until late the next morning, instead of being 
marched up on high land a short distance back from the river, 
where we could have been more comfortable and escaped the fear- 
ful shelling we received from the enemy's batteries on the heights, 
as soon as daylight dawned and they discovered our position after 
the retreat we had made during the night. Many times officers in 
high authority deserved censure for not looking more to the interest 
of the commands over which they were placed, when from their 
superiors they received praise, but from the rank and file curses 
and denunciations, for they knew whereof they spoke. 

But I must hasten, for I fear I shall tire you with details which 
will not interest you, and unless I skip a great deal of our experi- 
ence, my history will be too long before I shall have occasion to 
bring you to a point where victory perched on our banners and 
where the sun, which to us had been dark so long, began to shine 
with brightness upon our cause, and renew and strengthen our 
faith in the belief that behind all the dark clouds that had over- 
shadowed us there was a silver lining, and that, sooner or later, the 
justice of our cause would be vindicated. 

The time had now come for us to go into winter quarters, which 
we did near Belle Plain, Va., and from this time until February noth- 
ing of interest occurred, and our time was mostly spent in drill and 
picket duty. In February a general move was ordered, which also 
proved a disastrous affair and was known as the Burnside Mud 
March, and I will pass this by saying that there was enough mud 
and distress in the four days it occupied to fill a small volume, and 
when we returned to our quarters our shirts were so nearly alive 
that when we took them off for a change they nearly walked away. 
Our next engagement was Chancellorsville, and here we met with 
further disaster. The general in command, you will remember, 
issued a windy order, and from its reading one unaccustomed to 
hearing such orders on the battle-field would have thought the 
opposing army nearly annihilated, but it turned out, as our men 



20 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTV-SECOND REGIMENT. 

predicted, a delusion that was conceived in close proximity to a 
canteen of commissary at headquarters. We passed through this 
battle without much loss. We were making a feint below Freder- 
icksburgh to draw part of the enemy's forces from ChancellorsviUe, 
the enemy was shelling us from the heights, when we received word 
that the nth Corps had broken and we were ordered to report, with 
the least possible delay, to the right. As we pulled out, one of the 
enemy's shells took our Colonel's horse's head off. He was, how- 
ever, unmolested, except to fall from the horse as the poor animal 
sank back upon his haunches and soon gave up his life. Another 
horse was brought up and we moved forward. Before we reached 
the front at ChancellorsviUe we had a march of about eighteen 
miles, and this, I think, without exception, was the hottest march 
we ever experienced, and I am sure it is no exaggeration to say that 
twenty-five men dropped dead with sunstroke that afternoon in our 
corps, and that a man following our column could have walked the 
first twelve miles and never touched the earth, by reason of the 
blankets and clothing thrown away by the troops, which it seemed 
impossible for them to carry, by reason of the terrible heat. 

After crossing the river at United States Ford, we passed up to 
the front, where the battle was raging. The ground had all been 
fought over and the wounded and dying were crying piteously for 
help and water. We could not relieve them, for our orders to hurry 
were positive, and from the roar of the artillery and musketry in 
front of us, it was evident to us we had arrived at an opportune 
moment. It was nearly midnight when we wheeled into line, were 
ordered to fix bayonets and to go in with a yell. This was a place 
to try the mettle of any command, but there was no faltering. 
Every one of us had made up our minds to do our best and take 
the consequences. Just as we expected the word forward, there 
came a lull in the battle and by mutual consent both armies ceased 
firing, and instead of going in with a yell, we quietly laid down on 
our bayoneted muskets until daylight. 

The next morning the battle was resumed, and all day, as it 
would rage, first on the right, then left or center, it seemed to be 
about an even match or draw game. That night rain came down 
in torrents, the river commenced swelling and the mud deepening, 
and, I suppose, the general commanding thought he had better 
get his army back nearer his supply base, before the elements made 
his chances for a withdrawal an impossiblity. Again we find our- 
selves discouraged and our numbers wonderfully depleted, another 



ONE HUNDRI'.D AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 21 

great battle fought and no seeming advantage gained. We then 
went into camp below Fredericksburgh, about one mile from the 
Rappahannock, arranging our picket line along its banks facing the 
enemy's pickets on the opposite bank of the stream. Here doubtless 
some of you may recollect of swimming over the river in the night 
and trading coffee for tobacco, as this was about the first opportu- 
nity of this kind that our boys had. About this time quite a 
number of the New York volunteers' time expired and many 
returned to their homes ; and while the government at Washington 
was sending new relays of men as fast as they could, it seemed to 
us for awhile that our army was growing weaker, which was any- 
thing but encouraging. W^e, nevertheless, were kept drilling and 
preparing for another grand movement, which we knew could not 
be far in the future. Presently all was commotion, orders were 
issued for several days' rations, forty rounds of ammunition, and to 
be ready to move at a moment's notice. Complying with this we 
soon found ourselves moving at a lively pace towards Washington. 
A rumor was afloat that General Lee with his entire army by a forced 
march was forty-eight hours ahead of us, making up the Shenan- 
doah Valley with the probable intention of pushing the seat of war 
into Pennsylvania, to give the Yankees a taste of the medicine that 
Virginia had been swallowing for two long and bloody years. 

Our corps, the first, commanded by General Reynolds, by long 
and hard marching up through Virginia and Maryland, reached the 
Pennsylvania line near Gettysburg on the night of June 30th. 
The scouts and cavalry reported the enemy in force at Gettysburg, 
distant from us about eight miles ; how large a force it was impos- 
sible to tell, but early, July ist, we were in motion headed for 
Gettysburg, and as the men were completely jaded and worn out 
by their long march, the whisperings that we would doubtless meet 
the enemy that day and contest their further advance into the 
Keystone State, was received by the men ajid officers with more 
gratification than to have learned we had another long and tedious 
day's march to perform. We were then nearly twelve hours in 
advance of the balance of the army ; nevertheless, our General 
Reynolds determined to give battle, and trust to Providence for the 
consequences, and you will remember that his life was one of the 
first sacrifices we had to make, as he fell while riding forward with 
the advance skirmishers feeling the enemy's position, and thus 
ended his great war record as he expired in the arms of that 
faithful soldier, Adjutant-General Major Beard, as he happened to 



22 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

be near him when the fatal bullet from the enemy's sharp-shooters 
accomplished its deadly mission. 

As we came into line on Seminary Ridge, we were joined by a 
citizen whose locks were silvered by many winters, and, armed with 
a squirrel rifle, he was full of patriotism and fight, and when the 
l)attle opened did good and faithful service with our men. We 
afterwards learned his name was John Burns, wjio was the only 
citizen of the place or vicinity who took an active part in the 
engagement, and we all felt proud of our old hero, whose name 
afterwards became famous in song and verse because of his dis- 
tinguished service on this field of battle. 

General Doubleday succeeded General Reynolds in command, and 
the preparation for the action went on as if nothing had occurred to 
mar its progress — skirmishing and artillery firing seemed to be the 
order of the day, for two or three hours— when the enemy about three 
o'clock in the afternoon began to show a bolder front, and presently 
pushed out of the woods into the open field on Seminary Ridge, 
with two long lines of infantry, outflanking us by nearly one-third 
of a mile, and we had but one line of battle and no reserves. We 
fought them for a short time, our men never flinching, except as 
they were mowed down by the terrible fire from front and flank, 
and then in sheer desperation we were ordered to charge, which we 
did, but were repulsed, and the remnant of the line that was left 
rallied round the brick Seminary, and there fought until we were 
nearly surrounded by the superior number that swarmed from every 
direction. Our men at this point used their muskets until, by fast 
firing, they became so hot they were compelled to drop them, when 
they would take the one nearest them on the ground, rendered 
useless because the owner of it was dead ; and, I will add here, there 
was no scarcity of muskets, as the dead and wounded were largely 
in the majority of our regiment. Here we were compelled to leave 
the lifeless bodies of many of our loved comrades. Notably con- 
spicuous among that number was our brave, loyal and much- 
beloved Col. R. P. Cummins and Acting Adjutant Tucker, for, as 
the enemy seemed to outnumber us four to one, it was apparent 
that unless we retreated down the hill and through the town we 
must all be captured. This we did in as orderly a manner as the 
circumstances would permit, and when we reached the Seminary 
on the opposite side of the town, we formed a line of battle among 
the monuments and grave-stones, and once more faced the enemy. 
When the battle began our corps numbered something over 9,000 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 23 

and now only about 2,500 were left. That night our regiment 
mustered sev'enty-fiv.e men and three officers — when we commenced 
the battle we numbered about 320 men and sixteen officers ; so 
while we were forming our broken lines we realized we had been 
very severely punished, though we were not disheartened, for the 
balance of our army began to pour in and we made the night 
hideous by our yells of joy because of their opportune arrival. 

General Meade had been put in command of the army, and 
arrived that night in time to form his lines from Gulp's Hill to 
Round Top Mountain, which position was the key-note to our 
success the two days following. The fighting for the two next 
days was snnply beyond description. The fact that on both sides 
there were on that field nearly 50,000 killed and wounded soldiers, 
places Gettysburg as the greatest battle of the war ; and as we were 
victorious on the third day, and on the morning of the fourth day 
General Grant marched into Vicksburg, we recognize this time as 
the point in the war when the backbone of the rebellion began to 
weaken and the doctrine of secession lost its grip. 

I might relate many hairbreadth escapes by our officers and 
men, some of whom, by the kind providence of au all-wise (rod, 
were spared, and are yet numbered among our best and most 
enterprising citizens. One I recollect in my company, Lieutenant F. 
M. Powell, whose faithful Bible, carried in a side-pocket nearly over 
his heart, saved his life, and there are many others living to-day 
who, upon that occasion, were captured by the enemy and whose 
bones now would doubtless be mouldering in the hot soil adjacent 
to the prison-pens of Andersonville, had it not been for the hasty 
retreat made by the enemy, thus affording many of our men an 
opportunity to make good their escape. 

Here let me mention the names of two of our brave and efficient 
officers: Captain J. M. Dushane of Company H, and Captain 
Albert Heffley of Company F, who we sadly missed ; both were 
captured and too closely guarded by their captors to make good 
their escape. They returned to us after the lapse of many months 
somewhat diminished in weight, by reason of their experiences in 
southern prisons, but as fervent and loyal in spirit as ever. And, 
my comrades, I rejoice with you, that I see both their smiling faces 
with us to-day, which proves to us that some men in the i42d were 
proof against rebel bullets, starvation, imprisonment, vermin, and 
all the accessories of those places, calculated to lure the monster 
Death and make him thrice welcome. 



24 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

And there were scores of others, whose bright young Hves, by 
the fortunes of this great battle, were brought to an untimely end. 
They are not forgotten, for every year, on the thirtieth day of 
May, their comrades who still live, together with all patriotic 
citizens, meet and plant fresh flowers on their graves, that the noble 
sacrifice made by them for their country may be kept fresh and 
green in the hearts of a grateful republic. 

We are now, my comrades, on the historic field of Gettysburg, 
with its thousands of weary men, thousands of wounded and thou- 
sands of dead. Victory is inscribed on our banners, yet before we 
push out in pursuit of the enemy we have a sad duty to perform, 
bury our dead hastily and render our wounded such comfort and 
help as we are able to do with the circumstances which surround 
us. This accomplished and we find our column agam in motion, 
headed, as we supposed, towards the nearest point on the Potomac, 
towards which the enemy is pushing with all the speed possible, to 
effect a crossing, if he can, before the falling rain swells the stream 
to such dimensions that will make it impossible for him to cross. 
As we look around us and see the terrible results of this battle, with 
about 50,000 killed and wounded men, and horses without number 
slain and lying where they fell, no burials of any kind having 
been made since the battle commenced on the first day, naturally 
our hearts are filled with sadness, and the officers and men of each 
company devise all the means in their power to render some assis- 
tance to our wounded, and to bury our dead comrades with as 
much respect and love as it is possible for us to show them under 
the existing circumstances. Visiting Seminary Ridge, where we 
were first engaged on the morning of the first, we find our dead 
lying where they fell, and their upturned faces black from the burn- 
ing rays of the scorching sun, so that it was with much difficulty 
we were enabled to distinguish one from the other. 

We were soon called from this sorrowful duty with the informa- 
tion that our column would soon be moving. Towards evening 
rations were furnish and a large supply of ammunition, orders 
to march promulgated, and we are heading to a point on the Poto- 
mac nearest to our present location, towards which it was thought 
the enemy was hastening, so as to successfully accomplish a cross- 
ing before being overtaken by our pursuing columns. After march- 
ing about forty-eight hours, as fast as it was possible to lead troops 
in the condition we were after passing through so terrible a battle, 
there came down upon us from the angry clouds above the most 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 25 

drenching rain I ever witnessed, either before, during or since the 
war. We were, at the time, on a stone pike leading into a small 
place called F'unkstown, Maryland, where there was a small, but 
deep and sluggish, stream of water, spanned by a stone bridge. As 
we crossed the bridge, there was opened in our front quite a sharp 
skirmish fire, which made the men and horses in the command 
prick up their ears, and the men to examine their guns and see that 
they were in a reliable condition. The old caps from the tubes 
they removed and substituted new ones, so as to be in readiness for 
the enemy, who, from all appearances, was prepared to give us a 
warm reception, in case we continued our advance in that direction. 
As soon as we reached the other side of the stream, hearing the 
command, "On the right by file into line," it was unnecessary to 
say to the men, " The enemy is not far away. If you are in the habit 
of calling upon anyone higher than yourself for protection, when 
perils surround you, you had better embrace the immediate oppor- 
tunity of doing so, for we shall soon pass through that wheat-field 
stubble in our front and will doubtless receive from the enemy a 
shower of lead that will compare favorably with the shower of rain 
through which we have just come, except it will be much more 
effective in destroying life and in making us feel and realize more 
fully the uncertainties of each coming hour." 

The line now formed, we look for the word " Forward," but it is 
not forthcoming, and the men conclude it is only a scare, and in- 
stinctively they commence gathering a few rails and bits of wood, 
with which to build small fires, dry themselves a little and make a 
hot cup of coffee, but as the preliminaries of this are being accom- 
plished, a shell comes tearing and hissing just above our heads, and 
each man, without orders or suggestions, secures his musket and 
resumes his position in the line. The skirmish line is run forward, 
two or three batteries push to the front, their horses on the dead 
run. As they reach a good position they wheel into battery and 
open a lively fire. We push forward to their support, and in a 
moment observe the enemy have fortified their position with a 
good line of earth-works. The cavalry to our right and our skir- 
mish line, with its reinforcement, now almost a line of battle, open 
a lively fire, the shells and bullets are flying round us promiscuously. 
Our men in line cannot fire, so they tear down the fences in front 
and rear of us, pile them in line in front of the batteries, then with 
spades, picks, bayonets and everything they can work with, we, in 
twenty minutes, have an earth-work that we should be pleased to 



26 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

have the enemy try to take. This, however, they do not propose to 
try, and after we have exhausted every ingenuity to get them out 
of their works to an attack on ours, so hastily thrown up, or to 
an open-field combat, with no success, we are ordered forward 
and succeed in taking their line of works, but find only a few pick- 
ets in them, the main portion of their men having been withdrawn 
under the cover of the woods, leaving only a few to make as big a 
showing as possible and thus give them time to cross the river. 
Some portions of our army were pushed forward to the river, arriv- 
ing in time to capture and make prisoners a portion of their rear- 
guard, consisting of about 2,500 men all told. General Lee having 
successfully crossed the swollen stream in safety with the main 
body of his entire army, leaving only the badly wounded and killed 
for us to care for. We soon crossed the river at a point nearer 
Washington and guarded the gaps in the Blue Ridge Mountains, 
through which it was thought if General Lee were allowed to pass, 
in the absence of nearly all the troops from the defenses about the 
Capital, he might dash in, and, in spite of his defeat, become mas- 
ter of the situation. Sabbath came and we were massed about one 
mile from Thoroughfare Gap, where we were allowed a day of rest. 
That Sunday morning service was held, and general thanksgiving 
to Almighty God, who had given us the victory, went up from all 
our hearts. Our entire division was massed in a small grove of 
natural timber located near where we were stationed. As we did not 
know what a moment might bring forth, we marched to the grove 
with all of our appurtenances of battle, and listened to one of the 
most eloquent discourses it was ever my pleasure to give ear to, 
and, I might further add, that in my recollection I never beheld a 
more devout assemblage of worshipers. 

That night, shortly after dark, quite an uproar was caused by a 
dash of three or four hundred of Stewart's cavalry through our 
strong picket line, and down almost in our very midst, they not 
knowing what they were running into, and we not knowing what 
was coming. At short notice, however, our men were in line with 
fixed bayonets, ready for any emergency, and it was with much 
difficulty we could restrain our men from opening a heavy fire upon 
the mob in our immediate front, which we desired to obviate on 
account of the heavy line of pickets of our own, which were all 
mixed up in the darkness with the enemy, all of whom were cursing, 
yelling, firing and fighting in a most desperate manner. We soon 
organized a strong skirmish line and pushed them forward and 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 2/ 

Strengthened up our picket line, the enemy's cavalry, all that were 
not captured, flying back through the mountain pass faster than 
they came through when they made the attack. 

We remained here but a short time, when we pushed on towards 
the Rappahannock river. Lee, in the meantime, had reached and 
was occupying his defenses along the Fredericksburgh side of the 
stream. Here we camped for some time and recruited up our tired 
animals and filled up our depleted ranks. Soon our camps were 
laid out in regular order, drill of every kind commenced, and a 
general reorganization of the entire army entered into. This was 
no sooner accomplished than occasional sorties by our cavalry, sup- 
ported by small bodies of infantry, would be sent over the river and 
out into the enemy's lines as far as it was thought expedient to go. 
Once or twice we crossed the river on these errands. 

Late in the fall the enemy abandoned this line of defenses and 
fell back across the Rapidan river and occupied and entrenched 
themselves on the opposite high banks of this stream, we pushing 
forward to Culpepper and into winter quarters, with our picket line 
confronting the enemy's along the aforesaid river a distance of 
three to four miles from our camps. Nothing occurred to mar our 
peace from this time until the spring of 1864, when we entered 
upon the Wilderne.ss campaign. 

I forgot to mention that previous to crossing the Rappahannock, 
after the balance of the army had crossed, our division was taken to 
guard the Orange and Alexandria Railroad from above Manassas to 
the Rappahannock, and that Moseby's men kept us in hot water 
most of the time for about six weeks, keeping us constantly on the 
alert to prevent their depredations, and having us in line of battle 
ready for action sometimes four or five times during one night, so 
that when we were relieved and ordered to the front with the rest 
of our corps we were all rejoiced. 

On the third day of May the Wilderness campaign commenced. 
When we went into winter quarters late the fall previous, your his- 
torian was promoted to major and left in command of the regiment, 
Lieut. -Colonel McCalmont having been detailed to take command 
of Camp Curtin. During the winter we drilled nearly every day in 
company, in skirmish and battalion drill, and we thought by this time 
we were well up in all that it took to make good soldiers ; in fact 
our whole army was in fine condition and splendid discipline, and 
when, after every preparation had been made for a long and active 
campaign, the order was issued for the Army of the Potomac to 



28 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

move, with General Meade as its immediate commander, and Gen- 
eral Grant the commander of all the forces, with his headquarters 
with the headquarters of our army, we pushed out with confidence, 
but with the firm belief that there was a campaign before us the 
magnitude of which would overshadow all previous undertakings, 
but through which, if we came out alive, we could reasonably hope 
for a victory that would vouchsafe to the American people a 
peace which would be as lasting and glorious as the terrible price 
of blood and treasure with which it had been purchased was, in 
magnitude, greater than any pen or words could describe. 

In this we were not mistaken, for after the morning we crossed 
the Rapidan river, for a little over one year, there was scarcely a 
day we were not under some kind of a fire, and from the first shot 
in the Wilderness until late in the winter, around Petersburgh, there 
was no cessation of hostilities, and all through the winter, in fact, 
there was scarcely a day we were not exchanging shot and shell 
with the enemy some place along our line. Our first engagement 
in this campaign was the Wilderness, where, for forty hours, without 
a break or a rest, the battle raged with unabated fury. 

On the night of the second we moved towards vSpottsylvania. 
All night we plodded along, feeling our way. At daybreak, having 
made a distance of only about four miles, we were halted and 
ordered to make coffee in as* short a time as it was possible to do 
so, for just in front of us there appeared a small force of the 
enemy's cavalry, which seemed inclined to dispute our further pro- 
gress in that direction. We were told that to dispose of them would 
only be a breakfast spell for us, after we had drank our hot coffee. 
This place we named Laurel Hill. As soon as we had our coffee, 
we went forward in line of battle. As we advanced the cavalry 
disputed our way, but fell back as our heavy line of skirmishers 
began pouring into them a sharp and decisive fire. Presently, 
however, there emerged from the woods a heavy line of the enemy's 
infantry and a battery on each flank, which opened fire on our 
advancing column and caused the brigade on our right to break, 
leaving our right flank entirely without protection. This compelled 
us to fall back across a field to a thicket of woods, where we rallied 
and in a few moments, with logs and fences, threw up a breastwork 
from which they did not try to dislodge us, preferring, we s^upposed, 
to have us try and take a similar work which they had constructed 
before we came up. Each side strengthened their position until the 
next night, with no heavy firing on either side, except by the artil- 



OIME HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 29 

lery, the skirmishers and sharp-shooters, who kept up a constant fire, 
each making their opponents in line, and everywhere in range, as 
uncomfortable as it was in their power to do. 

The second night here, about ten o'clock, we received orders to 
advance over our works, and our division was formed in five lines, 
about thirty feet apart, with orders for all to remove the caps from 
their guns, except the front line. Here our regiment exhibited a 
coolness so commendable that it is deserving of especial mention. 
When the lines were formed we found ourselves in the rear line. 
The enemy had evidently, in some way, learned of our intended 
charge upon their works, for they had the woods enfiladed with 
artillery, and before the order to go forward had been issued to us, 
they opened upon us a most destructive fire, fairly cutting the trees 
down over our heads, and filling the entire woods with hissing and 
bursting shells. The lines in front of us became panic-stricken and 
ran back over us and back into the works. Our line was cool and 
we moved forward and took the advance, the officers of the other 
lines rallied their men and formed them in our rear, and soon the 
order to move forward was promulgated. Our men had fixed bay- 
onets and put the caps again on their muskets and forward we went 
with a yell. We succeeded in getting within about fifty feet of 
their works, when it seemed as if a solid sheet of fire from the 
enemy's niuskets made it utterly impossible for us to advance 
another foot. The supporting lines all went back. We remained 
in this death-trap, covering as best we could behind trees and logs, 
until we received orders to withdraw as quietly as we could, the 
pickets a little behind us having by this time been reinforced and 
strengthened their pits by digging and with such logs as they could 
lay hold of. 

One incident I recollect, in this advance, which, at the time, 
made me very proud of the old i42d. A shell exploded in a 
regiment just to our left and front — in the line ahead of us. The 
shell must have killed and maimed nearly a .score of men, and the 
regiment sprang to their feet and went back like a lot of cattle that 
had been stampeded. I gave the command, "Attention, i42d ! for- 
ward, left oblique march I " and they filled up the place as nicely as 
they could have done it on drill in a quiet camp, without a man ever 
flinching or murmuring his disapproval of the performance. Each 
man, like myself, seemed to realize the necessity of a compact line, 
if we hoped for success. 

The woods here were afire, and many of our wounded were 



30 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGlMENf. 

burned to death, and when all was over and we landed behind our 
works once more, there were more than one of us expressed our 
thanks that we were alive and out of that place, which reminded 
us more of the infernal regions than any place we had yet had 
occasion to visit. After fighting here over the works for about two 
days, we move to the left and find ourselves in line at Spottsylvania, 
in a miserable swamp. Here we whiled away about two days in 
deadly combat, and which was about a draw game, except that the 
Second Corps gained a march on the enemy by the capture of nearly 
8,000 prisoners in a single haul, which, of course, crippled them to 
quite an extent. Our losses in this battle were heavy, and our men 
by this time were so tired and weary, that when they were under a 
heavy fire in supporting a line, not being able to fire themselves, 
they would lie down and sleep as soundly as you could wish, 
though ever}' few moments some of them would be wounded and 
others shot dead while unconscious of everything around them. 
After the capture of the large number of prisoners, the enemy fell 
back about half a mile to another line of earth-works they had 
constructed, and in the morning surveying the scene inside the 
works they abandoned was enough to make a strong man's heart 
sick, for there were wounded men lying under those that were dead 
— they were literally piled on top of each other and presented a 
lamentable sight. That night as I was walking from one end of 
the regiment to the other to keep a sufficient number of my men 
awake so as be ready to fill up the line in our immediate front, in 
case it became demoralized or exhausted, as they were keeping up 
a heavy firing, 1 extended my walk to possibly one hundred feet to 
the right of the regiment to examine the lay of the ground, and 
was contemplating taking the regiment out of this miserable swamp, 
if I could do so without endangering the front line. 

It was about midnight and very dark, and a drizzling rain was 
making us cold and uncomfortable, and we were receiving the 
enemy's fire which we could not return, and I was desirous of 
improving our surroundings if it was possible. I had either lost 
my rubber coat or some one had taken it without leave or license, 
and I was beginning to feel the need of it very much ; and, as I 
pushed my way through the darkness, I stumbled over a man lying 
flat on his back and covered with a good gum blanket. It was here, 
I think, I had the most solemn soliloquy of my life, feeling cold and 
wet and not well pleased on account of the loss of my gum coat. 
The selfish idea of making my loss good by the capture of this 



ONE nUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT, 3I 

blanket was not long forming, and I reached down and carefully 
pulled it oft from my unknown comrade, who, I thought, was taking 
a comfortable snooze ; after doing so, it occurred to me that my 
friend, might be dead, so I touched his forehead and was at once 
convinced that his troubles were all over, for he was cold and still 
in death. Then came my soliloquy. I was about one hundred feet 
to the right of our regiment, all alone except the dead who were 
thickly scattered all around me ; it was midnight, and I was about 
to rob a dead comrade of his covering. Was it right ? After 
mature deliberation, I decided it was, and took the blanket and 
made good use of it until morning and the rain had ceased. 

We were soon ordered to move again by the left flank, and to 
leave a heavy picket line in our front, but not to communicate to 
them the orders we had received. We thought it was good-by to 
the boys w^e were leaving, for we were satisfied as soon as the 
enemy learned of our withdrawal they would push vigorously for 
their capture. I left the men in charge of a tried and brave 
officer, and so expert had they, themselves, become in looking out 
for themselves under the most trying circumstances, that I was 
satisfied that if any of our picket line succeeded in getting away, 
when the enemy found we were gone and they pushed for their 
capture, our men would, for they had become very proficient, and 
knew just how to take every advantage that presented itself, 
whether they were advancing" or retreating. And that evening my 
confidence in them was verified, for every man reported ; all tired 
and weary, but in good spirits and full of jokes over the long run- 
ning fight they had all day with the enemy, who had vigorously 
pursued and tried to capture them. During the day we had 
marched by the left flank after the retreating enemy without any 
very serious interruptions, and concluded that w'e were making 
good headway towards Richmond. 

Once, however, by reason of the stubbornness of the enemy's 
rear-guard, who sent us their compliments in the shape of shell and 
solid shot from their rearmost battery, we were forced into line of 
battle at Tolopotomy Creek, and our brigade pushed forward in 
line of battle for nearly a mile through the fields and woods. The 
result of which was the capture of about 100 tired-out Confederates, 
a cow and calf, some pigs, chickens and a barn full of tobacco. 
When we came back into the road each man was well provided 
with tobacco, and not a few of them had succeeded in providing 
themselves with enough poultry so that their messes that evening 



32 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

enjoyed a good, square meal of something that varied from the 
ordinary rations of our every-day living That night we slept in 
line of battle and were not aroused until early morn by the bugle, 
which warned us that we would soon again be on the move, and if 
any breakfast was to be partaken of, only a few moments would be 
tolerated for that purpose. 

We were soon again on the march, and kept it up all day until 
just dusk, when we came to the North Anna river. The enemy in 
small numbers were there to dispute our crossing, but when a few 
guns from our artillery opened on them and a heavy line of skir- 
mishers advanced and gave them a few rounds, they abandoned the 
ford and ran for the woods. Our pontoons were soon down and 
we were pouring across as fast as we could march. No enemy in 
sight, and it was nearly dark, our conclusions were that we would 
soon halt for the night, and as the idea prevailed, all of the cooks, 
drum corps and pack horses of the different regiments were up and 
the men in line. Many of them had picked up rails and were 
carrying them so as to be ready to kindle fires quickly, as soon as 
we halted, and make coffee and prepare what they had for their 
evening meal. We had closed up our ranks and were marching in 
fours, expecting every moment the head of the column would halt, 
when, to the utter astonishment of all present, the enemy in a good 
solid Ime of battle emerged from the woods but a short distance 
from us, and commenced pouring into our ranks the most mur- 
derous infantry fire I ever witnessed. Our line for a few moments 
became almost panic-stricken, and went back towards the river at 
as lively a pace as I had ever seen them move. While doing so 
our batteries were tearing across the pontoons, and as soon as they 
reached the top of the river's bank, they were ordered into line, 
our men rallied around them and such a battle, for about one hour, 
I think we never saw during our whole term ,of service. A sheet 
of flame from our batteries and muskets not only checked the 
advancing enemy from driving us in the river, but sent them back 
over that field with as great, or greater, loss than we ourselves had 
sustained, which, I will assure you, was heavy for the number of 
men engaged. 

You will recollect in this pasture-field there was a small stream 
of water which a man could easily leap over, but which had cut a 
channel four to six feet in depth, and which, at this time, contained 
very little water. When we retreated towards the river some of our 
men dropped in this natural place of protection, so closely were 



we pursued, and remained there hugging the banks. And the 
enemy passed over them, when pushing towards the river and back 
over them, when w'e in turn drove them back. It is needless for me 
to say to you that the boys that did this were much rejoiced at 
their narrow escape from a trip to some Southern prison. 

After this very sharp engagement we advanced our hues about 
half a mile and built works, where, for twenty-four hours, we 
engaged the enemy in a most bitter sharp-shooting and skirmish duel. 
It was almost sure death to a man to expose himself on either side, 
for each side seemed in bad humor and kept up an incessant fire at 
anything they saw resembling man or beast. After about forty-eight 
hours of this incessant unpleasantness, late at night we withdrew 
from this position, by the left flank, as usual, and early the next 
morning we found ourselves facing the same old enemy at Cold 
Harbor. Here they seemed to be in a terrible frame of mind and 
fought like wild cats. The losses in some of the new regiments in 
this battle, who were not accustomed to the bushwhacking warfare 
we had been engaged in for about three weeks, was simply terrible. 
The new regiments of heavy artillery that joined our army here, 
and were, by necessity, armed and used as infantry, were simply 
mowed down by the hundred, and fell and were swept to the earth 
almost like you have seen grain fall before the reaper. We hear 
that our watchword, " On to Richmond," was nearly realized, that 
we were only about four miles from the doomed city, and we 
rejoiced in the belief that the city and Lee's whole force must soon 
succumb to the continued bull-dog persistence of our commander, 
General (Irant, who, by this time, had given us to understand, and 
fully believe, that there w'ould be no let up or cessation of hostilities 
until the desired end had been accomplished. However, after a 
hard battle, each side fortified and fought over the works for about 
one week in the most malignant style either could invent, and many, 
were killed on both sides. 

Late on a rainy night w'e stole away from our enemies and hur- 
riedly marched through the Chickahominy Swamp, and to the 
James river, which we crossed at City Point in transports which had 
been sent there for that purpose. Here we heard our destination 
was Petersburgh, Va., which we were to capture, and thus cut off 
the supplies to Richmond by rail, which, of necessity, must come 
through there. In case we were successful, w'e readily compre- 
hended that the enemy, with their supplies cut off, must, of neces- 



34 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTV-SECOND REGIMENT. 

sity, abandon their capital, which they had so gallantly defended 
for three long and bloody years. 

We were told that if we did not make a forced march that 
General Butler and his division would capture the city before we 
arrived, and we would thus be cheated out of a large share of the 
glory of the campaign. Our men, not inclined, however, to credit 
all the rumors regarding Butler's achievements, were not at all 
astonished when, after marching hard through dust and sand nearly 
a foot deep all day, and arriving very late that night to a position 
as near to Petersburgh as the enemy seemed inclined to have us 
come, we were halted in line of battle and ordered to rest for the 
night on our arms, ready for an attack at any moment, as the skir- 
mishers in our front were keeping up a lively exchange of compli- 
ments, and it was not known what an hour might bring forth. 

This march from City Point to the place we rested that night 
was the dustiest march we ever experienced. Clouds of dust rolled 
up and nearly suffocated men and horses every step of the way. 
In the morning, after we had made our coffee and everything was 
in readmess, we advanced. This was the eighteenth of June, 1864. 
By one o'clock we had driven the enemy about one mile in a fair, 
open-field engagement, and had forced them back into their last 
line of works around Petersburgh. During this afternoon the 1426 
crowned herself with glory, in one particular move, which is deserv- 
ing of especial mention. We were advancing and our position was 
in the center, if I recollect right, of the second line of battle, the 
lines being about ten rods apart. The enemy was pushed out of a 
woods into an open field, our front line marching forward and 
firing, and the enemy returning the fire, but falling back. General 
Chamberlain, commanding our brigade, noticing that his front line 
was shorter than the enemy's — about a regiment — dispatched an aid 
with orders to me to double-quick the 1426 and form them on the 
right of the front line. I gave the command to the regiment and 
we moved double-quick, leaving the line we were in, and when we 
were sufficiently away from them, moved by the right flank and 
then by the left and formed, joming the right of the front line, and 
our men opened fire and moved right along, firing with the front 
line, until we had driven the enemy, as I said before, into their last 
line of works. The movement was made just as coolly and almost 
with as much precision as it would have been done in drill, and our 
regiment was highly commended for its beautiful performance. 

At this point there was a hill over which the enemy had gone, 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 35 

and through a ravine, and on top of the opposite bank of this 
ravine, about fifty feet back, was situated their last line of works, 
into which they had taken refuge, and which were bristling with 
artillery, the guns in our front being twenty to forty feet apart. 
We were ordered to lie down and cover under this hill, which we 
did, the enemy not able to reach us. For a little while we felt quite 
secure from any damage they were able to inflict upon us from their 
works. 

Soon regimental commanders were summoned to brigade head- 
quarters, at the right of the line. We were told that the line of 
works on the opposite side of the ravine were the last around 
Petersburgh, and at three o'clock the whole army was ordered to 
charge, and it was thought we would capture the city and Lee's 
army. We were highly complimented for our morning's work, and 
told to inform all of the line officers of the programme for three 
o'clock, and for them in turn to tell their men, and for all to peek 
over the hill and take in, as well as possible, the situation, in order 
to do what we did intelligently. This was novel to us, for we had 
been fighting from the Wilderness to this place, with little or no 
knowledge as to the exact object to be attained, and this new order 
of things rather captivated the officers and men, and, though they 
could see before them a desperate undertaking, when the order 
came at three o'clock our line responded to a man and went for- 
ward with an enthusiasm hardly ever witnessed in battle. 

Our brigade the day before had been strengthened by a new 
regiment, the 187th Pennsylvania Volunteers, numbering about 850 
men, and this was their first battle. There were four old regiments, 
including the i42d, and this new regiment made a Une covering 
about the same distance the four old ones did. General Chamber- 
lain ordered the old troops to go forward in the front line and that 
the supporting line, composed of the new regiment, should follow 
us at a distance of about 150 feet. He informed us that he and his 
staff would be between the two lines for any further instructions we 
might require. His orders to us was to watch the brigades on our 
right and left, and in case they broke and did not succeed in carry- 
ing the works, for us not to go too far and be captured, but if, as far 
as we could see, all went well, he would be pleased to have us on 
top of the enemy's works just a little in advance of our neighbors 
on the right and left. 

\t three o'clock the order was given, and our men dashed over 
the brow of the hill and down through the ravine, every man 



36 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

yelling at the top of his voice, to give as much enthusiasm as 
possible to the charge and thus terrify the enemy. Going through 
the ravine our men scattered like ?heep, but coming up the bank of 
the ravine every man was in his place in a solid line and anxious 
to push for the works, which were situated about forty to sixty feet 
back. The enemy poured a terrific fire from the works, but most 
of it passed over our heads and caught the line that was our sup- 
port. We looked to our right and left, and the brigades in both 
had broken and were retreating in disorder to the position from 
whence they had started. We looked back, and no supporting line 
was in sight, and no general and staff for further directions, and 
just here the enemy opened a galling, fire of grape and canister 
down the ravine, cutting everything to pieces just in the rear of us. 
We ordered our men to lie down and hug the hill, and open up a 
fire in front and keep the enemy down in their works, which they 
did successfully. 

The officer commanding the 149th, on our right, very shortly 
crept along the hill and we together held a very hurried council of 
war. He ranked me about ten days, and I naturally appealed to 
him for directions. After a short deliberation, we concluded, as 
our men were holding the line down in our front, we would 
together run the gauntlet of this ravine and see if we could find 
out what was wrong, and also to get further instructions what to 
do. This we did, and found our supporting line had been cut 
nearly to pieces, our general had been carried oft" mortally wounded, 
and every part of the line but ours had been repulsed. Just then 
an aid came up from corps headquarters with the general's compli- 
ments for our charge, and with instructions for us to hold every 
inch of ground we had taken, but not to attempt to go into the 
works alone. With these instructions, after giving this new regi- 
ment (which was somewhat dazed with the rough usage they had 
received) advice what they should do, we each took two spades and 
charged again through the ravine to our regiments, both escaping 
the storm of grape and canister with which the enemy was sweep- 
ing this ravine from works further to their right, where their line 
angled and gave them a fine position with their artillery to miake 
this ravine a very unhealthy locality. 

As soon as we arrived we gave each regiment a spade, and while 
part of the men kept up a constant fire in their front, the rest were 
busy digging pits about thirty feet apart. In doing this they used 
their bayonets, their hands and everything they could make avail- 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 37 

able, and with the help of this one spade to each regiment, by dark 
we had pits in good shape and large enough to hold six to ten men 
each, and from which our men were instructed to keep up a con- 
stant fire on anything they saw move in their front. So vigilant 
were they that neither the infantry nor artillery in our front could 
fire a shot at them without running the risk of certain death. 

We remained here until three o'clock next morning, when our 
line was withdrawn, leaving our pits well filled with men, with a 
large supply of cartridges sufficient to last them until dark the next 
evening, when they would be relieved. We were instructed to 
retire across the ravine as quietly as possible and build a line of 
works on the brow of the hill from which we charged. This we did 
and found it very laborious, as the soil was hard clay and very dry, 
and if we had not known that in the morning, as soon as the enemy 
discovered the earth-works, we would get a good shelling, I doubt, 
with the men's weariness, if we would have been able to perform this 
duty ; but we accomplished it, and by daylight we had our breast- 
works good and secure, and while the enemy, as we expected, 
opened upon us very vigorously, they could do us very little damage, 
and while they were wasting their powder and shell our men rested, 
and most of them slept, being very much fatigued from our previous 
forty-eight hours' overexertion. 

From this position we were soon relieved by the Ninth Corps, 
from which command a regiment of miners dug under and mined 
the enemy's fort and works. From this advanced position they kept 
the pits we dug that day, after further strengthening them, full of 
men and kept them firing constantly for six weeks. The miners of 
the regiment at the same time were tunneling under their fort and 
works, which were, at the end of this time, blown up, burying a bat- 
tery of artillery and (juite a number of men. This was known as 
" Burnside's Mine." We moved to the left when relieved, extending 
our lines in that direction. 

Our next important work was building a fort, which was named 
Fort Hell. Here our lines were exceedmgly close to the enemy, our 
pickets being only about fifty feet in front of our works, and the 
enemy's pickets so close that they could easily talk to each other. 
After the engineers staked this fort, our regiment, with a detail 
from some of the other regiments in the brigade, amounting to 
about 300 men in all, were the first to commence the work, and as 
I had charge of the work the first night I recollect how careful we 
were not to make any undue noise for fear of informing the enemy 



38 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

what we were at. The work was pushed with great vigor, but 
much caution, until we had a ditch about six feet wide and as many 
deep excavated, and the dirt thoroughly packed in an embankment. 
This we accomplished by morning, and were prepared for a good 
shelling, which we duly received at daybreak, when the enemy first 
discovered the work we were prosecuting, but by this time their 
shells did not to any extent molest us, and the work of strengthen- 
ing the fort was contmued for a week or more until we thought 
them almost impregnable. After this the regiment furnished a good 
detail each day to help dig the wagon-way, which was made from 
the rear about a mile up to and along the lines, for the purpose of 
protecting the transportation of stores and ammunition coming up 
to the front. It was a work of great magnitude, but saved many 
lives, as there was scarcely an hour in any day when a vigorous 
shelling was not kept up some place along the line. 

Soon after this Burnside's Mine was exploded. The lines all 
along for about five miles were in readiness at 4 a. m., and when 
the torch was lighted which blew up the mine, all the artillery, 
numbering several hundred guns, and all the infantry with their 
muskets let loose at on-e time. It made a lively commotion among 
our enemies, who, with the exception of their picket, were quietly 
sleeping. Had a charge been made right away after this bombard- 
ment and tremendous volley, I have no doubt Petersburgh and the 
entire Army of Northern Virginia under Lee would have been cap- 
tured, for the ground shook for miles around almost as if an earth- 
quake had taken place, and prisoners which we took afterwards 
informed us that on that morning for a few moments their entire 
line was paralyzed with fear lest they should all be hurled in the 
air and buried in a similar way to those in the fort that was blown 
up. The charge, however, was for some reason delayed, and when 
it was made proved 'more disastrous than otherwise. 

The enemy shortly after this were detected mining one of our 
forts, and the guns from this fort were removed and wooden ones 
substituted and a similar fort erected in the rear with the regular 
guns placed therein. For about one week we were kept constantly 
under arms, so as to be ready for them when they should decide to 
blow it up. 

They selected the afternoon for this performance, and as soon as 
they applied the match which was calculated to turn this fortifica- 
tion upside down, and bury everything in it, they jumped over their 
works for a charge. Almost instantly our guns opened on them 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORI Y-SECOND REGIMENT. 39 

from all along the liiif, and they were hurled back with heavy loss 
and in much confusit)n. Owing to mismanagement of their mine 
the explosion uiuler our fort was nothing but a fizzle, the packing 
in the entry under the fort being badly put in, and the force of the 
explosion was, to a great extent, spent in hurling the dirt back 
through the entry toward their own lines. 

Shortly after this occurrence we were relieved, and again mov- 
ing by the left flank. We heard our corps had been selected to take 
the Weldon Railroad, and thus cut off a source of their supplies. 
We marched, I should think, about two miles when the skirmishers 
were sent out, and our brigade being in advance we were formed in 
two lines of battle for the charge. We were in the second line, 
and your obedient servant, being the senior officer in the three 
regiments comprising the second line, was placed in charge of 
the line. These preliminaries accomplished we pushed forward 
out of the woods into an open field. Here we espied on the 
opposite side of the field, and along the railroad, a line of the 
enemy's cavalry drawn up, and as we emerged from the woods they 
gave us a volley from their carbines. " Fix bayonets ! " and 
"Charge ! " ran along the line, and in no time we were going forward 
yelling, the first line discharging their muskets as they ran. 

The cavalry did not wait to shake hands with us, but made off, 
except a few that were unsaddled and killed, and we had possession 
of the road. The front line passed over the road and halted. We 
came up, and fearing we might be driven back, the balance of our 
corps not yet being in sight with our line, we proceeded to make 
our charge of some account. We stacked arms and our line 
advanced, and each man took hold of the rails and ties and over- 
turned them twice, then took the ties and iron and made a good 
breastwork. That night the enemy tried hard to dislodge us, and 
came very nearly accomplishing it, but were finally repulsed. We 
continued to strengthen our position, and the Sunday morning fol- 
lowing the enemy in large numbers made a very determined effort 
to retake the road, but failed. 

In this battle their losses were very heavy, ours slight. Here 
we realized the difference between offensive and defensive warfare. 
Behind our works we felt secure, and when they came out and 
charged us three lines deep, we literally mowed them down. Our 
losses were very slight, our regiment, I think, sustaining the loss of 
only one man, and he happened to be one of the pickets who were 
far in our front and who had received the most stringent orders not 



40 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

to be driven in only by a line of battle. The enemy did not try 
any more to take this road, and we held it to the end of the war. 

Our next engagement was Hatcher's Run, which was a disagree- 
able battle, especially so to your historian, as he happened after the 
fighting was over to be the division ofificer of the picket, and was 
instructed to bring the pickets all off before daylight, the corps hav- 
ing been withdrawn shortly after or about midnight. I recollect I 
brought the pickets off just at daybreak, and supposed I had them 
all when I came over the bridge, and I so reported to division 
headquarters. I was then asked where the 150th Pennsylvania 
Volunteers were. They had not been heard from since the fight 
the morning before. This was the first intimation I had that they 
were over there and had been sent out as skirmishers before 
the battle. I told the general I would go and try and find them. 
When I got down to the Run our men had removed the planks and 
left only the stringers, so I left my horse and told the pickets sta- 
tioned there where to take him in case I did not return. I thought 
I had a passport to a Southern prison sure, but it turned out other- 
wise. I ran into a man who had just left them, and he said they 
w'ere lost and did not know which way to get out. We hurried to 
them just as a line of the enemy were coming on to them in their 
rear, and they had as many of them in their front as they could 
look after. As soon as they saw me I beckoned to them, and we 
made a very hasty exit, the enemy closely following us. We had 
two men wounded before we reached the bridge, but with the aid 
of the pickets on our side, who opened on them as soon as they 
saw them, we all came across the stringers of the bridge, not failing 
to bring along our two wounded comrades. 

Our next engagement was Chapin Farm, then Dabney's Mills. 
In this battle we only had about seventy-five men of our regiment 
engaged, and there were seven color-bearers of our regiment killed 
and wounded that afternoon, and I had my horse shot. I think our 
loss in killed and wounded that afternoon was twenty-one. By 
this those of you that did not happen to be present may know it 
was anything but a picnic. After this battle we were soon in winter 
quarters. 

During the winter our corps, with a division of cavalry, made a 
raid nearly to the border of North Carolina, and destroyed about 
twenty miles of railroad, and on our return' trip burned everything 
in the country for half a mile wide. This devastation was brought 
about by reason of our men finding some of their comrades, who 



ONK HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 4I 

had stras^gled and were probably foraging, hanging to a tree with 
their throats cut. After thi^ event, orders to guard any kind of 
property was a useless waste of words ; the men were desperate, and 
they left a desolation along their path (and it was through a most 
lovely country) that I doubt not to a large extent exists to-day, 
after a quarter of a century has nearly elapsed. During the winter 
the enemy began to desert to our lines more than they had ever 
done before, and their hard appearance and stories of distress gave 
us much encouragement that the war would end with the next 
spring's campaign, which, from preparations going on in our lines, 
we knew we would be sharp and decisive. 

We are about ready to strike, when early one morning, to our 
surprise, the enemy dashed in and captured the pickets, and ob- 
tained possession of Fort Steadman and all the garrison. This fort 
was situated near the center of our lines round Petersburgh, and the 
confusion and excitement it caused was, for awhile, very great 
from one end of our lines to the other. A desperate fight for about 
two hours ended the affair, however, by our regaining the fort and 
capturing about 2,500 prisoners. The next night we were packed 
all up, and at 2 a. m. moved out of camp, left in front again. 
Whisperings among the knowing ones led us to believe that the 
task of taking the South Side Railroad, which then was the only 
source General Lee had of getting supplies, had been allotted to 
the Fifth Corps and cavalry under Sheridan. Several times during 
the winter this had been tried, but without success. We knew the 
march would be short before we struck something to impede our 
progress. About 8 a. m. an orderly brought me word to drop out 
of the line with the i42d and 121st and guard the wagon-train, 
which was passing along our flank and a little to the rear of our 
column. This, I recollect, pleased us, as it was the first easy duty 
in time of near action that had ever been given to us, and we all 
naturally reasoned that the column would find the enemy and have 
one good battle before our services would be required. About one 
o'clock our skirmishers commenced business, our train halted, and 
so did we. Presently, however, an orderly came to me with orders 
to let the trains take care of themselves, and for us to push up to 
the front and join the brigade. 

This put a new color to our prospects. We, however, obeyed, 
and almost in no time found our brigade, and went into mass with 
them just behind a big woods. The skirmishers had evidently 
found a serious obstacle, for the firing soon became furious, and 



42 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND RI'lGtMENT. 

presently our corps general and his staff came out of the woods 
flying, and riding up to our brigade commander ordered him into 
line and to a charge through these woods. This sudden change of 
things filled the men with enthusiasm, and they went into this 
charge with more vim and noise than I had ever seen them dis- 
play before. We passed through the woods, cleared them, and 
nearly across a large field on the other side, and drove the 
enemy in flying disorder. So willing were the troops for pursuit 
that is was difficult to stop them. In order to let the remainder 
of the corps come up, for the protection of our flanks, soon a 
volunteer skirmish line was called for, and the whole line moved 
forward and we were obliged to halt them and make a detail. 
This accomplished, the lines all up and formed, it commenced 
raining — no, pouring — and for thirty-six hours it continued to 
come down in torrents. When it cleared up we pushed forward 
a short distance over the Boydton plank road, and massed in 
some thick pines. We hoped here to be able to build fires and 
dry our clothes and arms before again going into action, but we 
were soon informed by our skirmishers that the enemy were advanc- 
ing, and we were taken out of these wood on a double-quick, down 
a hill and through a stream of water that took the men to their 
waists ; up the hill, forward into line, and we commenced firing. 
The i42d, as we came up the hill, struck a knoll which seemed to 
slope every way in our favor. The enemy in our front were pour- 
ing in a tremendous shower of bullets ; I ordered the men to lie 
down and commence firing as fast as ever they could, which they did. 
Their firing being low was very effective, for in our immediate front 
we were holding them, and giving them more than they wished for. 
We are not very far from Five Forks and the South Side Road, 
and I was in great hopes that before night we should have it. We 
kept the enemy busy in our front, but to our right and left our lines 
gave away and were falling back. It was so smoky and foggy we 
could not see the color of the clothing of the troops to our right 
and left, and we held our front good until ordered by an aid sent to 
me to fall back with much haste as we were nearly surrounded. 
The order was given, and down the hill we went, and through the 
stream before spoken of. Quite a number were captured before we 
got to the stream ; and as my horse landed on the opposite bank, I 
stopped him and turned for the purpose of taking the colors from 
our sergeant, thinking I could possibly run the gauntlet and save 
them better on my horse than he could on foot, for I was fearful 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 43 

lest the whole regiment would be gobbled, the enemy being even 
and in some places in advance of us on both our flanks. The ser- 
geant — a very brave boy he was — assured me he would bring them 
out all right; and just as he said it I received a gun-shot wound in the 
side, which, for a time, took all the breath out of me ; and to obvi- 
ate capture, if possible, I dropped my reins, grabbed the pommel of 
my saddle, and applied the spurs as vigorously as I could in my 
fainting condition. The minie-ball that lodged in my side weighed 
only an ounce, but it felt, as I was going back towards the field, as 
though it was a twelve-pound cannon-ball. 

Our men rallied on the brow of the ne.xt hill, where our artillery 
had wheeled into battery, and sent the enemy back faster than they 
had advanced "by a large majority." I went to City Point Hospi- 
tal after having been patched up and bandaged in the field hospi- 
tal. I had to ride about twenty miles in an ambulance, much of the 
way over corduroy roads, and in with another poor fellow who had 
lost his leg ; and from my recollection of the journey, when we 
arrived at its end I was pretty well used up. 

The next morning our forces advanced and took the South- 
side Railroad, Five Forks, and about 13,000 prisoners. This broke 
the enemy all up, and General Lee immediately thereafter withdrew 
from Petersburgh and tried hard to make good his escape, which he 
failed to do, so closely was he pursued by our cavalry and forces of 
every branch of the service. 

Five Forks was the last hard-fought battle of the war. After it, 
for five or six days, our army pursued with all the vigor of a victor- 
ious host, and had some little skirmishes, but no great battles, and 
at Appomattox Court House the great General of the Army of 
Northern Virginia found himself so completely hemmed in and sur- 
rounded that sooner than see the useless waste of the lives of his 
brave army he sent to our lines a flag of truce. And soon the 
news of his surrender was heralded to the world. All lovers 
of the Union rejoiced, and all our soldiers had such respect 
for the men they had been fighting so long, that almost in 
no time after the surrender they were dividing with them their 
rations and showing them every consideration of kindness in their 
power. 

Returning after my absence on account of my wounds, I met 
the regiment a short distance from Alexandria, after their long 
march from Appomattox, my wounds having sufficiently recovered 



44 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

to enable me to join them in time to take part in the last grand 
review at Washington. 

Immediately after this orders to muster out the troops, by reason 
of the end of the war, were issued by the War Department, and as 
there was much to do in mustering out a regiment so long in active 
service, as every man that had ever belonged to the regiment had 
to be accounted for, and a general settlement with the government 
had to be made, I was thankful to be able to be with them to direct 
and help all I could in bringing this about with as little delay as 
possible, for now that the war was over all were anxious to see 
home and friends. In the performance of these last duties the reg- 
iment and her officers were highly complimented for promptness, as 
her papers were in readiness, and she was the second regiment mus- 
tered out after the order was issued, and the second one to leave 
Washington for home. As her commander, your historian always 
felt a little pride over this, and also the fact that when we left 
Washington he had in his possession a certificate of non-indebtedness 
from the second auditor of the War Department, which document 
he has always prized next to his commissions and his honorable 
discharge. 

After mustering out at Washington, we went to Harrisburg, drew 
our final pay and bade each other farewell, returning to our homes 
after an absence of three years, lacking a few days, with the sub- 
lime satisfaction of having accomplished that for which we had vol- 
unteered. And thus, my comrades, ends this history of your old 
regiment, written in the shortest way possible, necessarily leaving 
out a great deal that might be of much interest to all, but. which 
would make the story too voluminous for an occasion like this. Is it 
any wonder, after an experience of service such as we had, it does 
us good to meet here and know each other once again, and recall 
the scenes through which we passed, and the memory of those com- 
rades whose life-blood cemented our glorious Union and made it 
not only possible, but practicable and true ; that all men were born 
free and equal, and that a government " of the people, by the peo- 
ple and for the people," if properly and honestly conducted, is a 
government that will stand the storms of all foreign and internal 
controversies, and will be blessed and perpetuated by Almighty 
God for all time to come. 

I thank you, comrades, for listening so attentively to this history 
which you helped to make, and which I know would be much more 
interesting if better told. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 45 

Our losses from the time of our enlistment until our discharge, 
as taken from the i;ecords of the War Department, are as follows : 
Total enrollment 935 men ; killed and died of wounds, 7 officers, 
T33 men ; wounded, 21 officers, 409 men ; died of disease, etc., 21 
officers, 81 men ; captured and missing, 2 officers, 156 men ; total 
loss, S09. This percentage of losses, comrades, I am credibly 
informed is greater than any regiment that was in the service, 
with the exception of two. So you can reasonably say that your 
regiment was eminently a fighting regiment, and her record will 
bear you out in the assertion. With this last information, comrades, 
I draw my short history to a close by appending a list of the gen- 
eral engagements in which we participated in order as they came. 

List of Battles. 

Fredericksburgh, North Anna River. 

Burnside Mud March. Bethesda Church. 

Chancellorsville. Cold Harbor. 

Gettysburg. Petersburgh. 

Frankstown. Weldon Railroad. 

Thoroughfare Gap. Hatcher's Run. 

Rappahannock Station. Dabney's Mills. 

Meade's Retrograde Movement. Hatcher's Run 2d. 

Wilderness. Fort Steadman. 

Laurel Hill. Boydton Plank Road. 

Spottsylvania. Five Forks. 

Tolopotomy Creek. Appomattox. 



The same officers were then re-elected for two years, and 
it was decided to hold our next reunion at Somerset, Pa., 
the second Tuesday of September, 1891. 

The regiment then marched to the place designated for 
our monument on Reynolds Avenue and proceeded to dedi- 
cate the same, as follows : 

Reading of selections from the Scriptures by Comrade 
Brown, after which the following prayer was offered up by 
the Rev. Dr. Tomlinson : 



46 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Prayer. 

Almighty God, we thank Thee that we have been permitted to 
meet together on this occasion. We thank Thee that the smiles of 
Heaven beam upon us with uncommon refulgence ; that our cir- 
cumstances, though solemn and impressive, are altogether different 
from what they once were, when this spot and the whole country 
surrounding us were drenched with blood and strewed with the 
bodies of brave and patriotic heroes. We thank Thee for what 
Thou hast done for us as individuals and as a nation. We bless 
Thy name that, when this country was in imminent peril — yea, in 
the very throes of dissolution — there were brave and loyal men all 
over this land of freedom who were willing to forsake home and 
friends, and go into the arena of strife and die to perpetuate our 
government, and to preserve to us. our liberties, civil and religious. 
We thank Thee that Thou didst give us success and victory over 
our enemies. We thank Thee especially that we are privileged to 
meet together for the purpose of consecrating this monument to the 
memory of our fallen heroes, and of offering them this tribute of 
honor, of love and esteem. May we ever remember them with 
gratitude and respect for their devotion to the cause of freedom. 
May these soldiers who survived and are here to-day, rejoice in Thy 
favor and resolve to consecrate themselves anew to the love of 
home and country, and to the cause of Him who loved them and 
gave Himself for them. May we all, as soldiers and acquaintances 
met together — as we shall probably never meet again — think of our 
latter end, and determine to be more faithful in the future than we 
have been in the past, so that when the conflicts of life are over, we 
may all meet in Heaven where there will be no strife, no insurrec- 
tion, no rebellion, no war ; but where all will be peace and rest 
forevermore. 

Bless all who may now or hereafter be engaged in similar services 
on this great battle-field. May all have occasion to rejoice in Thee, 
the God of their salvation. Hear us, O Lord God, in all these 
things and answer us graciously, for Christ's sake. Amen ! 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMEN I'. 47 

Colonel Warren then delivered the following address, which 
was listened to attentively: 

Address of Colonel H. N. Warren. 

Comrades : We are here to-day to perform one of the most 
solemn duties of our lives — to dedicate this monument to the sacred 
memory of our brave and faithful associates, who, a quarter of a 
century ago, marched with us, shoulder to shoulder, in the line of 
duty, and who did more than we, for, as Providence would have it, 
they gave up their lives that their country might live. 

This beautiful monument of granite, erected, paid for and pre- 
sented by the grand old Keystone State, is a fitting and eloquent 
testimonial of the kindly feelings of love and charity she has always 
entertained and displayed for her loyal sons. Comrades, it becomes 
us as survivors of the i42d Pennsylvania Volunteers, this day and 
upon this public occasion, to thank in our inmost hearts the loyal 
citizens of this commonwealth, through our distinguished comrade 
who governs them, for their kindness and liberality in erecting upon 
this sacred soil this lasting tribute to our old regiment, of whose 
services we are all justly proud ; and to our fallen comrades, who 
were, by the casualties of war, transferred from our muster rolls to 
the muster roll on high. 

This monument, comrades, will tell the world — yes, generations 
yet unborn — that the men who composed the i42d Pennsylvania 
Volunteers were patriots ; it will be a silent yet potential monitor, 
proclaiming our sacrifice to Loyalty, our love for the Union and our 
devotion to the Stars and Stripes. It will impress our children, 
when we are gone, with the fact that their fathers dared to die that 
their country might live, and that the blessings of civil liberty might 
be perpetuated and handed down to them unimpaired ; and, unless 
I go far astray in my prophesy, it will inspire them with the same 
spirit of loyalty manifested by this generation, when it gave over 
half a million of lives to make true and complete the declaration 
of our forefathers that " all tneti are created equal.''' 

This monument, comrades, will live for ages after we have gone 
to rest " under the shade of the trees." It will be an evidence that 
the i42d Pennsylvania Volunteers was one of the regiments of the 
old First Corps, which, on the ist of July, 1863, under the gallant 
Reynolds, first intercepted and gave battle to the great army of in- 
vaders who were then, with almost superhuman efforts, trying to 



48 ONE HUNDKED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

transfer the seat of war into Pennsylvania, lay waste her beautiful 
homes, and, if possible, capture and take possession of her populous 
cities, when they could reasonably sue for a peace, such as might be 
agreeable to themselves. The result we all know, and we of the 
Union Army who still live cannot but rejoice that the issue termin- 
ated as it did, and that to us, in the outcome — 

" The lines are fallen in pleasant places, and we have a goodly heritage." 

Captain Snowden, late Captain of Company I, then spoke 
as follows : 

Address of Captain George R. Snowden. 

Comrades of • the 142D Pennsylvania Volunteers: We 
have gathered here to-day from distant parts, even from beyond the 
borders of the State, to dedicate the monument raised by a grateful 
commonwealth to commemorate the services- of our command. We 
assemble on this spot, sacred to the memories of our fallen friends, 
with feelings blended alike with joy and sorrow. It stirs us with 
joy unspeakable to see again our associates of other days, our com- 
panions on the march, in bivouac, and in battle, and to grasp the 
outstretched hand that nourished us when ill or supported us when 
wounded, and to renew old recollections and friendships ; and with 
sorrow to observe that "the moving accidents of field and flood" 
have left so few to tell the tale of great events now long gone by. 
The eye overflows and the voice can scarcely be trusted to speak 
the emotions of the heart. While kindly nature has with tree, and 
brush, and flower, covered gaping rents made in the rude conflict of 
arms, the lapse of time leaves its indelible marks upon those whom 
the fortunes of war and of peace have left to survive. In the 
quarter of a century elapsed since you were mustered out, slender 
youths have become stalwart men, " bearded like the pard," and 
those a little older have advanced beyond the line of middle age ; 
upon others the frosts have left their traces, and, alas ! others who 
escaped the perils of battle have gone to join the silent and ever- 
increasing majority. 

It remains for us to renew the story of the regiment, and while 
we may not recall our absent comrades from their silent abodes, we 
may pay fit tribute to virtues which led them to noble service in be- 
half of the cause for which they fell. While they perished in restor- 
ing a broken Union, they established the enduring fame of their 



ONE HUNDRED AND FOKTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 49 

beloved regiment. Regrets are vain that they lived not to see the 
day when, as now, the character of the i42d Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers for heroism, devotion, and other martial qualities, is acknowl- 
edged to be the highest type of the American Volunteer. Modest, 
patient, obedient, it did its work for no motives other than those of 
patriotism and fidelity to duty in whatever shape it might assume, 
regardless of whatsoever consequences might ensue, knowing only 
the oath of fidelity to the Government, and the noble impulses of 
hearts which had rather calmly face death with feet to the foe than 
ignominiously turn their back. 

As much could have been expected and foretold from the char- 
acter of the men who filled up its ranks, for they represented the 
diverse pursuits and composite character of the American citizen. 
Among them were the followers of the learned professions, men in 
business, bankers, mechanics of all kinds, drillers of oil-wells, 
miners of coal and iron, farmers, clerks, producers and manufactur- 
ers of lumber, teachers— in fact of almost every branch of industry — 
and generous and spirited boys from school, college, and the shop. 
The sturdy Pennsylvania Dutch were there, with their simple ways 
and honest hearts ; the stern and resolute Scotch-Irish, the indomit- 
able Welsh, the pertinacious English, the gallant and impetuous 
Irish, the steadfast Scotch, and the American of every extraction, 
Protestant and Catholic, all met on the level of citizenship and of 
patriotism. Made up of such elements the regiment formed a fit 
type of the State and of the country at large, and consequently in 
no other organization was the sentiment more prevalent and power- 
ful which led every one to feel that the war was his personal fight. 
Inspired, then, with the conviction that their individual interests, 
their future prosperity, their homes, and, above all, the honor, wel- 
fare and perpetuity of their country, native and adopted, were at 
stake, no sacrifice, no hardship, no danger was too great for them 
patiently to meet and successfully to undergo. With the cheerful 
spirit of obedience, the bowing of the neck to the voluntary yoke of 
discipline, was the lofty emotion of rivalry with other regiments, the 
resolution not to be outdone in feats of valor when tending to use- 
ful ends, for they had not the gaudiuin certaminis, the joy of conflict 
— few in either army felt it — and to hold the reputation of the com- 
mand not only free from reproach, but clear, bright, luminous with 
deeds of heroism and endurance. 

Officers and men alike entered the army with little or no pre- 
paratory training. The number of officers who were instructed in 



50 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

tactics could be counted on the fingers of one hand. As an illus- 
tration of the ignorance which prevailed of the simplest details : A 
lieutenant in temporary command on the first formation of the reg- 
iment put the right of his company where the left ought to have 
rested, and seeing the other troops with their arms at an order — 
those Belgian rifles of sorrowful memory — to conform to the move- 
ment innocently directed his men to "ground arms." But the 
colonel had been captain of Company A, Tenth Reserves, and the 
major had seen some experience in the three-months' service. 
Drilling, however, persistent and intelligent, soon brought the mass 
of raw recruits to a high state of discipline and efficiency, which 
enabled them to make an illustrious record and to stand with credit 
and distinction by the side of older and more experienced organi- 
zations. 

Aware of its own merits it never sought popular applause, and 
it was satisfied with the consciousness of duty well done. Sensible 
to praise and grateful for approval in those quarters where criticism 
was just and valuable, it was content to rely upon the truth of im- 
partial history for its place in the niche of fame. If, on the one 
hand, it was seldom that a newspaper writer or any army corre- 
spondent mentioned it in the pages of the press, which were too often 
used for the glorification of favorite leaders and pet regiments, on 
the other it escaped, for it did not deserve, animadversion or cen- 
sure. Now, however, that the merits of the various commands are 
being reviewed and carefully weighed in the public prints by accu- 
rate and capable writers, we should be unjust to our departed com- 
rades, to ourselves, and to our children, did we not proudly and 
confidently assert our claim to a superiority which is being tardily 
and somewhat reluctantly conceded. P'ar be it from us in any way 
to detract from the well-earned reputation of other regiments, our 
gallant comrades in arms ; but it can do them no wrong confidently 
to assert our right. Nor is it inconsistent with the modesty which 
sought no especial distinction, but was content to do its full duty 
unheralded by the blare of trumpets which attended the exploits of 
our fellows, now that the books are open and the accounts being 
audited and settled, to ask no more and to accept no less than that 
which is justly our due. 

Of individual and personal gallantry, instances enough might be 
cited to fill a book ; they were common to all grades, from the com- 
manding officer to the private in his blouse. The simple soldier in 
the ranks rivalled his colonel in exposure to danger, in fervid and 



OSE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMKNT. 5 I 

romantic devotion to the honor of his flag, m resolute advance upon 
the enemy, in firm, sullen, yea, defiant retreat before a foe for the 
moment too strong to be overcome, ready at a favorable moment 
to turn and restore the fortune of the hour. The men whose first 
experience of marching was on that memorable October day when 
they moved from Sharpsburg to South Mountain, in a storm lasting 
without intermission from one morning until near the dawn of the 
next, too tired and sleepy to stand about the feeble fires sputtering 
and sizzling in the rain, too wet to lie down, were the same who, 
when Lieut-Colonel McCalmont, in his stirring speech before they 
moved against the heights of Fredericksburgh, regretted the absence 
from illness of their beloved colonel, and asked them well to do 
their duty as became citizens of Pennsylvania and soldiers of the 
republic, responded with ringing cheers, to the amazement of the 
reserves and perhaps to the wonder of the Confederates whom 
they were on the way to meet. Later, in the thick of the fight 
when, risen from a sick-bed at Washington, hastening to the field 
on hearing that the army had crossed the Rappahannock, Colonel 
Cummins rode up at a furious gallop and was received with another 
burst of applause such as must have convinced him, if necessary, of 
the affection of his regiment for him and of their coolness in time 
of battle. On that disastrous field, where it first met the enemy and 
received its baptism of fire, two hundred and fifty of our comrades, 
one-third of those who went into action, including our gallant Major 
Bradley, attested by their blood their heroism and devotion to the 
cause. The sacrifice was in vain, for although the division under 
Meade broke the hostile lines and threatened to turn their right 
flank, the only one which accomplished so much, not being sup- 
ported by other and fresher troops within easy reach, the i42d 
slowly fell back, with a solid front opposed to the advancing foe. 

Passing with credit through the Chancellorsville campaign, 
where at Pollock's Mills and elsewhere on the left it withstood a 
severe artillery fire with calmness and fortitude, and afterwards on 
the extreme right it confronted Stonewall Jackson's veterans, and 
with the First Corps covered the retreat of the army. On this fate- 
ful and bloody field the regiment gained imperishable renown and 
shed additional lustre upon the country and the flag. The story of 
the battle cannot be told without alluding to this very spot, where 
you stood on that disastrous first day of July and unflinchingly 
faced an adversary flushed with recent victories and greater in 
strength and position. How well you performed your part cannot be 



52 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

known alone from dreary records which in figures coldly speak of 
losses, but history as yet unwritten when fully unfolded will reveal 
to your admiring countrymen a contest against largely superior 
forces which will reflect glory upon your name as long as the Union 
and civilization shall last, longer far than this stone shall stand 
unbroken before the elements. 

Pushed by the necessity of rea-ching the ground at an early hour, 
wearied by a forced march from Marsh Creek, you promptly formed 
line and opened fire. Only when Reynolds had fallen and you were 
outflanked were you pushed back. Your brigade commander 
grasped your colors and led you to a hopeless charge, an act of 
personal gallantry undoubtedly, but unwise, rash, leading to misfor- 
tune which might not otherwise have occurred. Your colonel, the 
heroic Cummins, borne off in faithful arms, gave up his noble life as 
a seal to his devotion. Forming a barricade in front of yonder 
Seminary you still faced outward and only when again outflanked 
did you slowly retire under McCalmont, flag in hand, through the 
town, fightmg, resolute, defiant. Like Caesar's legion, you put 
all hope of safety only in your own bravery. On reaching the Cem- 
etery, preserving your organization, observing the long lines of hos- 
tile infantry encircling your position, you held it until relieved by 
reinforcements of fresh troops. On the 2d and 3d you firmly kept 
the dangerous and responsible places assigned to you, and, while 
not again exposed to great loss, you well performed your duty and 
supported your comrades, who were more actively and fortunately 
engaged in winning the final victory which hurled back the invader, 
never more to lift his head north of the Potomac. 

To this brief and imperfect review of your conduct on the field 
must be added figures taken from yonder inscription, which has 
been verified by the official records. Out of a total of 336 officers 
and men, 125 only escaped casualty, and 211 fell in action, were 
wounded or carried into captivity — a loss of 6;^ per centum — greater, 
I am confident, than that sustained by any other regiment, however 
much it may have suffered, or however conspicuous it was in these 
sanguinary conflicts. Many other men equally brave died with the 
lion-like Cummins, and others, as one may see about him, offered 
up their limbs, glowing with youth and strength, sacrifices upon the 
common altar of patriotism. Well may a writer, to this day 
unknown, in the editorial columns of the Philadelphia Ledger, on 
the nth day of July, 1863, remark: "Few regiments in any cir- 
cumstances or service could show a nobler record than this. All 



ONE HUNDRKD AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 53 

honor to the memory of these brave men, who left all their hopes 
and prospects of life, not for fame, but from a sense of duty to their 
State, their country, and not these alone, but to the free institutions 
and principles therein represented, principles in which are bound up 
the noblest feelings and dearest interests of humanity. 

From this place, in rapid pursuit of the Confederates, the regi- 
ment returned to the Rappahannock, swiftly withdrew to Bull Run 
and Centreville, arriving at the latter point by forced marches, one 
of which was from Kelly's Ford to Bristow — a distance of thirty-one 
miles — in time to seize the heights before the enemy's cavalry 
could occupy them. Going back to the Rapidan it passed the win- 
ter in quarters at Culpepper. In the spring of 1864, on the reor- 
ganization of the army under General Grant, and the disruption of 
the old renowned First Corps — a matter of lasting and profound 
regret to all who had served with it — the 1426 became part of the 
Third Brigade, First Division, General Wadsworth, and Fifth Corps. 
General Warren. Time will not suffice, and the approaching storm 
will not permit, to name and describe the battles, movements and 
sieges in which it afterward engaged, for to do so would be to reca- 
pitulate the history of Grant's campaigns in Virginia. It is enough 
to say that in the closing scenes of Five Forks and Appomattox, it 
was ever in the advance and wound up an eventful and memorable 
career in a blaze of glory. Through your ranks went the flag of 
truce which led to the surrender, and Grant rode to the final meet- 
ing with Lee. You received your late foes with open arms and, as 
generous and considerate as you were brave in the last irretrievable 
victory, you divided with them the contents of your haversacks. 
Thence by marches easy to you, but severe to others of less train- 
ing, you came to Washington, where, after the grand review on 
which the eyes of the world were fixed with attention and astonish- 
ment, the Army of the Potomac ceased to exist, living only in the 
pages of history, and the hearts of the survivors and of a grateful 
country. At Harrisburg the fragment of veterans, weary with ser- 
vice, bronzed by the weather, and battered by wounds, was mus- 
tered out, and they returned to mingle with their fellow-citizens, 
conscious of a great duty well done, and content that their achieve- 
ments should speak for themselves. Later investigation has well 
justified that confidence. Able and accurate writers have shown 
that of all the organizations on either side, one only, a short-term 
regiment from North Carolina, met with casualties so numerous in 
proportion, and only one other, the 141st Pennsylvania, can claim 



54 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

right to compare with the i42d in the extent of its sacrifice to pre- 
serve the Union. 

Few commands saw so much hard service, none suffered greater 
proportionate loss. Of an aggregate of 935, all told, 809 met with 
the accidents of war, in death, wounds, disease, and other ways 
incident to protracted campaigns, and only 126 responded to roll- 
call for the last time. The history of the regiment remains to be 
written. Deeds of heroism and endurance, such as it performed, at 
times even unconscious to itself of their brilliancy or value, ought 
not to be left to the oblivion of musty records, or merged in the 
achievements of large bodies. A fruitful field is open to some writer 
gifted with an accurate and judicious pen and patient research, and 
moved by admiration for heroism seldom if ever surpassed since the 
world rolled out from the hands of its Creator. 

But, my comrades, little remains now to be said. We shall soon 
disperse to our homes and many of us will never again meet on 
earth. As you go your several ways, however, you are conscious 
that while long deferred and eagerly contested, the impartial ver- 
dict has now been rendered and your claims to superiority for 
bravery and devotion not only are not denied, but are freely con- 
ceded by persons most familiar with events which took place in the 
course of the great rebellion. 

As the shades of evening slowly settle down upon you and age 
withers stalwart frames which here and elsewhere did glorious battle 
for liberty, it will be a proud consolation to recall your unequalled 
services and to remember that you fought under a regimental flag 
which, while it knew defeat and victory, never knew dishonor. You 
have the satisfaction, after all your toil, danger and hardship, of 
knowing that the fame of the regiment is constantly becoming more 
conspicuous and illustrious, and that when all the truth shall finally 
be generally settled and acknowleged, the topmost tablet of the 
history of the war will record in indelible characters the achieve- 
ments of the i42d Pennsylvania Volunteers. 

The following touching address was then listened to : 

Address of Private James E. MacLane. 

Mv Dear Comrades and Friends: After listening to those 
preceding me, I feel that I cannot add anything new or that w^ould 
be interesting. As one of Company " I," I wish to express my 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 55 

love and esteem for my comrades ; and am proud to say that I was 
a member of this regiment. This is a most pleasing scene, and yet, 
what pangs and peculiar sensations pass through our minds as we 
take a retrospective view ! Think of the missing comrades, and of 
our experiences of twenty-seven years ago, as they pass before us 
in panoramic view. 

At that time most all of us were boys, not many having arrived 
at the age of twenty-one years. This is particularly so in my case. 
I was associated with you in but one campaign, but that was a very 
active one. As a participant and an observer at that time, it was 
forced upon my mind that our regiment was one of the best for any 
service recjuired. It was not associated with that influence during 
the war that manufactured "brilliant officers" in large head-lines in 
our newspapers at home, nor was it assigned to a brigade that had 
any particular reputation for fighting or that was conspicuous, until 
its connection with the Pennsylvania Reserves in 1862 and 1863. 
This experience formed part of our early military education and 
training. We soon became veterans and knew how to replace a 
missing gun or blanket, or do things necessary to establish a repu- 
tation as soldiers in that line. At this point let me ask you to go 
back to those days. Can you see our wagon covers, with the large 
letters and figures displayed, 142^ Regivicnt, P. R. V. C, thus re- 
cruiting and apparently adduig one hundred more regiments to that 
famous old division? What scrutiny and feeling that inscription 
engendered I But by the more intimate association with the 3d, 
4th, 7th and 8th Regiments of the Reserves, this was soon changed, 
as, by relationship, our colonel came from the 10th Regiment of the 
original organization. 

Your first trial and baptism was a convincing proof of your abil- 
ity to stand. That I have from the highest authority, from those 
living and some that have passed away. No regiment stood up any 
better under a severe fire, and with less confusion in falling back, 
than you did. Have heard the common saying, which is an old one, 
" You knew no better ;'' but you did know better, and circumstances 
that stimulated you at the time prove it. 

The old division officers and men of the Reserves all seem to have 
the warmest affection and respect for our regiment, and are solicit- 
ous that we should complete our roll of the survivors of the i42d 
Regiment, to be registered, and have their addresses placed in the 
hands of the secretary. Captain John Taylor, at Philadelphia, for 
membership in that association. 



56 ONE HUNDRED AND FOK'IY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

After my being disabled and sent away north to a hospital, find- 
ing my injuries and disease -permanent, I could not but follow you \n 
my mind, with pride at your soldierly conduct; .and yet with sorrow 
in my heart when I thought of all your marches and engagements. 
I thought of the killed and wounded, wondering to myself : Can I 
ever see them again ? can I see our regimental flag with battles in- 
scribed on every stripe as I saw others ? will our regiment gain that 
renown ? In this mood a jealous feeling of sympathy often caused 
me to think that my mind was wandering. I would be prompted as if 
by a spirit from you, saying, " Who composed the regiment?" The 
significant and imaginary answer would awaken every thought, and 
a happy yet sad realization. Vou were making your own history. 
I feel indebted to you, particularly to those that went through to 
the end ; and shall always honor you and point with pleasure to the 
fact that the composition of our regiment, both in officers and men, 
was such that has compelled history to place it among the highest 
when inscribing the "niches" of honor. 

To you, comrades of Company " I," my boyhood companions, 
many of you, I desire to speak a few words. I would not detract 
from any company of the regiment anything that goes to make up 
its full meed of praise, and I know the regiment will allow me to 
address you as an individual company- — an opportunity I never ex- 
pect to have again. Our composition was a varied element, re- 
cruited from the hills and valleys of old Venango County. Among 
us was some of the best blood of the sturdy pioneer, and from the 
oldest families of refinement and education. I could dwell upon 
names, but my sympathies and tender feelings for those missing 
will not allow me at this time. Those from the Oil City district, 
mostly young mechanics, were my immediate associates. Our polit- 
ical complexion was noted at that time, but soon vanished. All dif- 
ferences in that line were obliterated in the determination of fighting 
for the defense of one principle that would make us a united and 
happy people ; a principle that would in the end shine forth as a 
great halo, reflecting its rays over the peaceful valleys, gilding the 
old hills of our youth, and leaving to us in our memories the motto 
of our regiment, " T/ie love of country guides us." 

Upon this solemn occasion, as we are dedicating this monument 
to the memory of our organization, who would not, in silent medita- 
tion, pause and drop a tear of affection while thinking of Colonel 
Cummins? On this hallowed spot of ground, and upon this occasion, 
a review of his character as a man and a soldier, at my hands, is not 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 57 

required, as it has already been so eloquently and affectionately 
portrayed by Colonel Warren, Captain Snowden, and others. 

I shall never forget my first trial as to valor. The stock that 
makes the soldier, that sets the example and encourages others, was 
not in me. On the left, below and opposite Fredericksburgh, Va., 
May, 1863, we were under a very heavy artillery fire ; the regi- 
ment protected itself as best it could in a ravine, lying down, and 
some taking refuge in a ditch. Colonel Cummins hailed me and 
wished a canteen of water in exchange for a canteen of ''£//sir," 
which 1 most readily consented to. I held the hprse while he re- 
arranged his baggage and canteens on his saddle. While in the act 
of passing the canteen to him after receiving the "Elixir," in appar- 
ently less time than could be counted, about half a dozen shells and 
shot passed in close proximity to his head, and the colonel was only 
saved by turning in his saddle that moment to give the command, 
" Fall in ! " The check or curb-rein was twisted, and I was in the act 
of straiglitening it out when a shot struck the horse below the eye 
and carried the lower part of the head away. I had the rein and 
bit on my arm and shoulder ; 1 was horror-stricken and fell to the 
ground, as something struck me in the head, back of the left ear. 
In an instant I was up again and surely thought the shell or shot 
went through the body of the colonel, but was startled and surprised 
to see him, with apparent coolness, getting off the horse as the latter 
was slowly sinking upon his haunches, the colonel urging me with 
some emphasis to get "traps" off the saddle. This apparent co'ol- 
ness on his part was, to a certain extent, a stimulant to my nerves. 
I conceitedly supposed at the time I was really a veteran, and my 
lesson from him served to support me in many after-contingencies. 
This incident is upon record as one of the cases of singular vitality, 
related of wounded battery, cavalry and infantry horses. Imagine 
a horse with the major part of his head shot away, and running over 
the field ! Some comrade — I think Sergeant ^Vood of Company "A" 
— and myself fired several shots from revolvers into his head and 
neck, but the horse seemed invincible, as the shots did not kill him. 
Colonel Joseph K. Davison, late of the 29th New Jersey Volunteers, 
has told me since that the horse was running around after we had 
marched off to the right. So, doubtless, you could all relate many 
incidents of the war, and I will pass with referring to just one more. 
When presenting the black horse to Colonel Cummins, at White 
Oak Church, Va., do you recollect his remarks in accepting the 
2:ift ? 



58 ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

" I can cut or maul rails, I can saw wood, I can farm or grub, I 
can work at anything, but / cant viake a speech.'' The simplicity 
and honesty of his statement, and the expression of his countenance 
while expressing it, forced upon my mind the fact that we had no 
coward for a commander, but one that would fight, and see that 
others did so, if occasion required. 

The award of the contract of the design of the monument 
selected by the regimental committee, was, I am sorry to say, 
refused acceptance by the State Board of Commissioners. This, at 
the time, was a severe blow to our committee, to myself and to 
others. Subsequent events, however, have demonstrated that the 
commissioners endeavored to do what was best in the matter, and as 
a regiment we owe a great deal to the comrades and gentlemen 
composing it for the interest they have manifested in the erection of 
this monument. This is especially true of the secretary of the 
Board, Colonel John P. Nicholson, who was untiring in his efforts 
in our behalf, and is entitled to the thanks of every member of the 
regiment. 

Now, comrades, thanking you kindly for your attention, and 
believing my feelings and expressions to be the sentiment of one 
common family, I bid you an affectionate good-by. 

After which Lieutenant Miller spoke the following words: ■ 

Address of Lieutenant John V. Miller. 

Comrades: We, the survivors of the i42d Regiment of Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, after the lapse of over a quarter of a century, 
have been permitted to assemble on this field of Gettysburg, where 
so many of our comrades went down in battle. They did not live 
to enjoy the thrill of joy that victory gives to those that contend in 
battle here. On this field the light of their lives went out amid the 
roar of cannon and the rattle of musketry — some of them in the 
throes of agony, while conscious that our little force was being 
overpowered, before death came to their relief. At the mention of 
the name of our brave and gallant commander, Colonel Cummins, 
every eye will turn to the spot where he fell helplessly wounded, 
and yet with sufficient life in him to know that the day was lost. 
Picture, if you can, his thoughts and feelings for the few moments 
that he lived, as he saw his brave regiment repulsed and forced 



ONE IIUNDRIiD AND I'T)R1-Y-SEC()ND REGIMENT. 59 

from the field by the advancing thousands of Lee"s army ! But 
death soon came to his relief, and shut out from his eyes forever 
the brave boys of his regiment, for whom he had given his best 
thought and most watchful care on the march, in camp, and on tire 
battle-field. 

My thoughts this day are drawn in an especial manner toward 
yonder grove in front of the Seminary. It was there that Lieutenant 
Tucker, our acting adjutant, fell, after having been wounded twice 
previously to receiving his fatal wound — a young man, scarcely 
twenty-one, bright in intellect, a genial companion and a whole- 
souled soldier. 

After the lapse of all these years, our thoughts go back to our 
young comrades, and we sometimes feel that it was indeed hard for 
the young soldier just stepping on the threshold of life, his heart 
throbbing and his spirits bounding to the impulse of hope in the 
coming years, to take his young life to the field, and in one short 
rush end it. They were all young men, and every foot of ground 
from this spot to the Seminary was pressed by their feet as they 
contended with the overpowering force of the enemy ; and many a 
young and ardent soldier was stricken down from our regiment on 
this plain, who will never answer to his name this side of that 
Grand Army that is constantly going up to swell its ranks in the 
great Beyond. 

My comrades, I greet you to-day. It is fitting that we meet on 
this field where so many of our comrades have attested their valor 
and gave their lives a willing sacrifice to their- country and flag. 
This monument we dedicate to the heroes of our regiment who fell 
at Gettysburg. All honor to them ! It will tell to all people in all 
time of the patriotism and valor of the men of the i42d Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, not only at Gettysburg but in all the battles and 
marches from Fredericksburgh to Appomattox. 

Let our comradeship that was welded in the fire of so many bat- 
tles, fashioned by the long marches that tested our endurance, and 
sealed by the large number of our dead on many fields of glory, 
continue until the last man has been mustered out and we have 
joined the regiment again on the other shore. 



6o ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 

Private Horner, late of Company C, addressed the veterans 
substantially as follows : 

Address of Private D. J. Horner. 

Comrades of the 142D Regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers : I am glad to be with you to-day and join in dedicating 
this monument to the memory of the gallant men of the i42d Reg- 
iment who on this historic field helped to uphold the flag of our 
common country, and by their gallantry and bravery, in common 
with all the Union forces, drove back the invading hosts of Pee, 
and by the splendid victory they achieved in the field virtually 
destroyed the power of the enemy and rendered the final victory 
certain. 

It was not within my province to be with you on that memorable 
occasion, as I was then completely disabled, having been severely 
wounded in the battle of Fredericksburgh, in which one of my limbs 
was donated to the cause of our country. Standing here and look- 
ing over this far-famed battle-field, a feeling of sadness comes into 
my heart when I think of how many of our brave comrades fell 
here, and notably our gallant Colonel R. P. Cummins, who was 
among the first to lead forth the " Frosty Sons of Thunder " from 
old Somerset County to battle for the Constitution and the Union. 
But after the lapse of so many years, and after the splendid results 
of our civil war, there is mingled with this feeling of sadness that 
of delight at the thought that they did not die in vain ; that their 
blood was shed in a righteous cause, and that out of the sacrifice so 
nobly made by them our country has been saved, its institutions 
preserved and the domain of human freedom enlarged. So that 
the day may be not far distant when the people of other nations 
will enjoy the same liberty we possess. May this monument erected 
to-day stand through all the ages, and bear testimony to the bravery 
and devotion of our noble comrades of the i42d Regiment of 
Pennsylvania Volunteers. 

The exercises closed by singing " My Country 't is of 
Thee," led by Comrade Brown of Company H. Benediction 
by the Rev. Dr. Tomlinson. 

Adjourned. 



f^r- ,r. — W YORK 

pur aARY 



AEiC^., :-£NC"X AND 
TILDiiN FOUNDATIONS 




1 






■ V 



^V 



\ 



1 ' 

! i 



' ■ I ■ i 



[Inscription on Monument.! 



142b Pennsylvania 3nfantry 

1st Brigade, 3d Division, 1st Corps. 



Mustered in, August, 1862. 

Mustered out, May, 29, 1865. 

Recruited in Mercek, Westmoreland, Somerset, Union, Monroe, 
Pike, Fayette, Venango and Luzerne Counties. 



Present at Gettysburg, 336 Officers and Men. 

Killed and Died of Wounds, 4 Officers and 27 Men. 

Wounded, 10 Officers and 100 Men. 

Captured or Missing, 2 Officers and 68 Men. 

Total Loss, 211. 



Total Enrollment, 935. 

Killed and Died of Wounds, 7 Officers and 133 Men. 

Wounded, 21 Officers and 409 Men. 

Died of Disease, etc., 81 Men. 

Captured and Missing, 2 Officers and 156 Men. 

Total Loss, 809. 



Fredericksburgh, Chancei-lorsville. Gettysburg, Wilderness, 

Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopoto.my, Bethesda Church, Cold 

Harbor, Petersburgh, Weldon Railroad, 

Poplar Springs Church, Haicher's Run. Dabney's Mills, 

Boydton Road, Five Forks, Appom.-vttox. 



July i, 1863, A. M.— Marched from near Emmettsburg, reaching the 
field via Willoughby Run. Formed line, facing northward. Occu- 
pied this position. Changed it to support artillery. Reformed 
here and engaged a brigade composed of the nth, 26th, 
47th and 52d North Carolina Infantry. In the afternoon 
outflanked, and retired, firing, to a position near the 
Seminary. Here engaged a brigade composed of the ist, 12th, 13th 
and 14th South Carolina Infantry. After a gallant fight, again 
outflanked, and retired to Cemetery Hill. 

July 2. — In position at Cemetery Hill. 

July 3. — Moved half-mile to the left, and exposed to the 
artillery fire of the enemy. 



COMPLETE ROSTER 



i42d Regiment, Pa. Vols. 



isr Brigade, 3D Division, isr Corps. 



ROSTER OF THE REGIMENT. 



Field and Staff Officers. 



Name. 



Robert P. Cummins. . 
Alfred B. M'Calmonl 
Horatio N. Warren.. 

John Bradley . . , 



William L. Wilson. .. 
Charles P. Orvis 



H. Warren Stimson. 



William C. Hillman. 
Thomas J. Keely. . . . 



Richard C. Halsey. . 
J. Lambert Asay.. . 
Chas. E. Humphrey. 
Abraham M. Barr . . 



William P. Moore. 
William Shields. . . 



Samuel H. Dull . 
Thomas J. Wood. 



John B. Frowald 

George L. Dunmire. 

Joseph E. Mason 



Nathan S. Burnett... 
William P. Clark 



Joseph Moore. . . 
William J. Reed. 



Colonel 
Lt. Col. 
....do ... 

Major. . . 

Adjutant 
. ..do... 

....do... 

Q.M.... 
Surgeon 

As. Sur . 

..do ... 

. .. do ... 

....do... 



Chap.. . . 
Sr. Maj. 



.do... 
.do ... 



Q.M.Sr. 
Com. Sr. 

Hos. St . 

....do... 
PI. Muc. 



.do .. 
.do .. 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Sept. I, '62, 
Sept. I, '62, 
Aug. 23, '62, 

Sept. I, '62, 

Sept. I, '62, 
Aug. 31, '62, 

Sept. I, '62, 

Aug. 23, '62, 
Aug. 4, '62, 

Aug. 4, '62, 
Dec. 27, '62, 
May 28, '63, 
Mar. 17, '65, 

Oct. 25, '62, 
Aug. 28, '62, 

Aug. 27, '62, 

Aug. 22, '62, 



Sept. I, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 

Aug. 25, '62, 

Sept. I, '62, 
Aug, 28, '62, 

Aug. 27, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 



Died July 2, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 
July I, 1863. 

Com. Col., July 4, 1863 — not mustered — promoted to 
Col. 208th reg. P. v., Sept., 12, 1864. 

Pr. fr. Capt. Co. A, to Major, Feb. 2, '64— to Lt. Col.. 
Sept. 17, '64 — com. Col — not mus — wd. at Five Forks, 
Va., April i, 1865 — mus. out with reg.. May 2g, 1865. 

Died Jan. 3, 1863, of wounds received at Fredericks- 
burg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 12, 1863. 

Promoted from First Lieut. Co. G., Dec. 19, 1863 — dis- 
charged Dec. 10, 1864. 

Promoted from private Co. A, Dec. 30, 1864 — mustered 
out with regiment. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with regiment. May 29, 1865. 

Pr. from Asst. Surg. 114th reg. P. V., Feb. 12, 1863— 
mustered out with regiment. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged March 29, 1863. 

Pr. to Surgeon 208th reg. P. V., Sept. 30, 1864. 

Pr. to Surgeon 143d reg. P. V., March 22, 1865. 

Com. Surgeon — not mustered — mustered out with regi- 
ment, May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 25, 1865. 

Pr. from private Co. E, Mar. i, '64— wd. ax Dabney's 
Mills, Va., Feb. 6, '65— disch. by G. O., June 24, '65. 

Promoted from Sergt. Co. H — date unknown— trans- 
ferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Aug. i, 1863. 

Pr. fr. ist Sgt. Co. A, Sept. 1, '63— to ist Lt., 30th reg. 
U. S. C. T., February 24, 1864— died Nov. i, 1864, o! 
wounds received at Petersburg, Va. 

Mustered out with regiment, May 29, 1865. 

Promoted from private Co. A, Sept. i, 1862— mustered 
out with regiment. May 29, 1865. 

Promoted from private Co. F, May i, 1863 — mustered 
out with regiment, May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 16, 1863. 

Promoted from Musician Co. B, March i, 1864 — mus- 
tered out with regiment. May 29, 1865. 

Transferred to Co. K, 136th reg. P. V., April 30, 1863. 

Promoted from Musician Co. A, Sept. i, 1862 — tr. to 
Vet. Res. Corps — date unknown. 



Company A. 



Horatio N. Warren. 
Frank M. Powell... 



Martin A. Gibson. . . 
Cyrus B. Thompson. 
Thomas J. Wood. . . . 



Captain. 
...do ... 



ist Lieut 
ist Sergt 
. ..do ... 



Aug. 23, '62, 
Aug. 23, '62, 



Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 



Promoted to Major, Feb. 2, 1864. 

Pr. from 2d to ist Lt., Nov. 29, 1862 — to Capt., Mar. i, 
1864— wd. at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, "63, at Wilder- 
ness, Va., May 5, 1864, and at F'ive Forks, April i, 
1865— discharged by special order, June 3, 1865. 

Pr. fr. Sgt. to 2d Lt., May 19, 1863— to ist Lt., March 
1, 1864 — commissioned Captain — not mustered — mus- 
tered out with company. May 20, 1865. 

Pr. fr. ist Sgt., Sept. i, 1863 — wd. at Petersburg, Va., 
July 14, 1864 — commissioned ist Lt — not mustered — 
mustered out with company May 29, 1865. 

Promoted to Sergeant Major, Sept i, 1863. 



66 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Name. 



Alfred H. Goble . . 



Rank. 



Sergeant 



.do 



Alexander S. Love. . 

John Harsh ... do 

John M'Connell ... .do 

William G. Drum .... I ... do 

Morgan B Shirk do 



Beriah Orr 



lohn Gundy, Jr. 
John Hosaek. . . 



William Healey. 
Lester Moore . . 
Edwin F. Stiles. 



Joseph Jones. 

William Jeremiah. 
Robert E. Gundy. 
William J. Reed . 
Brandon, Thomas 

Blair, Joseph S. . 
Brandon, Wm. C 
Barnes, George B 

Beaty, William . 
Brown, Thomas 
Campman, David 
Grossman, Cyrus 
Campman, Henry 
Corey, John.. 



Coyl. John. . . 
Coleman, John W 



Campbell, Samuel D. 

Dougherty, H. H. 
Davis, John . . . 

Davis, David 

Dunmire, Geo. T, . . 
Davis, Thomas W. . 
Evans, Lotwig 



Ellis, Charles L. 



Ediburn, Henry B. 

Evans, Henry 

Ewart, John A. . 



Edgar, Joseph A. 
Early, William. . . 
Ginger, John C. 
(ireen, John H . . 
Greggs, David. . 



Hardman, George H. 

Hall, William B^ 

Hunt, George. . 



Jones, Thomas do . . . Aug. 22 

Jeremiah, John do... Au 



Corporal 

...do ... 
. ..do ... 



.do., 
do., 
.do .. 

.do.. 



...do... 
Musici'n 
. . . do . . 
Private.. 

do 
...do, 
...do. 



...do, 
...do , 
...do, 
...do, 
. .do , 
..do. 



do 
do. 



Mustered 
into Service, 



. . do .. 

do.. 

. do . . 
. .do .. 

. do .. 
, . do . . 

..do .. 



.do .. 



. do 
...do , 

. . do , 
. .do, 
..do, 
...do, 
...do. 



.do ... 
.do ... 
.do ... 



Aug. 22, 



Ang. 22 
Feb. 4 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 

Aug. ■I? 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 2.? 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 



Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 



Remarks. 



Prisoner from July i, 1863, to June 6, 1864 — commis- 
sioned 2d Lieut. — not mustered — mustered out with 

company, May 29, 1865. 
Pr. to Sgt., July I, '64— mus. out with Co., May 20, '65. 
Promoted to Sergeant, May 1, 1865— tr. to Company 

G, 50th regiment P. V. — date unknown. 
Killed at Spottsylvania C. H., Va., May 10, 1864— 

buried in Burial Grounds Wilderness. 
Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — died at 

Philadelphia, Mar. 24, 1864 — burial rec. April 4, 1864. 
Captured — died at Florence, S. C, Sept. 30, 1864— 

burial record, died Sept. 11, 1864, at Andersonville, 

Georgia- grave 8484. 
Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864 — transferred 

to Company F, 6th regiment V. R. C. — discharged 

by General Order, July 10, 1865. 
Captured at Petersburg, Va., Mar. 31, '65— discharged 

by General Order, June 3, 1S65. 
Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864— absent, in 

hospital, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged March 17, 1863, for wounds received at 

Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — buried in 

National Cemetery, section B, grave 62. 
Deserted July 17, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Promoted to Principal Musician, Sept. i, 1862. 
Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862 — mus 

tered out with company. May 29, 1S65. 
Mustered out with company, Nlay 29, 1865. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Died Dec. 15, of wounds received at Fredericksburg, 

Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Died April 9, 1863. 
Deserted July 29, 1S63. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1S65. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged February 21, 1863, for wounds received at 

Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. May 13, 1864. 
Discharged Sept. 21, for wounds received at Wilder- 
ness, Va., May 5, 1864. 
Died Aug. 8, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July 1, 1863 — buried in Nat. Cem., sec. D, grave 59. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 31, 1862. 
Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps — date unknown. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. 15, 1864. 
Promoted to Commissary Sergeant, Sept. i, 1862. 
Deserved February 15, 1863. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — discharged 

by General Order, May 25, 1865. 
Prisoner from May 5, 1864, to May i6, 1865 — mustered 

out w-ilh company. May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps — date unknown. 
Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps— date unknown. 
Tr. to 169th company, 2d battalion. V'. R. C. — date un- 
known—discharged by General Order, July 3, 1865. 
Killed at North Anna River, Va., May 23, 1864. 
Deserted October 22, 1862. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. Mar. 21, 1864. 
Captured — died at Florence, S. C, August 14, 1864— 

burial record, died at Andersonville, Ga., August 15, 

1864 -grave 5735. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 18, 1865. 
Died at Smoketown, Md., Oct. 25, 1862 — burial record, 

Nov. 2, 1862 — buried in Nat'i Cemetery, Antietam, 

sec. 26, lot C, grave 229. 
Deserted July 28, 1S63. 
Deserted February 75, 1863. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REcUMENT. 



67 



Name. 



Koonce, William 

Lytle, John W 

Leek, William . .. . . 
Li^'htner, Win. L. . 
Marsteller, Lemuel . 

Morton, James 

Morford, .Ahijah. . . . 
Morris, James K. P. 



M'Cullough, Isaac... 
M'Nabb, Alexander C 
M'Coy, Alexander . . 

Orr, John S 

Orr, William A 



Piper, Freeman N. . 
Patton, Allen C. ... 
Preston, |ohn H. . . 
Perry, Henry W... 

Rice, Albert 

Russell, James H.. . 
Smith, William W... 

Smith, John R 

Smith, John 

Stirason, H. Warren. 
Stewart, Linus M . . . 



Thompson, Noah M. 
Tate, Alfred 



Webster, John M 

Williams, William J.. 
Williams, William T. 
Webster, James W. . . 
Williamson, Jas. A. . . 
Williams, Job 



Rank. 



Private. 

....do .. 

...do .. 
do . . 

...do.. 
. . . do . . 

. . do . . 

. ..do .. 



. . do 
..do 
..do 
...do 
...do 



..do. 
.do. 
. .do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
.. do . 
..do 
...do 

...do, 
...do , 



...do. 
...do, 
..do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Auff. 22 
Aug:. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Sept. I 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 

Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 22 



Remarks. 



Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 16, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Killed February 21, 1863. 

Killed at Wilderness, V'a., May 6, 1864. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Discharged by General Order, May 26, 1865. 

Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps— date unknown 

Died June 24, of wounds rec. at Petersburg. V'a., June 
18, 1864— buried in National Cemeterv, Arlington. 

Mustered out with company. May 2q 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. May 18, 1865. 

Transferred to U. S. Navy, April 17, 1864. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged March 16, 1863, for wounds received at 
Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, July i, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 15, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 20, 18G5. 

Captured — died at Florence, S. C., July 15, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. Mar. 12, 1863. 

Promoted to Adjutant, December 30, 1864. 

Died Jan. 16, 1863, of wounds received at Fredericks- 
burg, V^a., December 13, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, June 22, 1863. 

Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — died at 
Annapolis, Md., Sept. 30, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. Mar. 27, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Aug. 4. 186;. 



C O M ? A N V B. 



John G. Andrews.. 
Daniel S. Wilkins. . 



Edward B. Hurst.. 
Daniel S. Tinsman. 
Urbannas Hubbs . . 



Albert A. Hasson . 



John M. Kough. . . 
George A. Bare.. . 

David Wilkins 

Samuel A. Bare. . . 
Thomas Lonergan 



Griffith P. Clark . . 

John S. Hood. . . . 

Samuel Dice 

Thomas Canevin. . 

Milton S. Lohr 

Henry Gibson .... 

George W. Stacy . 
Peter G. Mathews 

Cyrus Walter 

Cytus Swartz. . . . 
William P. Clark.. 
Anderson, Clifford 
Aspy, Ezra 



Captain . 
....do... 



ist Lt. . 

. . . do . . 
ist Sgt. 



....do... 

Sergeant 
....do... 
....do... 
. ...do ... 
. ...do... 



...do... 

Corporal 
. ..do ... 
...do ... 

...do ... 

...do... 



. do . . . 
...do... 
. ...do . . 
Musician 

..do... 
Private.. 
....do ... 



Aug. 27, '62 
Aug. 27, '62 

Aug. 27, '62 
Aug. 26, '62 
Aug. 26, '62 



Aug. 26, '62 

Aug. 26, '62 
Aug. 28, '62 
Aug. 28, '62 
Aug. 26, '62 
Aug. 26, '62 

Aug. 26, '62 

Aug. 26, '62 
Aug. 26, '62 
Aug. 26, '62 
."Vug. 26, '62 
Aug. 26, '62 

Aug. 26, '62 

Aug. 26, '62 

Aug. 26, '62 

Aug. 28, '62 

Aug. 28, '62 

Aug. 26, '62 
Aug. 26, "62 



Discharged Aug. 20, 1864. 

Pr. froni 2d to ist Lt., July i, 1864— to Capt., Sept. 21, 

1864 — mustered out with company. May 29, 1S65. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Pr. fr. Sgt., Oct. 24, '64 — mus. out with Co. May 29, '65. 
Pr. from private to Sergt., March i, 1864 — to ist Sergt. 

Nov. I, 1864 — com. 2d Lt. June 3, 1865 — not mustered 

— discharged by General Order, June 7, 1865. 
Transferred to T6Qth Co., 2d batt.. Vet. Reserve Corps, 

Feb. 15, 1864 -discharged by G. O., July 3, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Pr. fr. Cor. Nov. i, '64— mus. out with Co. May 20, '65. 
Pr. fr. Cor. Nov. i, '64 -mus. out with Co. May 29 '65. 
Pr. f r. Cor. Nov. i, '64 - mus. out with Co. May 29, '65. 
Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, i862^^is- 

charged by General Order, March i, 1864. 
Tr. to Co. G, 18th reg. Vet. Reserve Corps, Feb. 15, 

1864— discharged by "General Order, June 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
J'r. to Cor., Nov. i, 1863— disch. by G. O. June 16, '65. 
Pr. to Cor. Nov. i, '63— mus. out with Co. May 20, '65. 
Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862 — 

discharged on Surgeon's certificate. May 5, 1863. 
Pr. to Cor. April i, 1864— disch. by G. O. May 15, 1865. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Died of wounds rec'd at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 27, 1863. 
Promoted to Principal Musician, March i, 1864. 
Mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, January 20, 1863. 



68 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Name. 



Ash, Thaddeus 



Brothers, Frank .... 
Buttermore, William 

Blake, Wesley 

Brier, George 

Brothers, Geo. W . . 
Brinker, Simon P . 

Beal, William S 

Byers, Harrison . . . . 
Bare, Adam G. . . . 

Berg, Samuel 

Brothers, Cyrus 
Bostler, Manuel 



Coleman, George W 

Cole, Cyrus 

Campbell, John G.. 
Cunningham, G. W 
Cramer, Enos R. . 
Culp, John 

Cramer, Adam G 
Cramer, Samuel . . . 

Durstein, Henry S. 
Ebersole, John W. 
Finefrock, Samuel. 
Gallatin, Albert. . 

Guist, William 

Gettama, Noah .... 
House, Joseph ... . 
Hanger, Harrison . 
Hokenshell, David. 
Horner, Myers. . . 

Hartman, John 

Hurst, William Y. . 
Hokenshell, Samuel 
Hays, Abraham H . 

Hubbs, James 



Keihl, Amos 

Kelly, Charles C. . . 
Kowen, Samuel . . . . 
Kepple, Michael G. 

Loucks, Martin S. . 
Leaher, Jacob C 
Marmie, Peter. . . . 
Moody, John N. . . 
Malone, Shephard . 
Muman, Daniel . . 
Music, Samuel 



Music, Philip 



May, Levi B 

Niderhiser, Samuel 
Nickols, Oliver .... 



Nidrow, Thomas 

Pool, Alexander 

Rowen, Peter 

Ruff, Israel M 

Reese, John W 

Sullenbarger, George 

Sible, Jacob 

Sharrow, Daniel. 
Shunk, Benjamin 
Smith, Samuel M.. 



.do , 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do, 

.do, 

.do 

.do 

.do , 

.do , 



.do. 
do . 
.do . 
.do . 

.do . 

do . 

do. 
.do , 

do . 

do, 

do. 



...do. 



.do, 
.do , 
.do. 



..do. 
...do 

. do. 
. . do , 
...do. 
...do . 
...do. 
...do . 
...do. 
...do , 



Mustered 
into Service 



Aug. 26, '62 



Aug. 26 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26, 

Aug. 26 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26, 

Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 

Aug. 26 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26 



Aug. 26, 
Aug. 28, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 

Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 

Aug. 26, 

Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 

Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 
Aug. 26, 



Aug. 28, '62 



Remarks. 



Killed at North Anna River, May 23, 1863 — buried in 

Nat. Cem., Richmond, Va., sec 6, div. 3, grave 40. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29. 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 186;. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 14, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 16, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, August 12, 1864. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 24, 1864. 
Died Dec. 29, of wounds rec. at Fredericksburg, Va., 

Dec. 13, 1862 — buried in Mil. Asy. Cem., D. C. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Nov. 9, 1863. 
Tr. to Veteran Reserve Corps, September 25, 1S63. 
Tr. to Veteran Reserve Corps, September 25, 1863. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Di2d of wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., 

December 13, 1862. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863— buried in 

National Cemetery, section B. grave 6 5. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 22, 1863. 
Tr. to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 3, 1863. 
Killed af Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 17, 1862. 
Tr. to Vetaran Reserve Corps, November 25, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, iS'is. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1S65. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 28, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 7, 1863. 
Tr. to Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. 15, 1863. 
Died Jan. 13, 1863, of wounds received at Fredericks- 
burg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Died Jan. 18— burial rec. Jan. 12, 1863 — of wounds rec. 

at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862— buried in 

Military Asylum Cemetery, D. C. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with comjiany. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Died at Washington, D. C., Jan. 24, 1864— buried in 

Military Asylum Cemetery. 
Mustered out with company May 29, 1865. 
Tr. to Veteran Reserve Corps. Feb. 15, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. ' 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 20, 1864. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 7, 1863 — 

discharged by General Order, July 5, 1S65. 
Died at Belle Plain, Va., January i, 1S63, of wounds 

received at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Wounded at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864— absent, in 

hospital, at muster out. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 24, 1S63. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 27, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 2, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 26, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Sept. 25, 1863. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Died January 16, 1863— burial record, Jan. g. 1863— of 

wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va.. Dec. 13, 

1862— buried in Military Asylum Cemetery. D. C. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



69 



Name. 


R.\NK. 


Mustered 
into Service. 


Remarks. 


SuUenbarger, Leo'd . 

Sims, William 

Swain, Franklin 

Sharron, Israel 

Thompson, John 

Thomas, Samuel. . . . 
Vance, Joshua 


Private.. 

....do... 
.. .do ... 
...do .. 

.. do . .. 
....do ... 
. ..do... 
...do ... 


Aug. 26, 'C2, 
Aug. 26, '62, 
Aug. 26, '62, 
Aug. 26, '62, 

Aug. 26, '62, 
Aug. 26, '62, 
Aug. 26, '62, 
Aug. 26, '62, 
Aug. 28, '62, 
Aug. 28, '62, 
Aug. 26, '62, 
Aug. 26, '62, 


Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Sept. 25, 1863. 

Died July 24, 1863. 

Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Died at Washington, D. C., April 21, 1865 — buried in 

National Cemetery, Arlington, Va. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged by General Order, July 15, 1865. 




....do... 


Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 


Washabach, Jacob . . . 
Waltz, lacob B 


....do... 
do ... 


Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 25, 1863. 
Killed at (Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Disiharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 9, 1863. 


Zuck, David 


...do... 



Com p a n y C. 



John H. Boyts . . 
Henry G. Elder. 



Jacob R, Walter 



Nath. O. Hinchman. 
Charles F. Hunter. . 



Captain 
. ...do .. 



ist Lt. . 



2d Lt 
ist Sgt 



John J. Hoffman do . . . 

Franklin Boyts ' Sergeant 



Daniel Voung 

Jacob PhiUipi 

Benj. F. Harcomb. . 
.\ugiistus Davis.. . . . 
Sanuiel H. Brougher. 
N'ormaii Phillippi . . . . 
Wesley Humbert . . . . 



Samuel Gerhart. 



Simon Pile 

Jonas Mayers 

Jacob Bitner 

Jacob S. Nichelson. . 
Jerome B. Knable . . 

Joseph Bitner 

George Snyder 

Charles Elder 

Ansell, Michael. . . . 

Ansell, David 

Boyts, Benjamin. .. 
Bowlby, Samuel . . . . 
Berkey, Elijah H . . 

Boyts, Hiram 

Beyers, John 

Cunningham, J. C . 



Cupp, Hiram 

Cupp, Isaiah 

Dumbauld, Frederick 
Forespnng, Garret . 

Faith, William 

Firestone, Michael A 



Gray, Henry 

Growall, Anthony.. . 

Growall, Peter . 
Henry, Joshua. . 



...do... 
.. do... 
..do ... 
...do . , 
...do ... 
Corporal 
...do ... 



...do... 

...do... 
, . . . do . . . 
....do .. 
, ..do... 
....do ... 
. ..do .. 
Musician 
do . . , 
Private.. 
..do... 
....do... 
. ..do .. 

...do. 

...do.. 

...do. 



.do . 

.do . 

do 

do , 
.do 



..do 
..do 



do 
do , 



Aug. 27, '62, 
Aug. 27, '62, 



Aug. 27, 'ti2 



Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


■62, 


Aug. 25, 


•62, 


Aug. 25, 


•62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


.\ug. 25, 


■62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


■62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'()2, 


Aug. 26, 


'62. 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


■t.2. 


Aug. 25, 


(12, 


Aug. 25, 


02, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


62, 


Aug. 25, 


■62, 


Aug. 25, 


b2, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


•62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


62, 


Aug. 25, 


(J2, 


Aug. 26, 


■62, 


Aug. 25, 


62, 


Aug. 30, 


•64. 


Aug. 26, 


'62, 


Aug. 26, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 



Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 22, 1863. 

Pr. fr. ist Lt. Feb. 22, 1863— 6v. Maj. March 3, 1865— 
Bv. Lt. CoL April 2, 1865 — wd. at Five Forks, Va., 
April I, 1865— com. Major, May 16, 1865 — not mus. — 
mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Pr. from 2d Lieut. Feb. 22, 1863 — com. Captain — not 
mustered — wd. at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — 
mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Pr. from Sgt. June 2, 1863 — discharged March 23, 1864. 

Pr. to 1st Sgt. March i, "1864— com. ist Lt.— not mus- 
tered — mustered out with company. May 29, 1S65. 

Discharged Dec. 28, 1863. 

Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864— absent, in 
hospital, at muster out. 

Com. 2d Lt. — not mus.— disch. by G. O., May 25, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged Feb. 25, 1863. 

Disch. for wds. rec. at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Died at Philadelphia, Pa., April 4, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, i863~tr. to 59th 
Co., 2d Batt. V. R. C.~disch. by G. O., April 20, '65. 

Captured at Wilderness, V^a., May 5, 1864— died at 
Andersonville, Ga., Sept. 17, 1864 — grave 9005. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1S65. 

Discharged Jan. 27, 1863. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Dec. 13, 1863. 

Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Transferred 10 Vet. Res. Corps, Dec. 31, 1863. 

Died December 26, 1862. 

Mustered out with companv. May 29, 1865. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged Feb. 18, 1863. 

Died Jan. 5, 1863— buried in Mil. Asy. Cemetery, D. C. 

Died at Washington, D. C, Aug. 28, 1864. 

Died October 24, 1862— buried in National Cemetery, 
Antietam, Md., section 26, lot C, grave 234. 

Tr. to Co. B, 14th reg. Vet. Res. Corps, July 24, 1863— 
discharged by General Order, June 26, 1865. 

Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Died September 12, 1862. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged February 26, 1863. 

Tr. to 95th Co., 2d batt.. Vet. Reserve Corps, Dec. 17, 
1S63— discharged by General Order, Aug. 24, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 

Tr. to i6Qth Co., 2d batt.. Vet. Reserve Corps, Feb. 15, 
1864— discharged by General Order, July 3, 186;,. 

Died December i(\ 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 



70 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Name. 



Hart, Jacob 

Heinbaugh, John . . . 
Hoover, John 

Hartman, Aaron P.. 

Hcrner, Daniel J 

Harsberger, Jacob . . 

Hemminger, Alex.. . 

Kiramel, John 

Kreger, Jacob 

King, Harrison 

Levingsion, J. W... 
Levingsion, Levi . . . 



Lee, Perry. 

Miller, Gillian . . 
Miner, Martin . . 
Moure, Peter . . 
Miller, Daniel J 



May, Daniel 

Markel, Ringold. . 

Nedrow^, Joseph . . 
Nicola, Samuel ... 

Nicola, Simon 

Nickolson, Adam . 
Nicliler, William.. 



Nickler, David 

Pile, Peter 

Pile, George. . . 
Pile, William .. 
Pritts, Jacob. . . 



Rector, Washington 

Rose, Jackson 

Rayman, Jeremiah. . 
Rose, Henry 



Rose, John 

Shelly, Samuel. . . . 
Shaulis, Simon. . . . 
Stutzinan, Elias . . 

Sullivan, Irvin 

Smith, David 

Trimpey, John. . .. 

Vought, John 

Wable, Foster C. 

Welfley, Peter. . .. 
Weimer, David . . 
Voder, Samuel B. 
Zutal, Aaron . . 
Zufal, Jacob ... . 



Private. 
...do .. 
...do.. 



...do. 
...do, 
...do. 



...do. 

...do . 

...do 

...do. 

...do. 

...do. 



....do, 
,...do, 
. .. do, 
....do, 
....do. 



.do . 
.do, 

.do , 
.do , 
.do , 
.do, 
.do. 



...do, 
...do, 
...do, 
...do, 
...do. 



.do 
.do. 
.do 
.do 



...do, 
...do, 
...do . 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do . 
...do. 
...do 

...do 
. do 
. do 
...do. 
...do 



Mustered 


into Service. 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 26, 


■62, 


Aug. 25, 


62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 26, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


■62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


•62, 


Aug. 26 


'62, 


Aug. 26 


■62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


•62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


■62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


62, 


Aug. 25 


'62, 


Aug. 25 


■62, 


Aug. 25 


'62. 


Aug. 25 


■62, 


Aug. 26 


'62, 


Aug. 26 


'62, 


Aug. 26 


•62, 



Remarks. 



Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864— discharged 

by General Order, June 2, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged F"ebruary 23, 1864. 
Transferred to Co. I, 22d reg. V. R. C, Oct. 17, 1864— 

discharged by General Order, July 3, 1865. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, V'a., December 13, 1862. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Discharged April 22, 1863. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863— transferred 

to v. R. C— discharged July 17, 1865. 
Died May 27, 1864. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to Co. D, 18th reg. V. R. C, July 27, 1863 

— discharged by General Order, June 29, 1865. 
Died February 14, 1863. 
Killed at Petersburg. Va., April 2, 1865— buried in 

Poplar Grove Nat. Cem., div. D, sec. B, grave 43. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Absent, in hospital, at muster out. 
M ssing in action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1S64. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Died at Alexandria, Va., of wounds received at Fred- 
ericksburg, December 13, 1862. 
Deserted July 22, 1803. 
Absent, in hospital, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged January 26, 1864. 
Transferred to 96th Co., 2d batt., V. R. C, Dec. 17, 

1863— discharged by General Order, Aug. 24, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged December 23, 1863. 
Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps, Feb. 15, 1864. 
Transferred to Co. H, loth reg. V. R. C, Jan. 18, 1864 

— discharged by General Order, June 27, 1865. 
Died December 30, 1862. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Deserted October 2, 1862. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Died January 11, 1S63. 
Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864 — discharged 

by General Order, June 9, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Disch. tor wds. rec'd at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863. 
Mustered out with company, ^lay 20, 1S65. 
Di.scharged for wounds received at Fredericksburg, 

Va.. December 13, 1862. 



Company D. 



Adam Grimm. . 
Noah Bowman 



Samuel S. Swank.. 
Noah S. Miller 



Captain 

.. do .. 

ist Lt . . 

, . . . do . . . 



Aug. 29, 
Aug. 22, 

Aug. 29, 
Aug. 25, 



Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — discharged 

on Surgeon's certificate, April 17, 1864. 
Pr. to Sgt., August 27. 1862— to ist Sgt., Feb. i, 1863— 

to isi Lt.. July 31, 1S64— to Captain, Sept. 21, 1864 — 

wounded at Five Forks, Va., April i, 1S65 — absent, 

in hospital, at m-ister out. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1S63 — discharged 

Dy special order, February 12, 1864. 
Pr. to isi Sgt., Aug. 27, 1862— to 2d Lt., Jan. 11, 1863 — 

to 1st Lt. March 5, 1864 — com. Captain, April 20, 1864 

— not mustered— discharged by G. O., July 30, 1S64. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



71 



Na.me. 



Charles H. Ferner. 



Henry Stewart . . 
Oliver P. Shaver 



W. E. Zimmerman. . 
James F. Stanton . 



Noah Koontz ... 

Jacob G. Mishler 
Henry Mishler. .. 



Adara Shafer 
David Gohn . 



ist Lt . . 



2d Lt. , 
ist Sgt 



Sergeant 
....do ... 



Corporal 
do. . 



Wm. A. Johnson 

Charles Lohr 

David J. Levingston. 

Jacob Barnt 

Isaac Miller 

Noah W. Shafer 



Isaac N. Dibert. . . . 
Dallas M. Unger .. 
Ackerman, George 
Bissell, Emanuel. . . 

Bissell, John H 

Barnt, Charles 

Boyer, John .". . . . . 



Barnt, Levi 

Berkey, Joseph . . . 

Berkey, Obiah 

Barnt, Perry 

Caldenbaugh, Jos. 
Custer, Adam 

Crissey, Hezekiah 

Custer, Jonas 

Cook, Pirls 



Delany, Daniel . . . 

Dull, George 

Dickey, John 

Farrel, Leonard . 
Fry, Jeremiah . . . . 

Gohn, Noah 

Griffith, Wesley . 



Helsel, Edward. 
Horner, Henry . 
Helsel, Martin.. 



Hammer, Joseph D. 



Kimmel. Rash. . 
Lohr, Harrison 
Lohr, Benjamin 
Lohr, George.. . 



.do. 
.do, 



Lohr, Jqsiab. 



...do.. 
...do.. 
...do.. 
...do.. 
...do.. 
...do .. 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Musician 
do ... 
Private.. 
....do... 
....do ...1 
....do ... 
....do... 



...do, 

...do, 

...do, 

...do, 

...do 

...do. 



.do. 
.do . 
.do. 

.do. 
.do. 
.do, 
do, 
.do, 
.do, 
.do , 



.do., 
.do., 
.do.. 



.do., 
.do., 
.do .. 
.do.. 



Aug. 27. 



Aug. 29, 
Aug. 22, 



Aug. 22, 
Aug. 22, 



Aug. 22, 
Aug. 22, 

Aug. 22, 
Aug. 23, 

Aug. 23, 

Aug. 22. 



Aug. 27, 

Aug. 22, 

Aug. 22, 
Aug. 25, 
Aug. 22. 
Aug. 22, 
Aug. 22, 
Aug. 22, 
Aug. 22, 



Remakks. 



Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 27, '62, 
Aug. 27, 62, 



.do 



Aug. 27, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 

Aug. 27, '62, 
Aug. 23, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 

Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 27, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 



Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 22, '62, 
Aug. 27, '62, 

.\ug. 22, '62, 



Aug. 22, '62, 

-A.ug. 22, '62, 

Aug. 22, '62, 

Aug. 22, '62, 

Aug. 27, '62, 



Pr. ID Sergt. August 27, 1862— to ist Sgt. Aug. 1. 1864— 

to isi Lieut. Sept. 21, i864~mustered out with com- 
pany. May 2g, 1865. 
Discharged January 10, 1863. 
Pr. to Corporal, Aug. 27, 1862— to Sgt. Feb. i, 1863— to 

ist Sergt. Jan. i, 1S65— com. 2d Lieut. — not mustered 

— mustered out with company, May 29, 1S65. 
Pr. to Cor. August 27, iS62--to Sergt. Nov. 12, 1862— 

mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Pr. to Sergt. Aug. 27, 1862— captured at Chapel C. H., 

\'a., October i, 1864— discharged by General Order, 

June 13, 1865. 
Pr. to Corporal, March 12, i863--to Sgt. Nov. i, 1864— 

mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Pr. to Cor. Mar. 12, 1863— absent, sick, at muster out. 
Pr. to Cor. June 30, 1863— wounded at Dabney's Mills, 

Va., Feb. 6, 1865— discharged by G. O., May 13, 1865. 
Pr. to Cor. June 30, 1863— absent, sick, at muster out. 
Pr. to Cor. Nov. i, 1864— wounded at Dabney's Mills, 
Va., Feb. 6, 1865— absent, sick, at muster out. 
Promoted to Corporal, August 27, 1862— discharged on 

Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 8, 1864. 
Promoted to Corporal, August 27, 1862— discharged on 

Surgeon's certificate, April 8, 1S63. 
Pr. to Cor. June 30, 1863— discli.— date unknown— for 

wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Pr. to Cor. Sept. i, 1863- died at Washington, D. C, 

Tune 3, of wds. rec'd at Wilderness, Va., May 5, '64. 
Promoted to Corporal, Mar. 12, 1863— missing inaction 

at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Promoted to Corporal — date unknown — missing in 

action at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1S62. 
Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Deserted October 26, 1862. 
Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Mustered out with com'panv. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 24, 1863— 

burial record, died April 6, 1863— buried in Military 

Asylum Cemetery, D. C. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, June i, 1864. 
Missing in action at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, '62. 
Deserted September 3, 1862. 
Never mustered. 

Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Tr. to Co. C, i8th regiment V. R. C— discharged by 

General Order, July 10, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, June i, 1863. 
Tr. to Co. A, ist regiment V R. C, May 22, 1863— 

discharged by General Order, July 14, 1865. 
Musteredout with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, June 4, 1863. 
Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Died February 14, 1863. 
Died at Smoketown, Md., Dec. 16, 1862 — buried in 

National Cemetery, Antietam, section 26, lot B, 

grave 215. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Died at Washington, D. C, Jan. 11, '63— burial record, 

Dec. 24, 1862— buried in Military Asylum Cemetery. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863— died Sept. 

Q, 1863— buried in National Cemetery, Louden Park, 

JJaltimore, Md. 
Deserted October 4, 1S62. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps, Nov. 28, 1863. 
Died July 31, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July I, 1863. 
Deserted September 25, 1862. 



72 



ONE HUNDRED AND !< ORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Name. 



Miller, Isaiah 

Miller, Samuel J 

Miller, Josiah 

Miller, Christian M. 
Minor, Ephraim . . . . 

Miller, Henry J 

Miller, Renel 

Miller, Joseph . . . . . 
Miller, Gillian 



M'Kinley, Lee K. 



Pepley, David 

Rushcnberger, Jno. 
Ringler, Harrison . 

Reel, John 

Rodgcrs, William. 
Rodgers, Franklin 
Ripple, Valentine. . 
Rininger, William . 



Suter, William 

Speicher. William J . 

Swank, Jacob 

Summers, Joshua . . . 

Shafer, Adam B... 
Summers, Michael . . 
Statler, Hiram H. . . 

Sipe, Jacob 



Specht, Joseph _. 

Thomas, George C. 
Taft, James W 



Woods, John E. 
Wilt, Jeremiah. . 
Yoder, Isaac. . . . 



R.ANK. 



Private. 

...do .. 
. . . . do . . 
....do 
....do .. 
....do.. 
....do .. 
. . . . do . . 
. . . . do . . 



do 

.do, 
.do 
.do 
.do, 
.do 
.do 
.do 
do 

.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 

.do 
.do 



.do .. 
do ., 
.do .. 

.do .. 
.do ., 
do .. 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 27 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 27 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


•62, 


Aug. 22 


62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 27 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 27 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 27 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


'62, 


Aug. 22 


■62. 



Remarks. 



Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 18, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. May 14, 186^. 

Transferred to V. R. C, Nov. 7, 1864. 

Transferred to V. R. C, October 17, 1864 

Transferred to Signal Corps, Nov. 10 1863. 

Died November 19, 1864. 

Killed at hfatcher's Run, Va., Oct. 27, 1S64. 

Died July 29, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July I, 1863. 
Died Aug. 10, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July I, 1S63. 
Killed at Petersburg^, 'Va., June 24, 1864. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 
Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Tr. to Co. F, i8th reg. Veteran Reserve Corps, June i, 

1864 — disch. by General Order, June 27, 1S65. 
Absent, on detached service, at muster out. 
Discharged by General Order, June 20, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Wounded at Dabney's Mills, February 6, 1865 — absent, 

in hospital, at muster out. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 24, 1S63. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 10, 1864. 
Died July 2, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July I, 1863. 
Died at Washington, D. C, Jan. 17, 1863 — buried in 

Military Asylum Cemetery. 
Missing in action at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Tr. to Veteran Reserve Corps — date unknown. 
Died July 31, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July I, i863~buried in Nat. Cem., sec. B, grave 76. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Deserted September 25, 1862. 
Died at Belle Plain, Va., February 16, 1863. 



Company E. 



John A. Owens 

Charles R. Evans... 


Captain . 
...do ... 


Aug. 

Aug. 


30, '62, 
30, '62, 


Andrew G. Tucker . 


ist Lt. .. 


Aug. 


30. "62, 


Isaac S. Kerstetter . 


....do ... 


Aug. 


28, '62, 


Scott Clingan 


1st Sgt.. 


Aug. 


28, '62, 


Alfred Hayes 

Samuel Brown 


...do ... 
Sergeant 


Aug. 
Aug. 


28, '62, 
28, '62, 


John V. Miller 


...do ... 


Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 


28, '62, 

28, '62, 
28, '62, 


Reuben B. Fessler. . 
Thos. P. Wagner . . . 


...do ... 
....do... 


Thomas R. Orwig . . 
Isaac J. Kerstetter. . 


...do... 
Corporal 


Aug. 
Aug. 


28, '62. 
28, '62, 




....do . . 


Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 


28, '62, 

28, '62, 
28, '62, 




..do . .. 


Benj. W. Minium . . 


....do ... 


Henry C. Penny. . . 


... do ... 


Aug. 


28, '62, 



Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 29, 1864. 

Pr. fr. ist Lt. March 21, 1863— wd. at Gettysburg, Pa., 
July I, 1863 — mus. out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Promoted from 2d Lieut. March 21, 1863 — died July 5, 
of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Pr. to ist Sergt. Oct. 29, 1862 — to 2d Lieut. April 10, 
1863 — to ist Lieut. Nov. 16, 1863 — mustered out with 
company. May 29, 1865. 

Pr. to ist Sergt. April 10. 1863 — com. 2d Lieut. July 2, 
1863 — not mus. — wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 
1863 — mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Oct. 22, 1862. 

Promoted to Sergeant, October 29, 1862 — mustered out 
with company. May 29, 1865. 

Pr. to Sergt. Oct. 29, 1S62 — wounded at Cold Harbor, 
Va., June 2, '64— mustered out with Co., May 29, '65. 

Pr. to Sgt. June i, 1863 — mus. out with Co. May 29, '65. 

Captured at Chapel C. H., \'a., October i, 1864 — dis- 
charged by General Order, May 29, 1865. 

Died at Washington, D. C, November 30, 1862. 

Pr. to Cor. Oct. 29, 1862 — wd. at Spottsylvania C. K. , 
Va., May 12, '64 — mus. out with Co., May 29, i86s. 

Pr. to Cor. Oct. 29, 1S62 — wd. at Fredericksburg, Va., 
Dec. 13, 1862 — mustered out with Co., May 29, 1865. 

Pr. to Cor. March, 1864 — mus. out with Co. May 29, '65. 

Promoted to Corporal, June 8, 1864 — mustered out with 
company. May 29, 1865. 

Captured at Chapel C. H., Va., October i, 1864 — dis- 
charged by General Order, May 29, 1865. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



12> 



Name. 



John H. Martin. 
William Keifer . 




I Corporal 



Nathaniel Strahan 
Henry M. Speicht. 

Jacob H. Rankes . 



Samuel Mover 

William Gcibcl 

Hunter B. Barton. . . 
Ammon, William L. 



Armagast, Peter. 
Baker, George. . . 



Boyer, Solomon. 



Boope, George E. 



Campbell, Reuben... 
Donachy, William L. 

Deibert, John P 

Bellinger, John S. . . . 

Fetter, Adam 

Fangboner, Theo. . . . 
Fullmer, William H.. 

Fees, David 

Farley. John. 



Fetler, David. 



Gellinger, Jackson. . 
Gibboney, Jacob B., 
Gundy, James P 



Hoffman, Noah 

Hoffman, Henry W. 

Hoffman, Jolin 

Hartman, Har'n R.. 



Hoffman, Solomon B. 
Houghton, Thomas.. 

Jamison, David 

Koser, l^riah 



Koser, William 
Kline, John. . . 



Kling, John 

LeFevre, Frank P. 
Lcnhart, Jacob . . . . 

Marr, James 

Moyer, John N.. . . 



Moser, Jacob . . . . 
Moser, Jeremiah. 



Martin, Henry. 

Martin, Daniel. 
Moyer, Levi H. 



Minium, 'John \. . . . 
Morns, A. Judson... 



...do 
...do 



Musician 
...do ... 
Private. 



.do ., 
.do.. 



.do .. 



.do 
do , 
.do. 
.do. 
.do . 
.do, 
.do , 
.do . 
.do . 



...do, 
...do , 
...do , 



.do, 
.do , 
.do 
.do 



..do 
..do 
..do 
..do , 



...do 
...do 



.do 
.do 
.do , 



.do 
do 



.do 
.do 



do 
.do 



. do , 
do 



Mustered 
mto Service 



Aug. 28 

Aug. 2S 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 



Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
.•\ug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 



Aug. 2! 



Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 

Aug. 28. 

Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 



Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 



Remarks. 



Disch. Jan. 8, 1863, for wounds received at Fredericks- 
burg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — tr. to Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps, March iS, 1864. 

Tr. to \^eteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 30, 1863. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — tr. to Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps, February 15, 1864. 

Died June i, of vi-ounds received at Spottsylvania C. 
H., Va., May 12, 1864— buried in National Cemetery, 
Arlington. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. May 16, 1S63. 

Discharged January 16, 1865, for wounds received at 
Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Wounded at North Anna River, Va., May 23, 1864— 
absent, in hospital, at muster out. 

Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec, 13, 1862, and 
at Spottsylvania C. H., May 10, 1864— mustered out 
with company. May 20, 1865. 

Transferred to 51st company, 2d battalion. Veteran 
Reserve Corps, November 15, 1863 — discharged by 
General Order, Aug. 28, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 2g, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Killed at Catlctl's Station, Va., Nov. 30, 1863. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged April 8, 1864, for wounds received at Fred- 
ericksburg, Va., December 13, 1S62. 

Died of wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., 
December 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. May ig, 1863. 

Discharged May 5, 1863, for wounds received at Fred- 
ericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged February 28, 1863, for wounds received at 
Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Discharged April 13, 1863, for wounds received at 
Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863— discharged 
on Surgeon's certificate, September 4, 1S64. 

Died of wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., 
Decembe' 13, 1862. 

Discharged April g, 1863, for wounds received at 
Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Died at Warrenton, Va., November, 1862. 

Died of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 
1864. 

Died at Acquia Creek, Va., Jan. 22, 1863. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 19, 1864. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Discharged January 29, 1863, for wounds received at 
Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., June i, 1864. 

Died of wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., 
December 13, 1S62. 

Died at Sharpsburg, Md., Nov. 24, 1862— buried in 
National Cemetery, Antietam, section 26, lot B, 
grave 224. 

Died of wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., 
December 13, 1862. 

Died of wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., 
December 13, 1862. 

Captured at Wilderness. Va., May 5, 1864. 

Dropped from rolls— date unknown. 



74 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Name. 



Rank. 



M'Bride, Daniel I Private.. 



Pontius, Henry B. 
Reichley, George. 
Reish, George . . . . 
liaboss, John 



Rank, Samuel 

Kenner. William L 
Raboss, Henry . . , 



Renner, Levi 



Root, David 

Smith, Henry M. 



Sechler, William R. 

Shaffer, Jeremiah. . . 
Shovvalter, John W. 
Sleinmetz, Philip . . . 



Smith, Henry C . 
Smith, Jilichael .... 
Sraham, James C . 
Shields, William . . 
Stettler, Henry .... 

Stapleton, George . 

Stuck, Henry 

Stitzer, Samuel 



Sortman, Daniel. . 
Wolfe, Emanuel , 
Wilson, Robert M. 

Wolfe, William H. 

Wynn, Thomas . . . 



.do .. 
.do .. 
.do .. 
do .. 

.do .. 
.do .. 
• do .. 



.do 

do , 



.do , 
.do , 
.do 

do 

.do 

do 

do , 
.do , 

.do, 

do , 

.do, 

.do , 
do , 
do 

.do , 

.do 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Aug. 28, '62, 



Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 



Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 



Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 



Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 2,8 
Aug. 28 

.\U!,'. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28, 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 

Aug. 28 



Remarks. 



Discharged January 24, 1863, for wounds received at 
Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged Feb. 26, 1865, for wounds received at 
Petersburg, Va., June, 1864. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 14, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 4. 1863. 

Accidentally killed, March 24, 1865— buried in Poplar 
Grove, National Cemetery, Petersburg, Va., division 
C, section H, grave 31. 

Died at Richmond, Va., February 23, 1S63, of wounds 
received at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Died at Gettysburg, Pa , July 3, 1863. 

Wounded at Chapel C. H., Va., Oct. i, 1864— mustered 
out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Wounded at Spottsylvania C. H., Va., May 10, 1864 — 
mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged May 9, 1863, for wounds received at Fred- 
ericksburg, Va.. December 13, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 20, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 9, 1864. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. Feb. 19, 1863. 

Promoted to Sergeant Major, March i, 1864. 

Died at Washington, D. C., October 12, 1862— burial 
record, Oct. 7, 1S64 — buried in Military Asylum Cem. 

Died July 26, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 
July I, 1863. 

Died of wounds received at Fredericksburg, Va., 
December 13, 1862. 

Died at Washington, D. C, May 30, of wounds re- 
ceived at North Anna River, Va., May 23, 1864 — 
buried in National Cemetery, Arlington. 

Deserted December 15, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862 — 
mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862 — 
transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, July 21. 1863. 

Deserted December 15, 1862. 



Company F. 



Fran's A. Edmonds. . I Captain . ' Aug. 25, '62, 

Albert Heffley j .... do ... ' Aug. 25, '62, 

Josiah Lepley ist Lt. . . Aug. 25, '62, 



George J. Gordill. 
Cyrus P. Heffley.. 



Jacob J. Zorn. . . 
Jacob B. Lepley 



John Denton.. 
Martin Caion. 
Samuel Hoon. 



Parker Diveley , 



Joseph Smith 

Jacob W^ellington 



2d Lt.. . .^ug. 25, "62, 

. . .do . . . Aug. 25, '62, 



ist Sgt. 
...do.. 



Henry Stuck. 



Sergeant 
. . . do . . 
....do... 



.do. 



....do ... 
Corporal 



.Aug. 25, '62, 

Aug. 25, '62, 

Aug. 25, '62, 
Aug. 25, '62, 
Aug. 25, '62, 

Aug. 25, '62, 

Aug. 25, '62, 
Aug. 25, '62, 



.do ... 1 Aug. 25, '62, 



Discharged November i, 1862. 

Pr. fr. ist Lt., Nov. 1, '62— disch. by G. O., May 19, '65. 

Promoted from private, April 9, 1863 — com. Capt.— 

not mus. — mus. out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Com. ist Lt. Nov. I, '62— not mus. — disch. Mar. n, '63, 

for wds. reed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Pr. fr. Cor. to Sgt. Sept. i, '62— to 2d Lt. Apr. 19. 1863— 

captured — returned — wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July I, 1863— discharged by S. O., May 15, 1865. 
Pr. fr. Sgt. May 25, 1864 — com. ist Lt.— not mustered — 

mustered out with company. May 29, 1S65. 
Died May 24, of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., 

May 5, 1864. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Pr. fr. Cor. Nov. 27, 1863— com. 2d Lt. — not mustered 

— mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Pr. to Cor. November 27, 1863 — to Sgt. Oct. 22, 1864 — 

mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Deserted October i, 1862. 
Pr. to Cor. Nov. 27, 1863 — pris. from May 5, 1864, to 

Feb. 28, 1865— discharged by G. O. June 5. 1865. 
Pr. to Cor. Oct. 22, '64— mus. out with Co., May 29, '65. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



75 



Name. 



Benjamin Hay 

Samuel Boose . 
Chauncey Dickey 
Adam Cook .... 
Samuel J. Bittner. 



Hermon Fritz 



Henry Bittner 

Hiram Sturtz 
Christopher Speicher 
Hermon Johnson . 
Charles Flato. . 
William H. Platte . 
Atchison, William . . 

Bowman, Chauncey. 
Beal, Jacob N . 
Blachart, Jeremiah.. 
Bndegum, Henry. 
Bisel, Benjamin . . . 

Brausfher, Jeremiah. 
Hroucher, Gillian . . 
Boyer, Anthony . . 

Chnstner, Jacob . 
Caton, William . 
Caton, Elias . 
Coleman, Francis 
Dickey, William. . 
Dickey, Alexander. 

Exline, Emanuel. . 
Fogle, George. 
Fisher, Tobias- . . . 

Fritz, Uriah ... 



Glessner, George . 
Griffith, Andrew. 
Groff, John A 
Heffley, Zacharias 
Heckman, Daniel. 

Hay, John 

Hoover, Charles. . 
Hittie, William . 
Hay, Henry ... . 

Hogle, Francis . . 
Hartz, Henry 

Hentz, William . 

Hersh, Francis 
Keller, Joshua. 

Keller, Justus. . 
Leidig, William M 
Leidig, Jonathan 
Murdic, Alexander 
Mosnolder. Joseph 
Muhlenberg, Chas 
Miller, Charles. 
Mason, Joseph E 

Mull, Peter 

Miller, Joseph . 
Parker, Andrew . 
Queer, Levi 
Ringler, Alexander 
Rumiser, HcT-y . 

Ravman, William 



Corporal 

. ...do . 

do 

...do . 

...do.. 

. . . do . . • 



Mustered 
into Service 



. do... 

do . 

do . . 
Musici'n 
. do . 

..do . 
Private.. 

do .. 

. do . 
. do .. 

. do . 
..do. 

.. do . 
.do . . 
. do . . 

.do. 

.do . 

. do. 

. do . 

do . 

. . do. . 

do . . 
. do 
...do . 



.do 
do 
do 
do 

.do 

.do 
do 
do 

.do 

do 
.do 



.do 
.do 

.do 
.do 
do 
do 
.do 
do 
do 
do 
.do 
.do 
do 
do 
do 
.do 



Aug. 29, 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Sept. 9 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 29 
Sept. 18 

Aug. 25 
Sept. 9 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 29 

Aug 25 
Aug 25, 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 

Aug. 29 
Aug. 25 

Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 29 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 
Aug. 25 



Aug. 25. 62 



Remarks. 



Pr. to Cor. Oct. 22, 1864 — wounded at Five Forks, Va., 
April I, 1865— discharged by G. O., June 3, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Nov. 17, 1862. 

Pr. to Cor. Nov. 27, 1863— disch. by G. O., May 17, '6-. 

Tr. to V^eteran Reserve Corps, July 27, 1863. 

Transferred to Company D, nth reg. X . R. C, May 2. 
1864 — discharged by General Order. July 7, 1865. 

Died December 14, of wounds received at Fredericks 
burg, Va.. Dec. 13, 1862 

Died at Warrenton, Va., November 14. 1862. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Deserted January 21, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 19, 1863. 

Captured— died at Andersonville, Ga., Jan. 25, 1865— 
grave 12520. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Absent, sick, at muster out. 

Discharged on Surgeon s certificate. Dec. 13, 1864. 

Tr. to Veteran Reserve Corps — date unknown. 

Captured — died at Andersonville, Ga., Oct. 22, 1864 — 
grave 11222. 

Deserted January 20, 1863. 

Deserted January 20, 1863. 

Transferred to Vet Reserve Corps — dale unknown- 
discharged by General Order, June 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec 13, 1864. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va , Dec. 13, 1862. 

Killed at Spottsylvania C. H., Va , May n, 1864. 

Mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 

Transferred to Co. K, 14th reg. Vet. R. C— date un 
known — disch by General Ord<;r, June 28. 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 7, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Prisoner from August 21. 1864, to March 2, 1865 — dis- 
charged by General Order. June 6, 1865. 

Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., July , 1863 — died at 
Andersonville, Ga , Oct. ig, 1864. 

Discharged by General Order, May 25, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. Mar. 16, 1863. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, July 24, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March g, 1863. 

Discharged by General Order, May 17, 1865. 

Discharged by General Order, May 17, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon s certificate, Sept. 12, 1863. 

Tr. toCo. F, 9th reg. Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 29, 1863— 
discharged by General Order, June 26, 1865. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, July 24, 1863. 

Tr. to Co. 1, 4th reg. Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 21. 1865 — 
discharged by Geopral Order, July 15, 1865. 

Tr. to Co. B, 14th reg. Vet. Res. Corps, Sept. 18, 1864 
—discharged by General Order/ July 21, 1865. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Captured— died at Andersonville, Ga., Oct. 19, 1864 — 
bu. in Lawton Nat. Cem., Millen, sec. A, grave 274. 

Transferred to Signal Corps, October. 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Transferred to X'eteran Reserve Corps, Jan. i, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1S65. 

Mustered out with compiany. May 29, 1S65. 

Mustered out with company. May 29. 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, July 7, 1864. 

Promoted to Hospital Steward, May i, 1863. 

Died at Brooks' Station, Va., Nov. 25, 1862. 

Deserted October t, 1862. 

Killed at Dabney's Mills, Va., February 6, 1865. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Tr to Co. C, 24th reg. Vet. Res. Corps, July i, 1864 — 
discharged by General Order, June 28, 1865. 

Killed at Dabney's Mills, Va., February 6, 1865. 



76 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Mustered 
into Service. 


Ream, Michael 


Private.. 


Aug. 25, 


"62, 


Ream, Joseph 


..do.. 


Aug. 25, 


"62, 


Suder, Henry 


..do .. 


Aug. 29, 


'62, 


Shoemaker, James. . . 


. ..do . 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Spangy, Wilham 


. do . . 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Sweitzer, James . ... 


. do . 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Shoemaker, Anan's. 


. . do . . 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Sellers, Augustus 


. do .. 


Aug. 25, 


■62, 


Steinberg, Moses 


do 


Aug. 25, 


62, 


Scritchtield, Jesse. . . 


...do . 


Aug. 25. 


62, 


Shafer, John 


.. do. 


Aug. 29, 


■62, 


Sivits, Joseph 


. do. 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Stewart, Henry . . 


... do . . 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Schram, Henry 


.. do . 


Aug. 25, 


■62, 


Steiner, John 


. -do.. 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Slaybauch. Henry . 


. .do. 


Sept. Q, 


'64, 


Walker, Zachariah. . 


do . 


Aug. 25, 


'A2, 


Walker, Joseph 


..do. 


Aug. 25, 


•62, 


Weimer, John 


. do. 


Aug. 25, 


■6.7, 


Will, Charles J 


. do . 


Aug. 25, 


'62, 


Will, George 


do .. 


Aug. 25, 


■62, 


Wol ford. John. 


...do.. 


Aug. 25. 


62, 


Ware, Henry 


do . 


Aug. 29, 


'62, 



REiMARKS. 



Tr. to 169th Co., 2d batt., V. R. Corps, Mar. 27, 1864- 

discharged by General Order, July 3, 1865. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Absent, sick, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered > 1 1 with company. May 29, 1865. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Deserted Nov. 18. 1862. 
Deserted October i, 1862. 
Deserted August 25, 1863. 
Never joined company. 
Absent, sick, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out wuh company, May 29. 1865. 
Tr. to Co. D, iSth reg V. R. Corps, August 15, 1863- 

discharged by General Order, June 20, 1865. 
Tr. to Co. B, luth reg. Vet. Res. Corps, Sept lo, 1864- 

discharged by General Order, July 13, 1865. 
Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps. March 28, 1865- 

discharged by General Order, July 28, 1865. 



Company G. 



Wm. K. Haviland. 

Cicero H. Drake. 

Charles P. Orvis. 

B. T. Huntsman. 

George La Bar 
Josiah Heckman. 



Amzi La Bar 
Jacob F. William 



Captain .| Aug. 3 

do I Aug. 3 

ist Lt.. I Aug. 3 

I 
. . do Aug. 3 



2d Lt.. 

isl Sgt. 



.do 
do . 



Aaron Smith Sergeant 

Levi C. Drake do . . 

1 

John R. Miller j do. . 

Jackson Eberitt .... I . do . 



Aug. 3 
Aug. 3 



Aug. 3 
Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 



Peter F. Wagner . . ; Corporal | Aug. 3 

Justus Gimble do . . I Aug. 3 

Henry Palmer ...... . do . . Aug. 3 



Matthew G. Allegar. 

Edward Brandis 

Jas. D. Connelly. . . 

Theodore Fenner . . 



James Ferguson. . 

Jervis Ney 

N. S. Vanauken . 



do 
do 



do 
do 



Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 
Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 



Aug. 3 

Aug. 3 
Aug. 3 



Transferred to 14th reg. Vet. Reserve Corps, May i, 

1863 — discharged August 20, 1866. 
Pr. from Sgt. 10 2d Lt. April i, 1863— to Capt. May 13, 

1865— mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Com. Captain, Dec. 14, 1863— n >t mustered— promoted 

to Adjutant, December 19, 186:1. 
Promoted from Sergeant to 1st Lieut. May 3, 1864 — 

mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 
Discharged by special order, October 24, 1862. 
Pr. to Cor. May 20, 1863— to Sgt. Dec. 30, 1863— to 1st 

Sergt. F"eb. 6, 1865 — com. 2d Lieut. — not mustered — 

mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, July 1, 7863. 
Pr. to Sergt. May 25, 1863 — to ist Sgt. June 30, 1864 — 

killed at Dabney's Mills, Va., February 6, 1865. 
Pr. to Cor. May 29, 1863 — to Serg'. October 31, 1864 — 

mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Pr. to Cor. Dec. 30, 1863— to Sergeant Oct. 31, 1864 — 

mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 
Pr. to Cor. March 18, 1864— to Sergeant Feb. 28, 1865— 

mustered out with company. May 29, iS6=;.* 
Discharged January 22, 1865, for wounds received at 

North Anna River, Va., May 23, 1864. 
Pr. to Cor. Oct. 31, '64— mus. out with Co., May 29, '65. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Nov. 13, 1863. 
Pr. to Cor. May 25, 1863 — wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July T, 1863— tr. to 3d Co., 2d batt., V. R. C— date 

unknown — discharged August 16, 1865. 
Pr. to Cor. May 25, 1863— died August 6, of wounds 

received at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Promoted to Corporal, May 25, 1863— killed at Gettys- 
burg, Pa., July I, 1863. 
Died at Washington, D. C, Jan. 12, 1863, of wounds 

received at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862 — 

buried in Military Asylum Cemetery. 
Died at Washington, D. C, Jan. 29^ 1863, of wounds 

received at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Died at Brooks' Station, Va... Nov. 25, 1862. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



11 



Name. 



Oliver Pitney 

John B. Lawrence , 

Silas Hanna 

Arnst, .lames D. 
Amick, Daniel . 
Blowers, Elijah . 
Benson, Peter .... 
Bellis, Linford D.. 




Bellis, Lewis 

Bradshaw, James. 
Burch, Edwin . . . . 

Bensley, Charles.. 



Bellis, Amos 

Compton, John 

Countryman, Dan'l. 



Crock, William T.. 
Connelly, Philip D. 
Delong, Elmer H . . 
Devitt, William D. 
Ebentt, Edwin R. . 



Feller, Balser 

Frable, James 

Fenner, Jeffrey 

Gearhart, Edwin R. 
Garris, Amos 



Hoover, James 
Howey, Moses. 
Howey, Amos . 
Huff, James ... 



Hull, Benjamin... 
Hickman, Jos. F. . 
Jaggers, Joseph L. 
Knecht, Jacob 



.do , 
do , 



Kresge, Steward . . 
Kresge, Joseph . . . 



Knecht, Henry 
Layton, Morris H. 
La Bar, Levi . . . . 
La Bar, Linford . . 
Meeker, David H . 



.do . 
.do . 
.do . 

.do. 
.do . 
.do. 

do . 

do . 

.do-. 

do. 

do . 
.do . 
.do. 

.do . 
.do . 
.do . 
.do . 

.do. 
.do . 
.do. 
.do. 



Metz, John 

Marsh, Abraham B. 
Nuttall, Joseph 



.do 
.do 
do 
.do 
.do 

.do 
.do 
.do 



Neauman, Thos. W. 
Neauman, Charles . . 
Overleigh, Albert. . . 



Row, Philip 

Rinker, Joseph . . 
Shinnerling, C. F. 
Small, John 



Smith, Omer B. . . . 
Smith, George, Jr. 



.do., 
.do .. 
.do .. 



Stein, Ephraim . . 
Strunk, Theodore. 
Strunk, Jeremiah . 



.do . 
.do . 
do . 
.do . 

.do. 
.do . 

.do. 
.do. 
.do . 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Sept. 16, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


'62, 
'62, 
'62, 

'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62. 
'62, 


Aug. 31, 


'62, 


Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


'62, 
'62, 


Aug. 31, 


'62, 


bJD bi bjD 

3 3 3 
<<< 


'62, 
'62, 
•62, 


Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62, 


Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
"62, 


Aug. 31, 
Mar. 16, 
Mar. 16, 
Mar. 16, 


'62, 
'64, 

'64, 


Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


•62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62, 


Aug. 31, 


'62, 


Aug. 31, 


'62, 


Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Mar. 16, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


'62, 
'62, 
'64, 
'62, 
'62, 


Feb. 24, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


'64, 
62, 
'62, 


Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31. 
Aug. 31, 


•62, 
■62, 
'62, 


Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62, 


Aug. 31, 
Aug. 31, 


'62, 

'62, 


Aug. 8, 
Mar. 8, 
Aug. 31, 


'64, 

•64, 
62, 



Remarks. 



Deserted December 8, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Discharged by special order, .Sept. 9, 1864. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Wounded at Dabney's Mills, Va., Feb. 6, 1865 — absent, 

in hospital, at muster out. 
Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862 — 

absent, sick, at muster out. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. May 2, 1863. 
Tr. to Co. D, nth reg. V. R. C, November 13, 1863 

discharged by General Order, July 7, 1865. 
Died at Washington, D. C, January 12, 1863 — buried 

in Military Asylum Cemetery. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Discharged on Surgeon s certificate, Feb. 11, 1863. 
Tr. to 75th Co., 2d batt., V. R. C, September 23, iSr^-- 

discharged by General Order, June 28, 1865. 
Captured— died at Annapolis, Md., Dec. 30, 1864. 
Deserted July, 1863. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Wounded at Dabney's Mills, Va., Feb. 6, 1865— absent, 

in hospital, at muster out. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, June 2, 1863. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Died — date unknown. 

Transferred to Signal Corps — date unknown. 
Died at Alexandria, Va., January 12, 1863, of wounds 

rec'd at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862 — grave 679. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to 190th regiment P. V., May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to 190th regiment P. V., May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to 190th regiment P. V., May 29, 1865 

discharged by General Order, June 10, 1865. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Died—date unknown. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Captured at Boydton Plank Road, Va., Mar. 31, 1865 — 

discharged by General Order, June 3, 1865. 
Discharged October 25, 1864, for wounds received at 

Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Died May 30, of wounds received at Wilderness, Va , 

May 6, 1S64 — buried in Nat. Cem., Arlington. 
Missing in action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. 
•Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps — date unknown. 
Transferred to 190th regiment P. V., May 29, 1865. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Wounded at Wilderness, Va., May s, 1864 — absent, in 

hospital, at muster out. 
Transferred to 190th regiment, P. V., May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps, Sept. 30, 1863. 
Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863 — wounded 

at Five Forks, Va., April i, 1865— mustered out with 

company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Disch. on Surg, cert., Jan. 12, 1864 — re-enlisted March 

21, 1864— mis. in action at Wilderness, V^a., May 6, 

1864 — died at Annapolis, Md., Dec. 19, 1864. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Deserted October 9, 1862. 
Mustered out with company May 29, 1865. 
Captured at Boydton Plank Road, Va., Mar. 31, 1865 — 

discharged by General Order, June 3, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Deserted October g, 1S62 — returned October 9, 1864 - 

mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to 190th regiment, P. V ., May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to 128th Co., 2d batt., V. R. C, June 15, 

1864 — discharged by (jeneral Order, June 29, 1865. 



78 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT.- 



Name. 



Rank. 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Strunk, Elijah . . 
.Smiley, Thomas , 



Shafer, Henry 

Slutter, Henry 

Terry, Charles 

Transue, Ananias. . . 
Transue, George W. 

Tittle, Jerome 

Vanauken, Moses D. 
Vanrohy, Wm. H . . . 
Wallace, Charles B . 
Woolbert, Jacob . . . . 

Woolbert, Thomas. . 

Wilson, James 

Wells, William F.... 



White, Charles S. . . 
Woolbert, Jacob T. 



Private. 
. ...do .. 



.do , 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 

.do 



Mar. 8, '64 
Aug. 31, '62 

Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 

Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 
Aug. 31, '62 

Aug. 31, '62 

Aug. 31, '62 



Transferred to 190th regiment P. V., May 29. 1865. 
Died at Washington, l5. C, December 30, of wounds 

received at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Died January 2, 1863. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 21, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 24, 1863. 
Died December 22, 1862. 
Deserted — date unknown. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps, Sept. 22, 1864. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Wounded at Boydton Plank Road, Va., March 31, 1865 

— absent, in hospital, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to U. S. Navy, March 28, 1864. 
Transferred to Co. F, 3d reg. Vet. Reserve Corps — 

date unknown — discharged July 6, 1865. 
Died at Washington, D. C., Jan. 26, 1863, of wounds 

received at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 



Company H. 



Joshua M. Dushane. 

Daniel W. Dull 

George H. Collins . . 



Hugh Cameron . 
Joseph F. Forrey 



Wm. F. Kurtz . 
Samuel Wilson 



John V. Stouffer. 
James X. Walter. 



David B. Hood ... 
Samuel H. Dull... 
Robinson Balsley . 
Joseph R. Brown . 



Joseph Balsley. . 
William Whaley , 



Romanus Dull 

Frederick Shearer. 

James D. Connell. . 

James Mitts 

Levi Firestone 



Strickler Demuth 



Richard Evans.. . . 

William Helms 

Edward Y. White. 
William H. Shaw . 

Abraham Eicher. . 



Henry Kurtz 

Winfield S. Hood 



Isaac Francis, Jr do 



Captain, 
ist Lieut 

...do ... 



2d Lieut 
ist Sergt 



...do . 

Sergeant 



.do., 
.do .. 



. .do .. 
..do .. 
..do.. 
..do .. 



.do .. 
do.. 



....do... 
Corporal 

....do ... 

....do ... 

. ...do ... 

....do ... 



do .. 
.do .. 

do .. 
.do .. 

.do .. 

.do., 
.do .. 



Josiah R. Balsley .... I ... .do . . 



Aug. 18, '62, 
Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 19, '62 

Aug. 19, '62 



Aug. 18, 
Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 
Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19. 
Aug.' 19, 

Aug. iQ, 
Aug. 27, 
Aug. 19, 
Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 
Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 

Aug. 19, 
Aug. 19, 
Aug. 19, 
Aug. 19, 



Aug. 19, '62 



Aug. 19. 
Aug. 19. 



Aug. 19, '62, 



Discharged by General Order, Miy 15, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. May 26, 1863. 

Pr. from isl Sergt. to 2d Lt., April 10, 1863— to ist Lt., 
June 28, 1863— killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, '64. 

Promoted from ist Sergeant to 2d Lieutenant, July i, 
1863 — to ist Lt. June 26, 1864— died at City Point, 
Va., Feb. 15, 1865, of wounds received in action. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Mar. 7, 1863. 

Pr. to Cor. June i, 1863 — to Sergt. iVIar. i, 1864 — to ist 
Sgt. April I, 1864 — mus. out with Co., May 29, 1865, 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Wounded at Petersburg, Va., April i, 1865 — discharged 
by General Order, June 3, 1865. 

Discharged by General Order, May 17, 1865. 

Pr. to Corporal, Sept. i, 1864— to Sergeant February 6, 
1865 — mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 16, 1863. 

Promoted to Sergeant Major — date unknown. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May i, 1864. 

Transferred to 42d Co., 2d batt., Veteran Reserve 
Corps, Feb. i, 1865 — discharged .\ug. 19, 1S65. 

Died December 24, of wounds received at Fredericks- 
burg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Died July 27, of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., 
July I, 1863. 

Captured -died at Richmond, Va.. March 4, 1865. 

M^ounded at Petersburg, Va., April i, i865--discharged 
by General Order, June 3, 1865. 

Wounded at Petersburg, Va., March 29, 1865 — dis- 
charged by General Order, June 3, 1865. 

Promoted to Corporal, March 14, 1864 — mustered out 
with company, May 29, 1865. 

Wounded at Petersburg, Va., Apr. i, 1865 — discharged 
by General Order, June 27, 1865. 

Promoted to Corporal, March i, 1865 — mustered out 
with company, May 29, 1865. 

Discharged February 26, 1863. 

Discharged March 10, 1863. 

Discharged by General Order, May 15, 1865. 

Tr. to Co. E, 9th reg. V. R. C, October 30, 1863— dis- 
charged by General Order, June 29, 1865. 

Tr. to Co. D, nth reg. V. R. C, October 30, 1863— dis- 
charged by General Order, July 7, 1865. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, October 17, 1863. 

Tr. to sist Co., 2d batt.. Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. 
2, 1865 — discharged by G. O.. July 20, 1865. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



79 



Name. 



David R. Gallatin... 

Artis, Jacob 

Artis, William A 

.Artis, William 

Balsby. David 

Bigham, David 

Cooper, Husing' 

Collins, Ale.xander. . 



Corporal 
Private. . 
. ...do ... 
....do... 
....do... 
...do ... 
....do... 
....do... 



Clark, Jacob 

Coughenour, Jos 

Cunningham, Thad.. 

Coolev. lames 

Dull, Walter 

Durbin, Stewart 

Eaglen, John W 

Francis, John C 

Firestone, Hawkins.. 
Freeman, Leroy W.. 

Helms, Gibson 

Hall, Garrett 

Heffly, Samuel 

Hodge, Josiah 

Harvey, William H.. 

Hart, Joshua M 

Ingraham, Jesse 

Johnston, Lloyd 

Johnston, Jos. W. ... 

Kern, John H 

Kimmel, Singleton. . , 
Kooser, Ale.xander. . 

Kerr, Isaac 

Loughrey, Henry 

Loughrey, John 

May, Leonard 

Mitts. John 

Miller,' William ..,.., 
Martin, Frederick . . 
Morris, Nathan W.. 



M'Laughlin, Rob't.. 

Nicholson, Henry. . . 

Ober, Jacob 

Porter, Wm. H 

Rowen, John 

Ridenour, Wm 



Rist. Conrad F 

Ridenour, Jeremiah. . 
Robbins, Matthew. . . 

Rugg, Gabriel 

Stoner, Levi 



Sheppard, Wm. H 



Shisley, Wm 

Saylor, Jacob 

Stouffer, John B 

Shallenberger, L. W. 

Vance, Clayton 

Williams, Wm 

Whitly, Charles H... 

Walker, Jacob O 

Whipkey, Wm. H.... 



..do , 

..do. 

..do. 

..do , 

..do. 

..do. 

..do. 

..do , 

..do. 

..do . 

. do , 

..do, 

..do. 

.do, 

..do , 

. do 

..do 

..do 

..do 

..do , 

. do 

. do 

..do 

..do 

..do 

..do 

..do 

..do 

..do 

..do 



.do , 
.do . 
.do , 
.do, 
.do, 

.do , 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Aug. 


iq, 


'62, 


Aug. 


26, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Sept. 


10, 


'62, 


Aug. 


iQ, 


62, 


Sept. 


10, 


'62, 


Aug. 


10, 


'62, 


Sept. 


2, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IP, 


■62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


10, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


■62, 


Aug. 


26, 


'62, 


Aug. 


19, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


lO, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Sept. 


20, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Mar. 


SO, 


'64, 


Aug. 


n, 


■64, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


26, 


'62, 


Sept. 


20, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


26, 


'62, 


Aug. 


26, 


'62, 


Sept. 


2, 


'62. 


Sept. 


10, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


19, 


'62, 


Aug. 


19, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


'62, 


Aug. 


26, 


'62, 


Aug. 


26, 


•62, 


Aug. 


26, 


'62, 


Aug. 


26, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


■62, 


Aug. 


20, 


'62, 


Sept. 


2, 


'62, 


Aug. 


IQ, 


■62, 


Aug. 


19, 


■62, 



Remarks. 



.do ... I Aug. 19, '62, 



...do, 

...do, 

...do, 

. .do, 

..do 

...do , 

...do 

...do 

...do 



Aug. 19, 
Sept. 20, 
Aug. 19, 
Aug. 19, 
Aug. 19, 
Sept. 20, 
Aug. T9, 
Aug. 19, 
Sept. 20, 



Deserted February 8, 1863. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, August i, 1863. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, January i, 1865. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. , 

Discharged by General Order, May 13, 1865. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — absent, in 
hospital, at muster out. 

Mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 

Discharged December 15, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 6, 1863. 

Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged February 9, 1863. 

Died March 11, 1863. 

Discharged by General Order, June 15, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Died Nov. 11, 1864, of wounds received inaction. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 186s. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Discharged June 21, 1863. 

Died November 20, 1863. 

Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Deserted January, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged — date unknown. 

Killed at Five Forks, V'a., April i, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 

Discharged January 9, 1863. 

Died November 30, 1862. 

Killed at Spottsylvania C. H., Va., May 12, 1864. 

Discharged May, 1865. 

Died January 9, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out w-ith company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged March 24, 1864. 

Transferred to V'eieran Reserve Corps, April 27, 1865 — 
discharged by General Order, June 26, 1865. 

Died June 7, of wounds rec'd at Spottsylvania C. H., 
Va., May 11, '64 — buried at Ale.xandria, grave 2061. 

Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 

Deserted July i, 1863. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, I-'a., July i, 1863 — absent, in 
hospital, at muster out. 

Discharged by General Order, May 15, 1865. 

Discharged February 28, 1863. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, \'a., Dec. 13, 1S62. 

Deserted November 4, 1862. 

Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — transferred 
to Company A, 6th regiment. Vet. Reserve Corps- 
discharged by General Order, July 6, 1865. 

Transferred to Company F, 6th regiment. Vet. Res. 
Corps — discharged by General Order, July 10, 1865. 

Discharged by General Order, May 16, 1865. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Sept. i, 1863. 

Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Captured — died at Andersonville, Ga., July 22, 1864. 

Discharged January 23, 1863. 

Captured at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1S.64. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 11, 1863. 

Discharged February 18, 1863. 

Tr. to Company K, 6th reg. V. R. C, March 15, 1864— 
discharged July 3, 1865. 



8o 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Company I. 



Name. 



William Hasson 

Geo. R. Snowden. . . 
Cyrus H. Culver. . . . 

William H. Rhodes. 



Charles E. Huston. 
Oliver P. Young. . . 

Abram S. Prather.. 
Thomas Hogue. . . . 

Conrad Heasley . . . 
James K. Elliott . . . 
Loren M. Fulton . . 

Johnson W. Kerr . . 
Wilson Camp 

William Reynolds.. 



Jesse B. Moore 

George M. Wingar 



Charles Holbrook. 

Joshua Foster 

John A. Wilco.x. . . 
William Gorman. . 



David S. Keep. 



Artimus Holhs. . . 
Daniel Weaver. . 
John G. M'Lane . 

Best, George 

Bogue, Henry H. 



Brown, Samuel... . 
Bookster, Martm. . . . 
Bartlebaugh, Philip. 

Bower, William 

Burgwin, Wesley H 



Beatty, Eli 

Bower, James. 



Brown, Israel B . . . 

Craig, Robert 

Corbin, George W. 
Coldrew, David . . . 
Chesley, Frank W. 
Coburn, Joseph H . 
Colburn, Samuel J. 

Dempsey, Peter.. 
Davis, Richard . . . . 
Ducket, John 



Rank. 



Dilmore, Jacob 



Captain. 
....do ... 
....do ... 

ist Lieut. 



2d Lieut. 
ist Sergt 

....do ... 
Sergeant 

....do... 
...do... 
...do... 

....do... 
. . . . d(j . . . 



Corporal 
....do ... 



.do., 
.do .. 
.do .. 
.do .. 
do .. 



....do... 
....do .. 
Musician 
Private. . 
... do... 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 

.do 
.do 



.do 
.do 
do 
.do 
.do 
.do, 

.do, 
.do 
do , 



Mustered 
into Service 



Sept. 5, '64 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 



Aug. 30 



Sept. 
Aug. 30 

Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30, 

Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 
Sept. 5 



Aug. 30 

Aug. 30, 

Aug. 30 

Aug. 30. 

Aug. 30 

Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30, 
Sept. 5 
Sept. 5 

Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30, 

Aug. 30, '62, 



'62 



Remarks. 



Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — discharged 

by special order, October 5, 1863. 
Pr. from ist Sergt. to ist Lt. Sept. i, 1862 — to Captain, 

Nov. 16, 1863 — disch. by special order, Apr. 7, 1864. 
Pr. to Sgt. Sept. I, 1862— to ist Sgt. March 12, 1863— to 

ist Lieut. Jan. 15, 1864— to Captain, May i, 1864 — 

mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Pr. to Sgt. March 12, 1863 — to ist Sgt. June 6, 1S64 — to 

ist Lieut. July i, 1864 — mustered out with company. 

May 20, 1865. 
Wd. at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — dis. Sept. 14, '63. 
Pr. from Sgt. to ist Sgt. July 6, 1864 — com. 2d Lieut. — 

not mustered — mus. out with Co., May 29. 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 5, 1863. 
Pr. to Cor. Jan. 22, 1864 — to Sergt. July 7, 1864 — mus- 
tered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Promoted to Sergt. June 6, 1864— mustered out with 

company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged March 12, 1863. 
Pr. to Lieut. 8th reg. U. S. C. T., September 8, 1863— 

to Capt. Feb. 28, 1865— mustered out, Nov. 10, 1865. 
Died of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 

1863 — buried in Nat. Cera., section C, grave 36. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Promoted to Corporal, March 12, 1863 — wounded at 

Spottsylvania C. H., Va., May 9, 1864 — discharged 

by General Order, June 3, 1865. 
Promoted to Corporal, Oct. 26, 1863 — discharged by 

General Order, June 24, 1865. 
Promoted to Corporal, June 6, 1864 — mustered out 

with company. May 29, 1865. 
Promoted to Corporal, July 12, 1864 — mustered out 

with compaiiy. May 29, 1865. 
Promoted to Corporal, July 12, 1864 — mustered out 

with company, May 29, 1865. 
Discharged August 30, 1864, for wounds, with loss of 

leg, received in action. 
Killed at Spottsylvania C. H., Va., May 12, 1864. 
Killed at North Anna River, Va., May 23, 1864. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Captured at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863 — discharged 

by General Order, May 26, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged January 12, 1864, for wounds received at 

Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Discharged July 11, 1864. 
Died at Philadelphia, Pa., July 20, of wounds received 

at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Died May 7, of wounds received at Wilderness, Va., 

May 5, 1864. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. ■ 
Discharged by General Order, July 10, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Discharged March 15, 1863. 
Discharged April 14, 1863. 
Died of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 

1863 — buried in Nat. Cem., section E, grave 30. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Sept. 22, 1863. 
Killed at Spottsylvania C. H., Va., May 12, 1864 — 

buried in Burial Grounds Wilderness. 
Died at Windmill Point, Va., Feb. 5, 1863. 



ONE HUNDKED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



8l 



Name. 



Downinpr, Daniel . . . 

Earal, Eli 

Findley, William K.. 

Finch, Daniel H 

Gunderraan, Herm'n. 
Grossman, Simon.... 

Gibbons, Jolin 

Hatch, Philip M . ... 
Hill, James 



Rank. 



M'Calmont, H. R... 
M'Naughton, Dan'l. 



Nyman, John G. L. . 
Nicklin, Lambert F. 

Ray, Samuel 

Robinson, John 

Strohman, Henry... 

Shiffer, John 

Stiner, John 

Shaw, Hugh 

Shirley, Joseph B. . . 

Slamon, Owen 

Small, Joseph 

Sheriff, William J... 



Sharpnack, John W. 

Shaw, James W 

Shirley, Jacob A. . . . 
Siverline, Adam 



Shelmadine, W. W. . 



Turner, Augustus V. 

West, William 

Wesner, Marcus 

Walden, Jeremiah . . . 
Wadsworth, W. G ... 

Webber, George P. . . 



Wilco.x, Josiah. . 
Wesner, Wm. B. 
Yockey, Jacob. . 



Private . 

....do.. 
....do ... 
....do.. 
....do .. 
. .. do.. 
....do .. 
.. do.. 
....do ... 



Hogue, John W d 

Hogue, John P2 

James, David 

Jennings, Wise'n W. 

Kelly, Samuel 

Kennedy, Wilson . . . 
Keep, Charles E. . . . 

Little, Jacob F 

Laney, William 

Lamb, James F 

Lee, David 

Lockwood, Geo. R.. 

Mellin, Henry 

Moran, Patrick 

Mathews, Gam'l W. 
Morrison, Samuel... 
Manville, Adrian G. 

M'Cray, Boint 

M'Cray, Andrew 

M'Fate, Samuel 

MacLane, James E.. 



.do 
.do 

do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
.do 
-do 
.do 
.do 

do, 
.do. 
.do 
.do 

do 

do , 
.do. 



.do 
.do 
.do 
.do, 
.do. 
.do. 
do 
.do . 
.do 
.do , 
.do . 
.do . 

.do. 
do. 
.do. 
.do 



.do 
.do , 
.do 
.do 
.do 



do 
do, 
.do 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Aug. 


^o 


'62 


Sept. 


S 


'b2, 


Sept. 


s 


'b2. 


Aug. 


^o 


'62, 


Aug. 


^o 


'62, 


Aug. 


^o 


■62, 


Aug. 


T,0 


'62, 


Aug. 


^o 


■62, 


Aug. 


30 


'62, 


Aug. 


30 


•62, 


Mar. 


24 


'04, 


Aug. 


30 


'62, 


Aug. 


30 


'62, 


Sept. 


s 


'62, 


Aug. 


so 


'62, 


Aug. 


30 


'62, 


Sept. 


S 


'62, 


Aug. 


30 


'62, 


Aug. 


30 


'62, 


Aug. 


.SO 


'62, 


Aug. 


SO 


02, 


Aug. 


SO 


'62, 


Aug. 


SO 


'62, 


Aug. 




'62, 


Aug. 


SO 


'62, 


Aug. 


SO 


'62, 


Aug. 


SO 


'62, 


Aug. 


SO 


'62, 


Aug. 


SO 


■62, 


Aug. 


30 


'62, 


Aug. 


SO 


'62, 


Aug. 


30 


'62, 



Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Sept. 5, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Sept. 5, '62 
Aug. 30, 'q2 
Aug. 30, '62 
Sept. 5, '62 

Sept. 5, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Sept. 5, '62, 
Aug. 30, '62 

Sept. 5. '62 

Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 

Aug. 30, '62 

Aug. 30, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 
Sept, 5, '62 



Remarks. 



Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged March 2, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Oct. 20, 1863. 
Died of wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 

1863 — buried in Nat. Cem., section B, grave 27. 
Died February 24, 1863. 
Deserted July 30, 1864. 

Discharged by General Order, June 27, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 186c;. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Died near Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 10, 1862. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Absent, sick, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1S65. 
Died of wounds rec'd at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Wounded in action— disch. by G. O., June 17, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged Feb. 20, 1863. 
Transferred to V. S. Navy, April 19, 1864. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Tr. to i2ist Co., 2d batt., V'. R. C., March 2, 1864— dis- 
charged on Surgeon's certificate, March 20, 1865. 
Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps— date unknown. 
Died at Alexandria, June 4, of wounds received at 

Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 12, 1864 — 

grave 2023. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 16, 1863. 
Killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Deserted May 15, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 20, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged March 15, 1863. 
Discharged January 27, 1864, for wounds received at 

Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Discharged Marcl/'is, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Oct. 7, 1863. 
Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps — date unknown. 
Wounded and missing in action at Fredericksburg, 

Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Wounded and missing in action at Gettysburg, Pa., 

July I, 1863. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Absent, in hospital, at muster out. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Transferred to 55th company, 2d batt., V. R. C. — date 

unknown — disch. by G. O., Aug. 29, 1865. 
Captured at W^eldon R. R., Va., "August 21, 1864 — died 

at Salisbury, N. C, November 4, 1864. 
Deserted May 25, 1863. 

Captured—returned— deserted August, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 



82 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Com pan v K. 



Name. 



Charles H. Flagg. . . 
Joshua W. Howell.. 

Jeremiah Hoffman .. 

John W. Dissinger. . 
Cyrus K. Campbell . 



Samuel Decker 



Albert G. Ink... 
Wm. G. Garrett 



John P. Williams... . 

David R. Samuel 

Solomon W. Strohm. , 

George W. Brink , . . . 



Alpheus Cutler.. . 
Charles Steel... . 
John P. Griffiths. 



George Strickler. . . 

John T. Reed 

Martin L. Burtch. . 
James D. Giddings. 
John G. Silkworth . 
Edward Mehlman . 

Isaac Gisner 



do ... 

do ... 
.do . .. 
.do .. 

do ... 
.do .. 

.do... 

.do ... 

.do ... 

James V. Staley do... 

Lewis Wagner . . . . do . . . 

Thomas Prothero.... Musici'n 
Burkey, Charles K... Private . 

Bevan, Lewis | ... .do . . . 

Bickel, Abraham.. 

Bickle, Henry 

Cammer, Chester. 
Cooper, William . . 
Cool, John 



Wm. Fastnought.. 
Nathan Allen 



Captain. 
, .. do ... 



ist Lieut 



. ..do ... 
2d Lieut. 



ist Sgt.. 

. .do ... 
...do... 



Sergeant 
. . . do. . . 
. . . do . . . 



.do 



....do .. 
Corporal 
....do .. 



do . 
.do . 
.do 
.do 
.do . 

.do . 
do . 
.dc . 
.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
do 
.do . 
do. 
Dupple, Samuel i do , 

Evans, Watkin I do . 

Evans, Tenkin do, 

■ ^ .do 

.do 
.do . 



Conrad, John . . 
Davis, John R . 
Davis, Samuel . . 
Decker, Charles , 
Decker, Oliver.. 



Dunlap, John.. . . 
Davis, Youngs. . . 
Doolebohn, John 
Donley, James E. 



Fitzgerald, Edward. 
Garrett, Henry M... 
Garber, Peter 



Gisner, Jacob I do 



Mustered 
into Service. 



Sept. I, '62 
Aug. 30, '62 



Sept. 



Sept. 
Sept. 



Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 
Sept. 24 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Sept. I 

Aug. 30 



Aug. 30 
Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30 

Sept. I 
Sept. I 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Sept. I 

Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 

Sept. 25 

Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30, 
Sept. 25 
Aug. 30 
Sept. I 
Sept. I 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30, 
Aug. 30 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30, 
Sept. I 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 30, 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Sept. I 
Sept. 24 
Sept. 1 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Aug, 30 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Remarks. 



Aug. 30, '62, 



Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863. 

Promoted from Corporal to Captain, May i, 1864 — 
mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Com. Capt. July 4, 1863 — not mus. disch. Nov. 21, for 
wounds received at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Pr. fr. Sgt. Sept. 21, '64— mus. out with Co. May 2q, '65. 

Commissioned ist Lieut. July 4, 1863 — not mustered — 
discharged March g, 1863, for wounds received at 
Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Pr. to ist Sergt. Sept. i, 1864— com. 2d Lt.— not mus. — 
mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mis. in action at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Died Aug. 26, of wounds received at Petersburg, Va., 
June 18, 1864. 

Pr. to Sgt. Oct. I, 1864 — mus. out with Co., May 29, '65. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, July 15, 1863'. 

Discharged April 27, 1863, for wov'nds received at 
Fiedericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 

Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862 — 
transferred to Company D, iSth reg. V. R. C., Aug. 
15, 1863 — disch. by General Order, June 29, 1865. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Nov. 16, 1863. 

Pr. to Cor. Mar. i, '63 — mus. out with Co., May 29, '65. 

Promoted to Corporal, April, 1863 — captured at Wil- 
derness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

Pr. to Cor. Feb. 3, '65 — mus. out with Co., May 29, '65. 

Pr. to Cor. Mar. i, '65— mus. out with Co., May 29, '65. 

Discharged '-n Surgeon's certificate. Mar. i, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 16, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 19, 1863. 

Wd. at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863— tr. to V. R. C, 
Mar. 1865 — disch. by Gen. Order, June 26, 1865. 

Wd. at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863— tr. to V. R. C— 
date unknown — disch. by G. O., June 26, 1865. 

Died £t Frederick, Md., Nov. 16, '62 — burial record, 
Oct. 28, 1862— buried at Mt. Olivet Cemetery. 

Pr. to Cor. Aug. 18, 1864— died Feb. 7, at City Point, 
Va., of wounds rec'd at Dabney's Mill, Feb. 6, 1865. 

Promoted to Corporal, May n, 1863 — died at Peters- 
burg. Va., Nov. 30, 1864. 

Deserted September, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company, Maj- 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Oct., 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Dec. 14, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, April 9, 1864. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 16, 1863. 

Tr. to Co. G, i2th reg. V. R. C, Feb. 11, 1864— dis- 
charged by General Order, June 29, 1865. 

Mis. in action at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged February zo, 1863, for wounds received at 
Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb., 1863. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps — date unknown. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps — date unknown. 

Transferred to Signal Corps — date unknown. 

Died July 24, of wds. received at Spottsylvania C. H., 
Va., May 12, 1864 — buried in Nat. Cem., Arlington. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 15, 1864. 

Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 

Discharged March 24, for wounds received at Freder- 
icksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Jan. 13, 1864. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Name. 



Griest, George 

Gruver, Thomas. . . . 
Hale, Denzimore N. 
Hampton, William. . 



Heisey, David 
House, John . . 



Holvey, John 

Hass, Merritt 

Jones, Wm. D 

Johnson, William . 
Jones, Meredith . . , 
Kendall, Wm. H. . 
Laird, William. .'. . 



Lutringer, Benj 

Miller, I.ewi^ 

Meredith, Thomas. 



Morgan, John.. . . 
Morris, Reuben . 

M'Lean, John 

M'Camley, Zuray 
M'Nellis, Barney. 

Nagle, John S 

Peters, William. . 
Phillipi, William. 
Smith, Samuel . . . 
Steinmetz, Gcorg( 
Seiders, Michael . 



Souders, Jacob. 
Seagrist, Jonas. 



Seiders, William H 

Shortz, Lewis 

Scott, George C 



Seiders, John. 



Smith, Henry. . . 
Smith, Peter .. . . 
Smith, Nicholas. 



Sheets, Levi 

Tompkins, Caleb. . . 



Vanbuskirk, Wm . . 

Waters, Richard S. 

Weiscarrier, And . . 
Wilson, Alex'r C. . 



R.\NK. 



Private. 

.. .do .. 

...do.. 

. . . do . . 



Mustered 
into Service. 



.do 
.do 



...do. 
. ..do . 
...do , 
...do, 
...do, 
...do, 
...do 



.do 
.do 
.do 



...do . 
...do . 
... do , 
...do. 
...do , 
... do . 
...do , 
...do, 
...do 
...do 
...do 



.do , 
.do. 



.do.. 



.do, 
.do 



.do 
.do 
.do 

do 
.do 

.do 

.do 



...do 
..do 



Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Aug. 


so. 


'62, 


Aug. 


so, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30. 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


.30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I. 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Feb. 


3, 


'6s, 


Sept. 


I. 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


•62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Sept. 


2, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


'62, 


Aug. 


.30, 


'62, 


Sept. 


I, 


"62, 


Sept. 


1, 


'62, 


Aug. 


30, 


•62, 


Aug. 


30, 


'62, 


Aug. 
Sept 


30- 
I, 


'62, 
'62, 



Remarks. 



Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, Feb. 3, 1863. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, May 15, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29. 1865. 
Captured at Petersburg, Va., Jan. 24, 1865 — disch. by 

General Order, May 26, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Wounded at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862 — 

absent, in hospital, at muster out. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate — date unknown. 
Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps, Jan. 1, 1865. 
Discharged by special order, Nov. 15, 1864. 
Deserted December 3, 1862. 
Deserted July i, 1863. 

Mis. in action at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Wounded and captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 

13, 1862— died at Richmond, Jan. 3, 1863. 
Wounded and captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 

13, 1862 — died at Richmond, Jan. 14, 1863. 
Wounded at Dabney's Mills, Va., February 6, 1865 — 

discharged by General Order, June 7, 1865. 
Discharged March 4, 1863, for wounds received at 

Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Discharged January 23, 1863. 
Discharged January 13, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. Mar. 24, 1863. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 
Deserted — date unknown. 
Transferred to 190th reg. P. V., May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Missing in action at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Mustered out with company, May 29, 1865. 
Mustered out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Prisoner from May 5, 1864, to May 14, 1865— mustered 

out with company. May 29, 1865. 
Discharged by special order, Sept. 15, 1864. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863— transferred 

to Veteran Reserve Corps, January i, 1865. 
Transferred to Co. A, 6th reg. Vet. Reserve Corps, 

Jan. 15, 1864 — disch. by General Order, July 6, 1865. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Feb. 15, 1864. 
Wounded and captured at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 

13, 1862 — died at Annapolis, Md., Feb. 22, 1863. 
Cajjtured — died at Andersonville, Ga., July 19, 1864 — 

grave 3632. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862— burial 

record, died at Richmond, December 31, 1862. 
Deserted January i, 1863. 
Died at Washington, D. C, Feb. 7, 1863— buried in 

Millitary Asylum Cemetery. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863— buried in 

National Cemetery, section B, grave 35. 
Disch. on Surg, cert., Jan. 19, 1863 — re-enlisted March 

30, 1864— tr.'to 190th reg. P. V., May 29, 1865— Vet. 
Killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 
Deserted — date unknown. , 



APPENDIX. 



DESCRIPTION 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG 



'T^HIS description of the Battle of Gettysburg, and of 
-'■ General Lee's retreat from there, headed " The Valley 
of the Shadow of Death," I have taken from a small pamphlet 
which I purchased on the battle-field several years ago. I 
think it the most perfect description— as it actually occurred — 
1 have ever read, and I am quite sure my comratles and friends 
will agree u ilh me after they have perused it. 

THE FIRST DAY. 

July i, 1863. 

Su.M.MAKY OF POINTS. — First. The battle begins on Seminary Ridge, about 9 
A. M., with an engagement between Heth and Buford. Second. Engagement be- 
tween the divisions of Heth and Pender of the Confederate Army and the First 
Corps of the Federal Army. Third. Death of General Reynolds. Fourth. En- 
gagement between the divisions of Heth, Pender, Rodes and Early of the Con- 
federate Army, and the First and Eleventh Corps of the Federal Army. Fifth. 
Repulse of the Federals, abandonment of Seminary Ridge, and occupation of 
Cemetery Hill ; occupation of Gettysburg town by the Confederates. Si.rth. 
Duration of the active fighting, a little less than seven hours. 

A few minutes l)efore nine o'clock on July ist, Eieutenant-Colonel 
Kress, of General Wadsworth's staff, rode slowly into Gettysburg, 
ambling along on his chestnut charger, in no haste to accomplish 
his business, and avoiding the now active sun wherever the trees 
afforded a friendly shelter. Directing his horse to the nearest tav- 
ern, he found General Buford in front of the door, surrounded by 
his staff. The gallant cavalry general turned to him and said : 
" What are you doing here, sir ? " Kress replied that he came to 



88 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

get some shoes for Wadsworth's division. Buford told him he had 
better return at once to his command. Kress said: " Why, what 
is the matter, general ? " At that moment the far-off sound of a 
single gun — dull, prolonged, ominous — floated to them on the wings 
of the western breeze. Buford hastily mounted his horse, and, as 
he galloped off, answered the question of Kress: '' Thaf s the mat- 
ter ! " A few seconds later three cannon-shots were heard. Buford 
signals for his skirmishers to fire. They deliver a volley, and the 
battle of Gettysburg has begun. 

Having satisfied himself the night before that he was about to be 
attacked, Buford was early in the saddle on this fateful day, placmg 
the finishing touches upon his preparations to meet the foe. He 
had arranged his small force quite imposingly. Indeed, had he had 
at his command the half-million of troops that a farmer's wife, in re- 
ply to a Confederate officer's inquiry, declared were in Gettysburg, 
he could hardly have made a better showing. It was not only im- 
posing, but it was far better — it was effective ; for, when the Con- 
federates attacked, "booming skirmishers, three deep," as Buf6rd 
had predicted the night before, they met a stubborn and admirably- 
directed resistance. 

His skirmish-line extended from the point where the Millerstown 
road crosses Willoughby Run, following the somewhat tortuous 
bluff bordering the left bank of that stream across the Chambers- 
burg way, and thence around, crossing the Mummasburg, Carlisle, 
and Harrisburg pikes, and the railroad. On a ridge running parallel 
with Seminary Ridge, and half a mile from it, was posted the bal- 
ance of his forces, dismounted. Covering the roads on which the 
enemy was first expected to advance, were planted the guns of his 
light batteries. It was with this disposition of his forces that tlie 
fight was opened. 

Buford's men for the most part fought dismounted. This caused 
the Confederates to suppose them to be infantry, and, in conse- 
quence, Heth's division of Ewell's Corps, which precipitated the 
attack in an attempt to seize Gettysburg, moved tardily. A con- 
stantly increasing skirmish-fire was maintained for half an hour, 
when the artillery arrived to support Heth's men, and it at once 
opened with spirit. The guns of Buford made a prompt response, 
and were served with so much skill as to completely preserve the 
delusion that he was well supported. The fury of the fight in- 
creased every moment, and the gallant Buford was soon aware that 
the weight of numbers would shortly force him to fall back to Cem- 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 89 

etery Hill, for which he had prepared. But not an inch did he 
yield ; hope told the flattering tale that reinforcements would soon 
be up. In his direst extremity, when every minute, every second 
counted, just as his heart sank the lowest. General Reynolds 
arrived, about a mile in advance of his corps. As soon as he had 
reconnoitred the field, he requested Buford to hold fast to his posi- 
tion, and said he would bring up the whole right wing of the army. 
He immediately sent dispatches in accord with this determination, 
and started to rejoin his now advancing men. 

Cutler's brigade, of Wadsworth's division, led the advance of the 
supporting column. Three regiments of this brigade, the 76th and 
147th New York, and the 56th Pennsylvania, went, under Wads- 
worth, to the right of the line, facing westward, north of the bed of 
the old unfinished railroad. The two remaining regiments, the 95th 
New York and the 14th Brooklyn, with Hall's Maine battery, Rey- 
nolds took to the south of the railroad grading, and placed them on 
a line with, but a little in advance of, the other regiments, the bat- 
tery occupying the pike. As the infantry moved up, the cavalry 
retired. The regiments to the right of the cut had hardly reached 
their positions before they were heavily engaged. The force of 
men employed in exerting this pressure was the newly-placed regi- 
ments. They overlooked the west bank of Willoughby Run. Their 
artillery occupied the commanding points of the bluff. 

While the attack on Cutler's brigade was in fierce progress, and 
the roar and rattle of musketry and cannon rose and fell like the 
irregular thunder of waves in a storm. General Doubleday arrived 
on the ground with the two remaining divisions of the First Corps. 
General Reynolds directed him to hold on to the road leadmg to 
Fairfield or Hagerstown, while he (General Reynolds) would main- 
tain the possession of the Chambersburg pike. 

There was a piece of woods between the two roads, triangular in 
shape, the base resting on Willoughby Run and the apex reaching 
up to Seminary Ridge, which seemed to Doubleday the key to the 
position. He made immediate arrangements to secure it, and not a 
moment too soon, as the enemy, appreciating the advantages of the 
spot, were already moving across Willoughby Run to attempt its 
possession. As the men filed past, Doubleday urged them to hold 
the woods at all hazards. Full of fight and enthusiasm, they replied 
to their commander : " If we can't hold it, where will you find the 
men who can ? " The answer was justified, for it was given by the 
men of the Iron Brigade, and they were commanded by Colonel 



90 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

Morrow, of the 24th Michigan Volunteers. As the Iron Brigade 
went in on one side, Archer's brigade, preceded by a skirmish-line, 
went in on the other. Hardly had the two brigades locked horns 
in a discjjarge of their muskets, before the charge, led by the 2d 
Wisconsin, under Colonel Fairchild, swept suddenly and unexpect- 
edly round the right flank of Archer's brigade, and captured a thou- 
sand prisoners, including Archer himself. The surprise of Archer's 
m.en was complete, for they supposed they were contending with 
militiamen hastily organized in the fright of the North at the actu- 
alities of mvasion. When the Iron Brigade appeared, however, and 
Archer's men recognized their old antagonists, with the peculiar 
hats, a cry went up : " There are those damned black-hatted fellows 
again ! 'Tain't no militia. It's the Army of the Potomac." 

Just as the Iron Brigade charged so gallantly, occurred one of 
the saddest incidents of that sad field — the death of General Rey- 
nolds. This great and gallant soldier was on his horse, at the edge 
of the woods, surrounded by his staff. Naturally anxious as to the 
result, he turned his head frequently to see if the troops were 
coming. While looking back in this way, one of the enemy's sharp- 
shooters shot him in the head, the bullet entering the back of the 
head and coming out near the eye. He fell dead instantly and 
never spoke a word. It was a few minutes before 11 a. m. In 
the choice vigor of his full manhood, in the fullness of a well- 
earned military fame, perished this hero upon a field which his 
genius had fixed for the determination of one of the great and 
decisive conflicts of the world. Yet, as . General Meade said, 
" where could man meet better the inevitable hour than in defense 
of his native State, his life-blood mingling with the soil on which 
he first drew breath ? " 

The death of Reynolds threw the command and the responsi- 
bility upon Doubleday. His first duty was to repair the damage 
inflicted on the right of his line, where Cutler's brigade had been 
driven back toward the town. The reserve, under Lieutenant- 
Colonel Dawes, with the assistance of Fowler's two regiments, ac- 
complished the check of the enemy, drove a number of the enemy 
into the railroad cut, where they surrendered. This successful 
assault, while relieving Cutler's brigade from pursuit, also released 
the 147th New York, which, by the inroad of the Confederates, had 
been surrounded. It also enabled Doubleday's men to regain the 
gun lost by Hall's battery, and to reform the line where General 
Reynolds had placed it. The two regiments of Cutler's brigade 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 9 1 

were brought back from the town, and resumed the fighting with 
great gallantry. 

There was now a lull in the combat. Heth was reorganizing his 
shattered front line, and Doubleday was waiting the arrival of more 
troops, pending the renewed onslaught. The Federals did not have 
long to wait. Pender's division, which had not yet been engaged, 
was now deployed, during which mananivre the two remaining divi- 
sions of the First Corps, Rowley's and Robinson's, arrived on the 
field. The engagement was promptlv renewed, and soon the cour- 
age and fighting character of the Bucktail brigade was offered the 
gage of proof. It was commanded by Colonel Stone, and fought 
with conspicuous bravery. 

He was hardly in position before a new danger threatened. 
Ewell, with Stonewall Jackson's veterans, arrived. Deploying their 
skirmishers first on the Hunterstown road, they gradually pushed 
into every nook and corner where they could come unobserved on 
the Union line. Devin's brigade of cavalry faced them with deter- 
mined signal courage. Never was a line of cavalry put to a severer 
strain. The ground whereon it stood was open, with no advantage- 
ous positions from which to fight. But taking advantage of every 
particle of fence', timber, or rise in front, the handful of Devin's 
men managed, with singular pluck, to temporarily arrest the progress 
of the veterans in gray. 

General Howard arrived in advance of his corps, about i p. m., 
and, ranking General Doubleday, he assumed command. The lat- 
ter took command of the First Corps, that of the Eleventh being 
turned over to Carl Schurz, who now had three divisions under him, 
commanded by Generals Von Steinwehr, Barlow, and Schimmel- 
pfennig. Von Steinwehr promptly occupied Cemetery Hill with his 
division and the artillery, in accordance with an order of Reynolds. 
Barlow and Schimmelpfennig brought their men forward and re- 
lieved the gallant but sore-pressed men of Devin's brigade, who so 
valiantly were obstructing Ewell's march. Barlow extended his 
men round to the right as far as Rock Creek. Schimmelpfennig 
posted his to the left until they almost touched the right of the First 
Corps on Seminary Ridge. 

The divisions of Pender and Heth were by this time developed 
to their full strength, and they faced the First Corps with nearly 
three times as many men as the Federals offered in opposition. 
Pender's left was extended so as to almost join Rode's division of 
Ewell's men. Some advantages of position compelled the Federals 



92 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

now to slightly alter their line of battle, but substantially they were 
defending an inner circle while the Confederates fought on an 
outer. 

The fighting was most obstinate when it began, under these new 
arrangements, in a general advance of the Confederate infantry at 
1.30 p. M. Opposed to the two corps of Federal troops — the First 
and Eleventh — were the divisions of Heth, Pender, Rodes, and 
Early, a full half of the Confederate army, with the remainder in 
supporting distance, or, in figures, 10,000 men opposed to 40,000. 
No wonder the fighting, if there was any, was obstinate ; it had to 
be. For about two miles the Confederate formation was that of a 
" nearly continuous double line of deployed battalions, with other 
battalions in reserve." As it advanced it could not conform to the 
irregularity of the Union line, and in consequence the Confederate 
left became first engaged, striking the northern extrem'ty or right 
of the First Corps line. As there was a gap between the First and 
Eleventh Corps, Doubleday ordered Robinson, with all the reserve, 
Paul's and Baxter's brigades, assisted by Stewart's battery, of the 
4th United States Artillery, to the weak spot, where, by desperate 
struggles, he was enabled to prevent the enemy from marching in. 

By this time the battle was well under way. It was fierce, san- 
guinary, and determined. The Confederates fought with deter- 
mined valor, and were resisted with more determination. Repeat- 
edly the onslaughts against the old line — Stone, Wadsworth — and 
against Paul and Baxter were renewed, and as repeatedly thwarted. 
More daring leaders than the commanders of these brigades could 
not be found. Their men were of the same spirit, and, though suf- 
fering at every attack, thev yet hurled back the foe aiul maintained 
their ground. The gallant Paul, in one of these, was paid for his 
bravery by a cruel wound, losing both his eyes. 

While the chief force of the attack fell upon Robinson and Wads- 
worth, Stone was able to effectually supplement their operations ; 
but when the enemy, unable to make an impression, turned upon 
Stone, Robinson and Wadsworth were too far away to return the com- 
pliment, and the blow fell with withering effect. In two lines, formed 
parallel to the pike, and at right angles to Wadsworth, the enemy 
first advanced upon Stone, who, anticipating such a movement, had 
thrown one of his regiments, under Colonel Dwight, forward to the 
railroad cut, where the men awaited the approach. When arrived 
at a fence, within pistol-shot, Dwight delivered a withering fire. 
Nothing daunted, the hostile lines crossed the fence, and continued 



BATTT.E OF GETTYSBURG. 93 

to move forward. 15y this time Dwight's men liad reloaded, and, 
when the advancing foe had arrived close upon the bank, they de- 
livered another telling volley. They then leaped the bank and 
vaulted forward with the bayonet, uttering wild shouts, before which 
the foe fled in dismay. On returning, Dwight found that the enemy 
had planted a battery away to the west, so as to completely enfilade 
the railroad cut, making it untenable ; whereupon he returned to 
his original position 'on the pike. 

At this juncture Colonel Stone fell, severely wounded, and was 
borne off, the comniand devolving upon Colonel Wister. Foiled in 
their first attempt, with fresh troops the Confederate leaders came 
on from the northwest, that if possible the weak spot in the Bucktail 
line might be found. But Wister, disposing the regiment which in 
part faced the north to meet them, checked and drove them back 
from this point also. Again, with an enthusiasm never bated, they 
advanced from the north, and now crossing the railroad cut, which 
their guns guarded, rushed forward ; but a resolute bayonet-charge 
sent them back again, and that front was once more clear. Believ- 
ing that a single thin line, unsupported, unrenewed, and unprotected 
by breastworks, must eventually yield, a determined attack ■ was 
again made from the west, but with no better results than before, 
being met by Colonel Huidekoper, who had succeeded to the com- 
mand of Wister's regiment, and, though receiving a grievous wound, 
from the effect of which he lost his right arm, he held his ground, 
and the enemy retired once more in dismay. 

The wave of battle as it rolled southward, reached every part in 
turn, and the extreme Union left, where Colonel Chapman Biddle's 
brigade was posted, at length felt its power. A body of troops, ap- 
parently an entire division, drawn out in heavy line.s, came down 
from the west and south, and, overlapping both of Biddle's flanks, 
moved defiantly on. Only three small regiments were in position 
to receive them ; but, ordering up the 151st Pennsylvania, and 
throwing it into the gap between Meredith's and his own, and 
wheeling the battery into position, Biddle awaited the approach. 
As the enemy appeared beyond the wood, under cover of which 
they had formed, a torrent of death-dealing missiles leaped from the 
guns. Terrible rents were made ; but, closing up, they came on 
undaunted. Never were guns better served ; and, though the 
ground was strewn with the slain, their line seemed instantly to 
grow together, as a stone thrown into the waves disappears and the 
waves floAV together again. The infantry fire was terrific on both 



94 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

sides ; but the enemy, outflanking Biddle, sent a direct and doubl}- 
destructive oblique fire, before which it seemed impossible to stand. 
But, though the dead fell until the living could fight from behind 
them as from a bulwark, the living stood fast, as if rooted to the 
ground. 

While the battle was raging with such fur}' on the First Corps 
front, it was warmly maintained on the right, where two divisions 
of the Eleventh Corps had been posted. When General Howard 
first arrived on the field, and became aware that the enemy was ad- 
vancing in great force from the north, he saw at a glance that Sem- 
inary Ridge would not for a moment be tenable unless the descent 
from this direction could be checked. Ewell, who was upon that 
front, seemed indisposed to make a determined assault until the 
bulk of his corps was up, and he could act in conjunction with the 
forces of Hill, advancing from the west. He accordingly pushed 
Rodes, with the advance division, over upon the right, until it 
formed a junction with Hill. He likewise sent the division of 
Early upon the left until he flanked the position which the cavalry 
of Buford was holding. 

While Ewell was waiting, there was one labor being executed 
which proved of vital importance in the final cast of the battle : it 
was the fortifying of Cemetery Hill by Von Steinwehr. Around 
the base of this hill were low stone walls, tier above tier, extending 
from the Taneytovvn road around to the westerly extremity of 
Wolf's Hill. These afforded excellent protection to infantry, and 
behind them the soldiers, weary with the long march and covered 
with dust, threw themselves for rest. Upon the summit were 
beautiful green fields, now covered by second growth, which to the 
tread had the seeming of a carpet of velvet. 

Von Steinwehr was an accomplished soldier, having been thor- 
oughly schooled in the practice of the Prussian army. His military 
eye was delighted with this position, and thither he drew his heavy 
pieces, and planted them on the very summit, at the uttermost verge 
towards the town. But the position, though bold and commanding, 
was itself commanded, and Steinwehr instantly realized that there 
would be blows to take as well as to give. No tree, no house, no 
obstruction of any kind, shielded it from the innumerable points on 
the opposite hills, from Benner's, on the extreme right, beyond 
Wolf's Hill, around far south on Seminary Ridge to the left ; but it 
stood out in bold relief, the guns presenting excellent targets for the 
enemy's missiles the moment he should come within artillery-range. 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 95 

However powerful and effective his own guns might prove while 
unassailed, Steinwehr saw that they would be unable to live long 
when attacked, unless protected. Nor would any light works be of 
avail. There was no time to build a fort, for which the ground was 
admirably adapted. He accordingly threw up lunettes around each 
gun. These were not mere heaps of stubble and turf, but solid 
works of such height and thickness as to defy the most powerful 
bolts which the enemy could throw against them, with smooth and 
perfectly level platforms on which the guns could be worked. If 
the First and Eleventh Corps performed no other service in hold- 
ing on to their positions, though sustaining fearful losses, the giving 
opportunity for the construction of these lunettes and getting a firm 
foothold upon this great vantage-ground, was ample compensation 
for every hardship and misfortune, and the labor and skill of Stein- 
wehr in constructing them must ever remain a subject of admiration. 

When Barlow, who commanded the division of the Eleventh 
Corps which took the right of line in front of the town, was going 
into position, he discovered a wooded eminence a little to the north 
of the point where the Harrisburg road crosses Rock Creek, and 
here he determined to made his right rest. It was the ground 
which the skirmish-line of Devin had held. But, as the cavalry re- 
tired, the enemy had immediately thrown forward a body of skir- 
mishers to occupy it. To dislodge these, Barlow sent forward Von 
Gilsa's brigade. At the Almshouse the line halted, and knapsacks 
were thrown aside. It was then ordered to advance at double- 
quick. The order was gallantly executed, and the wood quickly 
cleared. Dispositions were made to hold it, and Wilkeson's battery, 
of the 4th United States, was advanced to its aid. The watchful 
Von Gilsa, however, soon discovered that the enemy was massed 
upon his flank, the brigades of Gordon and Hays, of Early's divi- 
sion, being formed under cover of the wooded ground on either 
side of Rock Creek, and ready to advance upon him. He found it 
impossible to hold this advanced position, and was obliged to 
allow that wing to fall back to the neighborhood of the Almshouse. 

On the left, in the direction of the First Corps right, the brigade of 
Colonel Von Arnsburg was placed, with Dilger's and Wheeler's bat- 
teries. The extreme left was occupied by the 74th Pennsylvania. 
This regiment was much reduced in numbers, and in attempting to 
cover a long space it could present little more than a skirmish-line, 
which rested at a fence by a cross-road connecting the Carlisle and 
the Mummasburg ways. The Eleventh Corps line had hardly been 



g6 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

established before the enemy, whose dispositions had been mainly 
perfected previous to its arrival, came down upon it with overwhelm- 
mg might. 

On the southern slope of Seminary Ridge, on a prolongation of 
the First Corps line northward, was a commanding position which- 
the enemy could not be prevented from occupying, and where he 
now planted his artillery so as to send an oblique and very destruc- 
tive lire upon the left of the Eleventh Corps. From this point also, 
having massed his infantry, he came on, sweepmg past the right of 
the First Corps, and breaking and crumpling the left of the Eleventh. 
The right of the First, being thus turned, was obliged to retire, and 
was carried back. At this juncture Early, who was already massed 
on the extreme right flank of the Eleventh, also advanced. Near 
the Almshouse he met a stubborn resistance, and in the midst of 
the fight the gallant Barlow was wounded, and fell helpless into the 
enemy's hands. Stands were made at intervals, and the enemy held 
in check ; but it was impossible to stay the onset. Until the town 
was reached, the retirement was comparatively deliberate and or- 
derly ; but when arrived there, being huddled in the narrow streets, 
subjected to a rapid fire from the batteries which raked them, and 
the enemy's swarming infantry intent on their destruction or cap- 
ture, the men fell into confusion. Their olificers strove to save 
them by ordering them into the cross-alleys. But this only added 
to the confusion, the men either not understanding the commands 
or hoping to escape the fire of the foe, and over twelve hundred 
were made prisoners in less than twenty minutes. 

While this was passing upon the right, the enemy assaulted upon 
the left with no less vigor, but not with the same success. Though 
the First Corps had now been five hours in the fight, some portions 
of it six, and without supports or reliefs, it still stood fast, deter- 
mined to make good the cry which they at the first had raised : 
" We have come to stay." But when it was known that the right of 
the corps had been turned, and that the Eleventh Corps was falling 
back, it became evident that the position which had been so long 
and so gallantly held, and withal with such substantial fruits, would 
have to be given up. Baxter's brigade, which had fought with stub- 
born bravery upon the right, was brought to the rear of the ridge at 
the railroad cut, where it defended a battery, and still held the enemy 
advancing from the north in check. Paul's brigade, having lost its 
commander, in retiring became entangled, and a considerable num- 
ber fell into the enemy's hands. On the left, Meredith's and Bid- 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 97 

die's brigades were ordered to fall back and cover the retirement of 
the balance of the line. Wister, who had succeeded to the command 
of Stone's brigade upon the fall of the latter, had likewise received 
a severe wound, and had turned over the brigade to Colonel Dana. 
At a barricade of rails which had been thrown up early in the day 
by Robinson's men, a final stand was made, and here the chief of 
artillery, Colonel Wainright, had posted his batteries, those of 
Cooper, Breck, Stevens, and Wilber, thus concentrating twelve guns 
in so small a space that they were scarcely five yards apart. Cap- 
tain Stewart's battery was also in position on the summit, two pieces 
on either side of the railroad cut. 

Encouraged by this falling back, the enemy was brought up ni 
masses, as to an easy victory, and, forming in two lines, swept for- 
ward. As they approached, the artillery opened ujion them, Stew- 
art's guns being so far to right and front that he could enfilade their 
lines. Their front line was, by Ihis concentrated fire, much broken 
and dispirited, but the second, which was also supported, pressed 
on. When arrived within musket-range their advance was checked, 
and the firmg for a short time was hot. The rebels, who greatly 
outnumbered the small Union line, now began to show themselves 
upon the left flank. Seeing that the position could not much longer 
be held, Doubleday ordered the artillery to retire, and it moved in 
good order from the field, wending its way back to Cemetery Hill. 
But, before the pieces were all away, the enemy had gained so far 
upon the flank as to reach it with his musketry-fire, shielding himself 
behind a garden-fence which runs within fifty yards of the pike. He- 
fore the last piece had passed, the fire had become very warm, and 
the horses attached to this gun were shot. The piece, consequently, 
had to be abandoned, together with three caissons. 

The infantry held its position behind the barricade, successfully 
checking the enemy in front, the men showing the most unflinching 
determination, Captain Richardson, of General Meredith's staff, 
riding up and down the line waving a regimental flag, and encour- 
aging them to duty. But the enemy was now swarming upon the 
very summit of the ridge, upon the left flank of Doubleday. So 
near had they approached, that Lieutenant-C'olonel McFarland, 
while reconnoitring to discover their exact position, received a vol- 
ley which shattered both legs. " When all the troops at this point," 
says General Doubleday, '' were overpowered. Captain Glenn, of 
the 149th Pennsylvania, in command of the Headquarter Guard, 
defended the building [Seminary] for full twenty minutes against a 



98 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

whole brigade of the enemy, enabling the few remaining troops, the 
ambulances, and artillery, to retreat in comparative safety." 

And now was seen the great advantage in the position of Stein- 
wehr's reserves. As the begrimed cannoneers, and the beasts foam- 
ing with the excitement of battle, and the sadly-thinned ranks of 
mfantry, exhausted by six hours of continuous fighting, filed through 
the town and approached Cemetery Hill, they came as to the folds 
of an impregnable fortress. Here at length was rest and security. 
Whenever the foeman attempted to follow, they came immediately 
into range of Steinwehr's well-posted guns, and at every stone wall 
and building was an abattis of bayonets. The heroic Buford, who 
had first felt the shock of battle, and during the long hours of this 
terrible day had held his troops upon the flanks of the infantrj?^, 
joining in the fierce fighting as opportunity or necessity required, 
and who from his watch-tower had scanned and reported every 
phase of the battle, was now at the critical moment a pillar of 
strength. The insignificant division of Steinwehr would alone have 
presented but a narrow barrier to a powerful and triumphant foe, 
intent on pushing his advantage, and to the left, where country is 
all open, and nature presents no impediment to an advance, it could 
have been flanked and easily turned out of its position. But here, 
like a wall of adamant, stood the veterans of Buford, with guns 
skillfully posted, ready to dispute the progress of the enemy. His 
front was tried, and the attempt was made to push past him along 
the low ground drained by Stevens Run, where some severe fighting 
occurred. But he maintained his ground intact, and that admira- 
ble position was again saved. 

On the right of Steinwehr's position were the rugged heights of 
Wolf's Hill, a natural buttress, unassailable in front from its abrupt- 
ness, and, though susceptible of being turned, as it was on the fol- 
lowing evening, yet so curtained by an impenetrable wood as to 
convey the suspicion of danger lurking therein. Early, who was in 
front of this hill, made some attempts to carry it, but, finding it ap- 
parently well protected, did not push his reconnoisance. 

As the two broken corps of the Union army ascended Cemetery 
Hill, they were met by staff officers, who turned the Eleventh 
Corps to the right and the First Corps to the left, where they went 
into position along the summit of the ridge stretching out on either 
hand from the Baltimore pike. A ravine to the right of Cemetery 
Hill, and between that and Wolf's Hill, seemed to present to the 
enemy a favorable point of attack, and hither was at once sent 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 99 

Stevens's Maine battery and Wadsworth's division of the First Corps. 
Here Wadsworth immediately commenced substantial breastworks 
along the brow of the hill, an example which other troops followed, 
until the whole front, e.xtending to Spangler's Spring, was sur- 
mounted by one of like strength. Through that ravine the enemy 
did assail, but the preparations to meet him were too thorough to 
admit of his entrance. 

This ended the first day of the great conflict. The combatants 
drew breath, and under cover of the now rapidly falling night, 
rested : the soldiers upon the earth anywhere, the officers in earnest 
thought for the morrow, when again would be upreared the purple 
banners of horrid war. 

The results of the first day may be thus summed up : In the 
face of the most disastrous odds, the Federal troops that were en- 
gaged held the ground on which the battle opened, and finally sur- 
rendered it only in the face of the whole Confederate army ; the 
Union army ended the day much dispirited, driven from their posi- 
tion, and disorganized by a panic to which was added the disheart- 
ening influence of the death of Reynolds, undoubtedly the most 
remarkable ma,n among all the officers that the Army of the Poto- 
mac saw fall in battle during the four years of its existence ; the 
Confederates were in high spirits over the substantial advantages 
they had gained, and went into bivouac with eager desire for day- 
light and the renewal of the contest. 



THE SECOND DAY. 

July 2, 1863. 

Summary of Points. — Federal positions arranged and occupied. Skirmish- 
ing by various small commands. Battle begun at 3.30 p. m. Attack on Federal 
left, commanded by Sickles, by First Confederate Corps, commanded by Long- 
street. The severe engagements of the Peach Orchard. Devil's Den, and Wheat 
Field. Vincent's occupation and defense of Little Round Top. Final Repulse 
of Longstreet's assaults, and cessation of fighting on Federal left, 8 p. m. Ewell's 
attack on Gulp's Hill begins at 5 p. m. Johnson on extreme Federal left. Early 
on Cemetery Hill. Charge of the Louisiana Tigers. Repulse of Confederates, 
and cessation of fighting on Federal right, 9 p. m. Duration of battle, four hours 
and a half on Federal left, four hours on Federal right. 

Everyone felt that the dawn of the second of July would herald 
the critical hour of the conflict. The hot breathless night that was 



874442A 



100 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

hastening to a close when Meade arrived on the field seemed to 
augur the approach of death, and presage the inevitable slaughter 
of the day now breaking. What thoughts must have been his ! 
Holding supreme command less than a week, and already engaged- 
in a battle in which was enveloped the fate of the Republic ! 

When he reached the battle-field, at i a. m. of this day, he found 
the Eleventh Corps occupying Cemetery Hill, along which had 
rallied Schurz's division across the Baltimore road ; Steinwehr's on 
the left, and on the right and rear Barlow's men, now commanded 
by Ames. The First Corps was divided : Wadsworth, on the right 
of Ames, held Culp's Hill ; Robinson, on the left of Steinwehr and 
across the Taneytown road, extended as far as a clump of trees 
' called Ziegler's Grove ; Doubleday, who had transferred the com- 
mand of the corps to General Newton, was in reserve with his 
division in the rear of Schurz. The combined artillery of these two 
corps covered their front, sheltered to a great extent by the light 
earth-works constructed on Cemetery Hill the previous day. South 
of Ziegler's Grove, Hancock had, since the evening of the ist, pro- 
longed the Federal left, with the troops he had at his disposal, as 
far as the Round Tops, so as to present a solid line to the enemy's 
troops, which he then perceived on Seminary Ridge. Birney, with 
Graham's and Ward's brigades of the Third Corps bearing to the 
left of Robinson, extended along the ridge which prolongs Ceme- 
tery Hill as far as the depression where the latter seems to lose 
itself for awhile, to rise again afterwards toward the Round Tops. 
Williams, with the other divisions of the sarne corps, had halted 
within a mile and a quarter in the rear of Cemetery Hill, on the left 
bank of Rock Creek, near the point where the fJaltimore road 
crosses this stream. Finally, Humphreys, who had not had time in 
daylight to choose a position, massed his two brigades a little to 
the rear and to the left of Birney's line. Meade, as soon as he 
saw the ground by daylight, saw that it possessed several weak 
spots ; but, being too late to withdraw, he hastened to strengthen 
everything by hurrying forward all the troops not yet at Gettysburg. 
By forced marches the whole army reached him by 9 a. m., with the 
exception of fifteen thousand men of the Sixth Corps, who were 
distant but a few hours. 

Lee's positions at daybreak on the 2d were as follows : Ewell's 
entire corps was drawn up on the battle-field, with Johnson on the 
left, resting on Rock Creek, upon Benner's Hill ; Early in the cen- 
ter, facing the ridge which connects Culp's Hill with Cemetery Hill ; 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. lOI 

Rodes on the right, at the foot of Cemetery Hill, his main force 
occupying the town of Gettysburg, while his right formed a connec- 
tion with the Third Corps on Seminary Ridge. The two divisions 
of the Third, those of Heth and Pender, retained the positions they 
had taken at sunset on the day previous. Pender was on the left, 
above the Seminary ; Heth on the right, along the ridge ; Hill's 
third division, under Anderson, was ])osted about one and a half 
miles in the rear, on the Cashtown road, between Marsh Creek and 
Willoughby Run. By 4 .a. m., Anderson was on his way to Semin- 
ary Ridge, closely followed by McLaw's and Hood's divisions — 
with the exception of Law's brigade — of the First Corps. At the 
same time, Pickett was leaving Chambersburg ; Laws, the village .of 
New Guilford ; and Stuart, Carlisle. By g a. m., therefore, the 
entire Confederate army enveloped Gettysburg, with the exception 
of Stuart's cavalry and the six thousand men of Laws and Pickett. 

Meade, on examining the ground, issued his orders, and rectified 
his positions, and placed the constantly-arriving troops in position, 
all of which was accomplished by 9 a. ^r. During the five hours 
up to this time, the enemy had not fired a shot or anno'yed the 
Union commander at all. Nor did he do so until much more 
precious time had been wasted in the most extraordinary fashion : 
for time was everything to the Confederate chieftain. He decided 
early on the 2d to attack the Federal left, and to intrust the com- 
mand to Longstreet. The sound of the battle is to be the signal 
for an attack on the Federal left by Evvell, and, if success seems to 
favor these attacks, the center, under Hill, is to attack the center 
of Meade's line. This plan makes success dependent upon the 
combined action of several corps between which there is absolutely 
no connection, a plan that has failed so often as to have almost 
become a dead law of battle. 

The sun by this time has crossed the zenith, and the same 
strange ominous silence broods over the fields separating the two 
armies. Meade is more and more astonished at Lee's inaction. The 
signal-men on Round Top signal Meade that Confederate troops 
are moving to the south. All morning skirmishing, more or less 
severe, has been going on on Meade's left, and he is now assured 
that the attack will be there. This is the view taken by Sickles, 
who, considering that his instructions have not been definite, under- 
takes, on his own responsibility, to push forward and occupy the 
Emmettsburg road, possessing himself of Sherfy's peach-orchard. 
The position was appreciated by Lee, and Longstreet's first purpose 



I02 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

was to obtain it. Meade, on reaching the ground, saw at once that 
it could not be held by the troops then present, and hastened for 
reinforcements. It was, however, too late to fall back. The Con- 
federate artillery were pouring shot and shell into the orchard, and, 
a little more to the east, the rattle of musketry disclosed the fact 
that Hood had opened the fight. 

For some time the fire of the artillery was tremendous. It 
proved but the introduction to more deadly work. Longstreet had 
formed his lines under cover, and was now moving down to strike 
the extreme left of Meade's line. With a wild charge they con- 
fronted the troops of Ward, who were enabled to beat them back. 
But Ward realized at once that he could not withstand a second 
assault. De Trobriand, therefore, at his request, sent him the 17th 
Maine, which took position behind a low stone wall to the left of 
the wheat-field, where it could do effective work if Ward should be 
forced back. The 17th Maine was followed by the 40th New York, 
which took position on Ward's left, so as to block the way to Little 
Round Top. The attack was not again directed against Ward, but 
against the whole of Birney's line, reaching forward to the orchard. 
De Trobriand's men were assaulted with murderous fire and des- 
perate courage. The troops of Graham, which were on open 
ground and had no protection, were in imminent danger of being 
cut to pieces. The cut where the road-bed makes up to the 
Emmettsburg way afforded a slight protection from artillery-fire, 
but was of no avail when the Confederate infantry charged. The 
141st Pennsylvania was posted in support of the Federal guns at 
this point, facing south. The men were lying down when the 
charge came, and were unperceived by the foe, which swept forward 
to seize the guns. Suddenly the men of the 141st rose, poured in a 
well-directed volley, and followed the smoke of their guns with a 
wild bayonet-charge. Swept down by ranks, and bewildered by 
the suddenness of the unexpected regiment, the Confederate line 
halted, paused, trembled and fled. The horses of the Union artil- 
lery having all been killed, the guns were drawn back by the infan- 
try to the rear of the road-bed. 

While this wave of battle, extending from the Round Top west 
to the orchard, was rolled again and again at the devoted line of 
blue-coats. Hood, who had instantly appreciated the value of Round 
Top on seeing it, was organizing a movement to attempt its cap- 
ture. He had discovered that Little Round Top was not occupied, 
and that only a thin curtain, composed of the 99th Pennsylvania, 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. IO3 

was hung in front of the hill. This place he regarded as the prize 
of the day. Selecting his most trusted men for the assault, he led 
them out and pointed to the dark ground of the rocky summit 
which he desired them to possess. On they rushed with wild im- 
petuosity ; but, before they could reach the thin line of the 99th, 
succor had come. The 40th New York, the 6th New Jersey, and 
the 4th Massachusetts arrived and occupied the path across Plum 
Run. With desperate valor the enemy penetrate the Union line, 
and, with still further impetuosity, rush on to the foot of the moun- 
tain-side. Suddenly a sheet of flame bursts in their astonished 
faces. The hill, ten minutes ago unoccupied, swarms at its base 
with the men of Vincent's brigade, ordered to Little Round Top by 
Sykes, at the request of General Warren, who has appreciated to 
the full the importance of this hill. In addition, Warren, hastening 
to some troops he sees moving close by, finds them to be the third 
brigade of Ayres's division of the Fifth Corps, under General Weed. 
The first regiment Warren encounters is commanded by an old 
friend, Colonel O'Rorke, who, in answer to Warren's demands, 
causes the column of the 140th New York to directly scale the 
acclivities of Little Round Top. This the men do willingly. 

All the while Laws's soldiers are pressing Vincent, who defends 
his position at the point of the muzzle. It is almost hand to hand. 
Laws, seeing the resistance offered by this small band, determines 
to end it by a flank movement, at the expense of the i6th Michigan. 
Extending his left, he attacks with impetuosity, and carries his 
point. The i6th is unable to resist, gives way, Vincent is cut off 
from the rest of the army, and cannot, therefore, protect the point 
of the position — the summit of Little Round Top — on which the 
officers of the Signal Corps are still waving their colors. At the 
very moment the i6th Michigan gives way and Laws's men break 
for the summit, O'Rorke's soldiers reach the top at full run, which 
Warren has pointed out to them as a citadel to be held at all odds. 
Not a moment too soon do they arrive. There is no time to con- 
template the battle-field below, which is enveloped in a pall of sul- 
phurous smoke. Laws's soldiers are just appearing on the other 
side. There is no time to form a line, load their guns, or fix bayo- 
nets. O'Rorke, seizing the position in a glance, calls on his willing 
men. The enemy fires : a large number of the 140th fall on the 
soil they have never seen, but so well won. With a wild scream, 
the rest, clubbing their muskets and raising them on high, dash 
down upon those who a moment since deemed themselves victors. 



I04 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

The Confederate advance is checked ; the prize seems lost. The 
foremost of T.aws's men are taken prisoners, and a terribl^fire is 
opened on the remainder. Vincent's right, having recovered from 
its check, now dashes forward once more. Hazlett's battery, which, 
after the most extraordinary exertions on the part of the men of 
the 140th New York, has been hauled to the summit, now takes 
position, though menaced by showers of bullets. The guns cannot 
be depressed enough to do damage to the enemy on the immediate 
slope below their muzzles, and they are therefore trained on the 
Confederate reserve in the valley, and the sound of the guns encour- 
ages the Lhiion infantry. The valiant O'Rorke has unhappily 
fallen ; the 140th has lost over one hundred men in a few minutes ; 
the battle waxes more and more intense. Another attempt to pierce 
the line is made by Laws, but Vincent hastens there with a few 
reinforcements, and the attempt is defeated. Vincent falls a victim 
to his bravery. Hood is severely wounded, and the combatants, 
somewhat exhausted, pause for breath. 

On the other side of Plum Run, at this time, the Union positions 
so stubbornly defended by Ward and De Trobriand are seriously 
compromised by the arrival of Kershaw, who forces Barnes off the 
ground he is holding. Ward is obliged to abandon the entire hill of 
the Devil's Den. The Confederates, crowding the wood, take the 
17th Maine, posted behind the wall, in flank, and, rushing across 
to the wheat-field, force Winslow's guns to the rear, and menace De 
Trobriand's weak line. De Trobriand is at the same time assailed 
in front by Anderson's men, and is compelled to give way. The 
troops in the orchard on his right cannot give him any assistance, 
for the artillery which they are there to ilefend is now threatened 
by Kershaw's left. The 8th South Carolina makes a valiant attempt 
to capture the guns of Clark and Bigelow, but are stopped by an 
appalling fire from the 141st Pennsylvania, who suddenly rise from 
a sunken road. Under cover of this success, the guns are hauled 
back beyond the position of peril. This further uncovers De Tro- 
briand's right. Caldwell's strong division now arrives, in time to 
relieve Birney and Barnes. One brigade, under Cross, advances to 
De Trobriand's support ; a second, under Kelly, which has crossed 
Plum Run near the road, supports Ward along the slopes bordering 
this stream a little lower down. This is Meagher's Irish brigade, 
and they go into the fight in characteristic fashion. When within 
range of the enemy, the command is halted, the men kneel, and 
their chaplain, a priest of Rome, standmg on a high rock, a natural 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 105 

pulpit, pronounces a general absolution. The "Amen" of the 
priest is simultaneous with Kelly's " Forward ! " and, with the 
Church's benediction, these brave fellows rush onward. Their on- 
slaught stays the advance of Anderson's brigade. The priest and 
the soldier together have been irresistible. 

In the meantime, Rirney, rallying around Cross a portion of De 
Trobriand's soldiers and Burling's two regiments, which have been 
driven in on that side, calls on them to follow him, and a dash is 
made at Kershaw's line, which cannot resist this assault, and is 
forced back on Somms's brigade, a hundred and fifty yards to the 
rear. These troops advance against Caldwell's first line, which, los- 
ing heavily, is supplanted by the second, composed of the brigades 
of Zook and Brooke. These men drive Somms to the other side of 
the ravine. Kershaw, on the left, is likewise dislodged by the 
fury of Caldwell's attack, and the Confederates find it necessary to 
retire, as it were, for breath to renew the struggle. Hood is now 
exhausted, and McLaws, seeing that Somms and Kershaw are un- 
able to hold their ground, decides to direct the main attack on the 
orchard. Sickles has given Graham the effectives of two brigades 
to defend it, but it would require strong intrenchments to cover so 
destitute a position. The Confederate artillery-fire is slackened ; 
the infantry, under Barksdale of Mississippi, strikes Graham's flank 
that faces westward. Woffard, with some of Kershaw's battalions, 
leaps upon Graham from the south, and the devoted Union com- 
mander passes through a vortex of fire to find himself wounded and 
a prisoner. His soldiers are prisoners or dispersed. The orchard 
is captured after a prolonged and gallant defense. The batteries 
along the Emmettsburg road are withdrawn : it is no longer possi- 
ble to maintain them. Those on the left are being fired as they are 
withdrawn. They crowd forward. Birney is defeated : more than 
half his men are lost. Barksdale pushes on to the front. Woffard 
bears to the eastward, in order to take in flank the regiments that 
hold Kershaw in check. Anderson's three brigades, under Wilcox, 
Perry and Wright, hasten to dislodge Humphreys from his position 
on the Emmettsburg road. It is about a quarter to seven. Hum- 
phreys's left is turned, and, ordered by Birney, he executes a 
masterly movement to the rear, reforming his line of battle under 
the most difficult circumstances. By this time, Barnes and Caldwell 
are finally driven out of the wheat-field. Zook is killed on this 
bloody ground. The Federal line is irrevocably broken, and all the 
forces which till then have held Longstreet in check are no longer 



I06 BATILE OF GETTYSBURG. 

able to reform it. A gradual concentration and falling back on 
Little Round Top, the real point of support for the Federal left, 
now takes place. It was inevitable. 

Let us now return to this splendid position, which we left on the 
temporary cessation of the Confederate attack. Weed's brigade 
has been ordered by Sykes to reinforce the 140th New York, and 
has promptly complied. Weed reaches there at the moment Vin- 
cent falls mortally wounded, and when both sides are preparing to 
renew the fight. Laws makes a determined onslaught on the 20th 
Maine, and a hand-to-hand fight ensues. Weed sets an example of 
heroic bravery, and falls mortally wounded by the side of Hazlett's 
battery. Hazlett, bending down to receive the dying man's last 
words, is also struck, and falls lifeless upon the body of his chief. 
The carnage is fearful. Happily the enemy is nearly exhausted, 
and, in his attempt to surround the left of the Federals, he has pro- 
longed his line too much. Colonel Chamberlain takes advantage 
of it to charge the enemy in turn, which so surprises the Confeder- 
ates that they fall back in dismay, leaving more than three hundred 
wounded and prisoners. The brigades of General Ayres on Plum 
Run, and the arrival of Crawford with McCandless's brigade on Lit- 
tle Round Top, suffice to drive the enemy over Plum Run, with 
which movement ceases the struggle for the possession of this van- 
tage-ground. It has been bitter, costly, desperate and triumphant 
for its defenders. 

The battle continues for the possession of the hills in and about 
Plum Run. Barksdale and Woffard attack Humphreys's weak divi- 
sion, and Hancock — -who took command on the retirement of 
Sickles — hurries to the support of Humphreys all the forces at his 
disposal. Two regiments of Hays's division, Willard's brigade, and 
thirty or forty pieces of reserve artillery under Major McGilvery, 
accomplish the immediate support, while Meade, summoning from 
the right, sends Williams's division, closely followed by one of 
Geary's brigades, under Candy, and preceded by Lockwood's two 
regiments, to the front. Three other brigades are also hurried for- 
ward, and Meade calls upon General Newton to weaken Cemetery 
Hill as much as possible, in order to assist Humphreys. The final 
assault of the Confederates on the Union left now takes place, and 
is led by Anderson, McLaws, Wilcox and Barksdale, Longstreet 
directing in person. Hood could not advance, owing to the posses- 
sion of Plumb Run and Little Round Top by the Federals. These 
are ready to receive them, and have now occupied Big Round Top 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. lO/ 

also, thus closing all access on that end. The fight becomes furi- 
ous. The fiery Barksdale is shot, under the fire of Burling's regi- 
ment. His soldiers, carried away by his bravery, rush upon the 
Federals, but are thrown back in disorder, leaving their dying chief 
in the hands of the Unionists. Woffard, who is supporting Barks- 
dale on the right, cannot go beyond the flats of Plum Run ; Ander- 
son's brigade, on the left, is not within reach. Longstreet waits in 
vain for Somms and Kershaw, whose brigades have suffered too 
much, and cannot renew the attack. At this moment Anderson's 
division scales the slopes along which Humphreys and Gibbon are 
posted. Wilcox, on the right, followed at a considerable distance 
by Perry, leads the attack. On the left, Wright, receiving the 
oblique fire of several guns posted on the edge of a small wood 
above Gibbon's front, rushes forward and captures them ; but 
Webb's brigade, emerging from its position, makes a desperate 
stand in defense of the hill. Wright, encouraged by the sight of 
the crowds that are encumbering the Baltimore road, believes he is 
about to become the master of the hill, and fights with sublime fury. 
In fifteen minutes he loses two-thirds of his effective force, and is 
compelled to fall back before Gibbon's division, which is facing 
him with ideal courage. Wilcox, taken in flank by McGilvery's 
artillery, instead of the retreating soldiers he supposed he was pur- 
suing, comes suddenly upon Humphreys's ( in good order) and 
Hancock's reserves, and into a circle of fire which in a breath strips 
from him five hundred men of the sixteen hundred with him. Dis- 
pirited, broken, sullen, he retires to the Emmettsburg road. The 
last effort against the Federals has failed ; and, as the twilight 
creeps in to cover the scene of blood and death, the musketry-fire 
ceases, the artillery languishes, and the pall of smoke drifts away 
on the rising night-breeze. The agony here is over. 

During most of this time, Ewell, commanding the Confederate 
left, has been waiting the sound of Longstreet's guns to convey to 
him the order for attack. A contrary wind prevailing, he does not 
hear the sounds of battle until five o'clock. Then he prepares at 
once. Six batteries on Benner's Hill open fire in support of the 
attack of Johnson's division on the Federal positions on Gulp's Hill. 
An hour suffices to silence the fire of these guns, so well is the Fed- 
eral artillery served. Finding an attempt on the north and northeast 
sides of Gulp's Hill impossible, Johnson determines to attack the 
Federals in the very gorges of Rock Greek, in order to turn their 
positions by way of the southeast. About half-past six he is in posi- 



I08 BATTLE OF GE'lTYSBURG. 

tion and opens fire, and for the first time on the 2d^of July the 
battle is in progress along the whole front of both armies. 

While Johnson was pushing in the right of the line on Gulp's 
Hill, those who defended Cemetery Hill were about to face the first 
historic charge of the battle — that of the Louisiana Tigers. The 
summit of Cemetery Hill was held by Weidrick's and Rickett's 
batteries, supported by a part of the Eleventh Corps, under cover of 
stone walls. To the right of Cemetery Hill, at right angles to it, 
was the beginning of Culp's Hill, upon a small plateau of which was 
planted Stevens's Maine battery. His guns enfiladed the approaches 
to Cemetery Hill. On the right of Stevens's battery began the 
heavy breastworks erected by Wadsworth on the top of Culp's Hill, 
and overhanging its precipitous sides. This earth-work was carried 
round the hill, and was continued by Greene, whose right rested at 
a ravine that declines to a thickly-wooded plateau. These breast- 
works were continued beyond the ravine, but at this hour had no 
infantry to make them effective, the troops having been ordered to 
Round Top. 

Just as the sun was disappearing in the red west and the soft 
gray shadows of twilight were gathering like a ghostly army, the 
defenders of Cemetery Hill saw emerging from behind an eminence 
near the town a long line of infantry formed for assault. Onward 
the column moved with the precision of a parade and all the stead- 
iness of a holiday spectacle. The line was formed of the brigades 
of Hays and Hoke, led by the famous Louisiana Tigers. The 
moment they came in sight, they faced the test of death. Stevens 
opened on them with every gun : W'eidrick and Ricketts joined in 
the chorus. The slaughter was immediately terrible ; men fell 
dead before the iron storm at the rate of a dozen a minute. The 
guns of Ricketts were charged with canister, and they fired every 
fifteen seconds. Stevens's battery, enfilading the Confederate line, 
wreaked furious destruction upon the storming column, which, 
through it all, in the face of the very hell of war, kept on their 
upward way. As the Tigers came within musket-range of the crest 
of Cemetery Hill, Howard's infantry, hidden behind the stone wall, 
poured volley after volley into the faces of the wild-hearted and 
maddened men. But the eyes of two armies were on the Tigers ; 
they carried the guerdon of fame that they had never failed in a 
charge. They could not halt now, the hour of their hardest trial. 
Over the stone walls they went at a bound. Stevens was obliged to 
cease firing, for fear of kilhng friends. Weidrick is unable to with- 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. I09 

Stand the shock ; his supports and his men are swept back together 
before the force of that human tornado. Ricketts quails not ; the 
full strength of the storm, falling on his devoted men, falls in vain. 
His left piece is taken : the Tigers are within the cage. The re- 
maining guns are still served with admirable discipline and coLirage, 
drivers and officers taking the places of the dead cannoneers. A 
struggle takes place for the guidon ; it is in the hands of a Tiger ; 
Lieutenant Brockway seizes a stone, hurls it full at the head of the 
soldier, which fells him to the ground, and in a moment the Tiger 
is shot with his own musket. The wildest confusion — a bedlam of 
terror — now ensues. The rapidly-gathering darkness makes friends 
and foes indistinguishable. The men at the batteries are being 
overpowered by their desperate and maddened assailants, but still 
they cling to their guns ; with hand-spikes, rammers and stones 
they defend their position, shouting to one another : " Death on 
our own State soil rather than give the enemy the guns ! '" The 
moment is most critical ; the fate of the issue is near at hand. At 
this instant Carroll's brigade rushes in to the rescue ; with wild 
shouts they burst upon the almost exhausted foe. They waver, 
they turn, they retreat in confusion. Ricketts's men fly to their 
guns, double-shot them, and fire deadly parting salutes at the 
defeated Tigers. Their charge is over ; they have been beaten. 
Nearly twelve hundred of their seventeen hundred are left dead 
and dying. It has been indeed a bloody half-hour's work. They 
pass down the hill, out into the darkness, and are seen no more in 
history. 

All the while Johnson is battling with persistent force against 
Greene on Gulp's Hill. Unable to beat in his line defending the 
breastworks, he seizes the line thrown up by Ruger and Geary and 
abandoned when these commanders were ordered to reinforce the 
Federals on Plum Run. Again and again Johnson assails Greene, 
and again and again is he driven back with dismay. Finding it 
impossible to break down this gallant soldier, Johnson pushes on 
past Gulp's Hill, and has almost reached the Baltimore pike when 
the now offensive darkness comes to the aid of the Federals, and 
Johnson halts his men. The battle of the second day is over, and 
in the deep shadows of welcome night the tired men throw them- 
selves down, not caring whether the sod or a corpse is their pillow. 
In the early hours of the night the leaders sum up the day's 
total. During the terrible storm, the Confederates have acquitted 
themselves with the courage and ardor that have so frequently 



no BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

secured victory to them. Nevertheless, they have not achieved the 
results which they were entitled to expect from their enormous 
sacrifices. The condition of the battle-field has been against them, 
and in favor of the Union arms. Though defeated on the rigln, 
they have won such advantages on the left that Lee is more than 
justified in renewing the attack. The situation of Meade, in spite of 
the advantages he has gained, is properly alarming. His losses are 
enormous — more than twenty thousand for two days' fighting ! The 
enemy has not spoken his best word, and the Union commander 
is fearful lest another day's conflict equally murderous would cause 
his army to melt away into nothing. A council of war decides 
to fight it out on the morrow, and the rest of the now moonlit 
night is occupied in preparations for the coming final and fierce 
whirlwind of strife that is to decide the battle and the life of the 
Republic. 



THE THIRD DAY. 

July 3, 1863. 

Summary ok Points. — 3.40 a. m,, Federal attack on Confederate left, on Gulp's 
Hill. Final repulse and re-occupation of Gulp's Hill positions, 11 A. M. Federal 
cavalry attack on Confederate trains on Confederate right. Sharp skirmishing 11 
to 11.45 A. M. I p. M., artillery-duel begins. Pickett's charge, 2.30 i'. M. Final 
repulse of Confederate attack about 3.15 p. m. Desultory fighting up to 6 p. M. 
Duration of fighting on Federal right, seven hours ; on Federal left, about five 
hours. 

The kindly moon lights up the battle-field all the night of the 
2d-3d, as though it were desirous nothing should hinder the prompt 
resumption of hostilities. The wounded are cared for as far as pos- 
sible, and the lines of both armies are rectified and strengthened. 
Lee intends to renew his attack on the P^ederal right, where John- 
son has gained such an advantage, and attempt also to pierce the 
Union center. Meade determines to push Johnson back, and then 
to await developments. Li addition to his reports from the battle- 
field, Meade is aware that Stuart and Kilpatrick have met, and 
fought a sharp engagement, which has, however, no bearing on the 
final conflict of both armies, now about to take place. 

During the night, Geary's and Ruger's divisions were ordered 
back to Gulp's Hill. Geary, finding his old ground occupied, formed 
on Greene's right. Ruger took position on the flank and rear of 



BATTLE OK GETTYSBURG. Ill 

Johnson's men. Shortly after 3 a. m., (General Kane observed the 
enemy moving about, preparatory, presumably, to a charge. Report- 
ing to Geary, that officer promptly took the offensive, and at twenty 
minutes before four, discharged his pistol as a signal for o.pening 
the attack. The conflict, thus begun, continued for seven hours 
with intense bitterness. The firing of the Union troops was most 
effective : the Confederate charges, which were made with great 
spirit, availed nothing. The artillery-fire from the Union lines was 
well directed, and accomplished much damage : the Confederate 
forces being unable to get their artillery into any position from 
which an effective reply could be made. As the day wears on, the 
sun beats upon the troops with unstinted fury, making the terrible 
situation more terrible still. The struggle is terrific : hand to hand, 
man to man, almost impossible to describe, as it is made up of in- 
cidents of bravery and accidents of death as numerous as the com- 
batants themselves. A terrific charge by Stonewall Jackson's old 
command, made with useless heroism upon Kane's brigade of 
Geary's division, failing, Johnson was at last convinced — at 11 a. m. 
— that he could effect nothing further, and, to a return-charge of 
Geary's division, he yielded his ground slowly and reluctantly. 
With a yell of congratulation, Geary's men re-occupied their breast- 
works. This ended all attempts to turn the Federal right, and, 
beyond a fusilade now and again when anything showed itself, the 
Confederate forces of Ewell gave their opponents no further trouble. 
The final scene is now to transpire before the eyes of the devoted 
men of both armies. One more terrific tableau and the battle is 
done. Lee will attempt to break the Federal center. He had 
failed to break the left — he had failed to turn the right. He must 
pierce the center, or retreat. For this purpose, he has Pickett's 
division — the flower of the grand old commonwealth of Virginia — 
which has not yet been in action, and which is full of enthu- 
siasm. They will lead, they will follow, anywhere. He decides to 
launch them on the center, and to support them on both flanks by 
an advance of the balance of his available army. It will be a su- 
preme effort — the last desperate chance of a desperate man. Long- 
street's men, the soldiers under Hood and McLaws, have suffered 
too much to undertake the support of Pickett. They remain inac- 
tive spectators of Pickett's efforts. Lee therefore forms Pickett's 
division in two lines — Kemper and Garnett leading, supported by 
Armistead, with Wilcox and Perry, of Hill's Corps, on his right, 
and Pettigrew, commanding Heth's division, and Trimble, with two 



112 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

of Pender's brigades, of Hill's Corps, for a like purpiDse on his left. 
Pickett explains the purpose of the charge, and designates to each 
officer his exact position. Everything is ready to go forward, after 
the artillery has cleared the way. Longstreet does not approve of 
the assault. Lee overrules his objections ; and the plan, as pro- 
jected by the Confederate commander, is executed. 

To the Confederate artillery is entrusted the heavy work. At 
daybreak, Colonel Alexander places the six reserve batteries of the 
First Corps along the Emmettsburg road ; the rest of the artillery 
of this corps is presently posted in this vicinity, and both form a 
slightly concave line, of seventy-five pieces, from the peach-orchard 
to a point which commands the road east of the Godori house, at a 
distance of from nine hundred to thirteen hundred yards from the 
Federal line. The batteries of Major Henry, to the right of the 
orchard, cross their fire with that of the rest of the line. Alexan- 
der's batteries are ranged above this position, at the summit of the 
slope running down to the Trostle house. On his left, and some- 
what in his rear, is located the Washington Artillery, with Bearing's 
and Cabell's battalions. To this line, Meade was not able to oppose 
as many guns, owing to the shorter space at his disposal. At Ceme- 
tery Hill, on the right, were the batteries of Ricketts, Wiedrick, 
Dilger, Bancroft, Eakm, Wheeler, Hill, and Taft, under command 
of Major Osborn. Next to him, and directly in front of Meade's 
headquarters, extending from Ziegler's Grove south along Hancock's 
front, were the batteries of Woodruff, Arnold, Gushing, Brown, and 
Rorty, commanded by Major Hazard. Still further on the Federal 
left was Major McGilvery, commanding the batteries of Thomas, 
Thompson, Phillips, Hart, Sterling, Roch, Cooper, Dow, and Ames. 
Gibbs and Rittenhouse held the summit of Little Round Top. 
Eighty guns were thus in effective position. The Union infantr}- 
supporting this artillery consists of Robinson's division of the First 
Corps, at Ziegler's Grove, and to his left the divisions of Hays and 
Gibbon, of the Second Corps, and that of Doubleday, of the First. 
To the left again were Caldwell, of the Second, and parts of the 
Third, Fifth and Sixth Corps. 

By one o'clock, the enemy having perfected his arrangements, 
Longstreet reluctantly sends word to Colonel Walton to give signal. 
Two cannon-shots, fired on the right by the Washington Artillery 
at an interval of a minute, break the silence brooding over the 
scorched and waiting battle-field. The signal is well understood 
by both armies, and the solitary smoke of these shots has not dis- 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. II3 

parsed before the whole Confederate line is ablaze. The throats of 
one hundred and thirty-eight cannon obey the signal, and send 
forth a concerted roar that rivals the angriest thunder. The Fed- 
eral guns wait, under General Hunt's orders, fifteen minutes before 
replying, in order to take a survey of the batteries upon which they 
must concentrate their fire. Their positions afford better shelter 
than tht)se of the enemy, but the formation of the Federal line 
affords the Confederates the advantages of a concentric fire. By 
1. 15 p. M., the reply is made. More than two hundred guns are 
now engaged in the most tremendous and most terrible artillery- 
duel every witnessed in the New World. Every size and form of 
shell, known to British and American gunner}', shrieks, moans, 
whistles and wrathfully flutters over the ground. As many as six 
in a second — for the Confederate batteries fire volleys constantly 
twice in a second — bursting and screaming, carry destruction every- 
where, and everywhere ruin and dismay. It is a hell of fire, that 
amazes the greatest veteran present. The wild death-screams of 
the shells are answered with the peculiar yells of the dying : the 
blent cry of pain, and horror and despair ! It is an hour of terror. 
Death is master of the situation. The roar of the iron storm can- 
not drown the accordant shriek of the dying, the wild curse of the 
wounded, the avenging oaths of the living. Was there ever such a 
scene ? The fire of the Federals is effective, but General Hunt, 
anticipating the infantry-attack soon to follow, orders a cessation, 
and the liatteries on Cemetery Hill cease their angry answers. 
They are followed by the rest, and soon the Confederate guns hear 
no reply but the echoes of their own attack. By their cannoneers 
this silence is interpreted to mean that the ammunition has given 
out, and that the Federal position is now assailable. The Confed- 
erate fire ceases. Its silence is ominous: it is the calm that just 
precedes the maddest fury of the storm. 

Pickett rides up to Longstreet and asks for orders to advance. 
The movement is so contrary to Longstreet's judgment, that that 
general is silent. He answers nothing. Pickett says to his supe- 
rior, proudly : " I shall go forward, sir ! " And then, from out the 
woods which contain the Confederate fortified line, there bursts a 
splendid mass of infantry, which is quickly marshaled in magnificent 
line of battle. It is a compact formation, fourteen thousand strong. 
At the word, the men start forward : 

Firm-paced and slow, a horrid front they form, 
Still as the breeze, but dreadful as the storm ! 



114 BATTLE OF GETTYbBURG. 

Nothing interrupts the view of this superb movement. The 
dullest soldier can comprehend as readily as his general the purpose 
and power of this advancing host. The shock will be great — possi- 
bly fatal ! Full of ardor as if rushing to assault the capital of the 
nation, yet marching with measured steps so as not to break the 
alignment, on come these valiant men, treading steadily forward, 
while yet aware that each step brings them nearer certain death. 
Solidly quiet, magnificent is their progress. Marching in the direc- 
tion of the salient position occupied by Hancock, Pickett, after 
passing beyond the front of Wilcox, causes each of his brigades to 
make a half-wheel to the left. This movement is hardly completed 
before McGilvery leads off with the fire of the P'ederal batteries : 
a cloud-burst of flame. This, though well directed, does not suffice 
to check the soldiers of Pickett. Another half-wheel to the right, 
and Pickett is in a perilous position. Wilcox has separated from 
him, and uncovered his right ; Pettigrew, on his left, either cannot 
or will not push forward his supports, and the Federal line is within 
musket-range. Still the advance is unchecked : Pickett cannot go 
back. Solid shot, shells, shrapnel, and canister are poured forth 
in unstinted measure. 

Never was a grander sight, never a more matchless courage. 
Carnage is here and now personified. A single shot of McGilvery, 
firing upon Pickett's flank, kills ten men. Then the Union infantry 
pours in a volley. Pickett's front rank is decimated in a second. 
Staggering a moment, it moves again. The men rush forward at 
double-quick. The furious fusilade is uninterrupted. Garnett, whose 
brigade is in the advance, falls dead within a hundred yards of the 
Union front. His men rush madly upon the parts'of the line where 
are the 69th and 71st. This brings them under the fire of Stan- 
nard's brigade, which has occupied a small woods in advance and 
to the left of the point of Pickett's attack. Hancock, always alert 
to seize a favorable opportunity, forms them to take the enemy's 
line in flank. Two regiments from Armistead's right are decimated 
and disorganized by this movement. The remainder of this brigade 
throws itself in the rear of the center of Pickett's line. Armistead, 
urging his men forward, reaches the front rank between Kemper 
and Garnett — if it yet be possible to distinguish regiments and brig- 
ades in this compact mass of human beings, which, all covered 
with blood, seems to be driven by an irresistible force superior to 
the individual will of those composing it — and throws himself upon 
the Union line. The shock is terrific : it falls first on the brigades 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. II5 

of Hall and Harrow, then concentrates itself on that of Webb. 
The Confederates pierce the first hne of the Federals, but the latter 
fall back upon the second small earthworks near the artillery. 
These pieces now lire grape-shot. Hancock and Gibbon hurry up 
the reserves. Hall rectifies his line, which has been outflanked on 
the right, Harrow advances with his left, and almost takes Pickett 
in reverse. The regiments become mixed ; commanders do not 
know where their soldiers are ; the fighting is the struggle of a 
mob. Commands are of no avail : they cannot be heard or obeyed. 
A clump of trees just within the angle-wall is the Confederate 
objective point. Armistead, on foot, his hat waving on the point of 
his sword, rushes forward to attack the battery. With one hundred 
and fifty devoted men, who will follow him anywhere, he pierces 
the mass of combatants, passes the earthworks, and reaches Cush- 
ing's guns, which can no longer fire for fear of killing friends. 
Gushing, mortally wounded in both thighs, runs his last serviceable 
gun down to the fence, and shouts : "Webb, I will give them one 
more shot." He fires the gun, calls out " Good-by ! " and falls 
dead beside his- piece. Armistead answers the challenge : " Give 
them the cold steel, boys ! " and lays his hand upon a gun. Ikit, at 
that moment, by the side of Gushing, his young and gallant adver- 
sary, intrepid Armistead falls, pierced with balls. They both lie at 
the foot of the clump of trees, which marks the extreme point 
reached by the Confederates in this, their supremest effort. Where 
Gushing and Armistead lie is where the tide of invasion stops. The 
Confederate cause is buried there : there, beneath the blood of as 
brave soldiers as ever carried sword or faced the march of death. 
The men who came forward here, when defeated, did not fall back: 
there was no one left to return. 

The brigades of Wilcox and Perry, failing to move with Pickett's 
division, having sheltered themselves for a moment, no sooner see 
that Pickett has gone forward and penetrated the Union line, than 
they hurry up to assault a little further to the south, in Hancock's 
face. The Union line attacks with vigor, and Stannard attacks the 
exposed flank from his vantage-ground. But feeble resistance is 
offered : the assault is over quickly, numbers are taken prisoners, 
and the grandest charge of the war is spent. The battle of Gettys- 
burg is won. For, with the exception of two spirited and desperate 
cavalry-contests between Gregg and Hampton, and Kilpatrick and 
Stuart, the fighting at Gettysburg is finished. Well may the devout 
follower of the cause of human liberty exclaim, with the command- 
ing general of the Union army : " Thank God ! " 



Il6 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 



THE VALLEY OE THE SHADOW OE DEATH, 



What remained of the regiments that crossed the Potomac on 
their way North, in June, under the command of colonels, recrossed 
that river in July under the command of corporals. It was thus that 
proud Army of Northern Virginia returned to the Old Dominion. 

The first part of Lee's army to retreat — the wounded — began 
their weary blood-stained journey on July 4th. General Imboden, 
who was designated by the Confederate chieftain to undertake the 
moving of the wounded, was sent for just before midnight, July 3d. 
An hour later, he saw his chief riding slowly up to headquarters. 
His horse was walking : its rider was evidently wrapped in profound 
thought. There were no sentinels on guard save the soft summer 
moon, which threw sad shadows over the blood-bestrewn field, now 
and forever lost to this silent man in gray. No staff-officer accom- 
panied him ; he came alone, as if the burden of the day's disaster 
had stripped him of his friends, as it had of his cause. Riding 
alone, he seemed the personification of the Lost Cause — lost on the 
fields of Gettysburg, now covered by thousands of weary men, 
thousands of wounded, thousands of the dead ! 

As he approached and noticed the young general, Lee reined up 
his horse and essayed to dismount. The effort to do so betrayed 
so much physical exhaustion that Liiboden stepped forward to 
assist him. He alighted, threw his arm across his saddle to rest 
himself, and, fixing his eyes upon the ground, leaned in silence upon 
his weary horse, as motionless as a statue. Upon his dignified and 
expressive features was stamped the deepest seal of sadness. Imbo- 
den broke the silence : " General, this has been a hard day on you." 
Lee looked up and replied mournfully : '' Yes, it has been a sad, 
sad day to us." Then he relapsed into his thoughtful mood again. 
After a minute, broken only by the strange sounds of night, he 
straightened up to his full height, and said, with great animation, 
energy and excitement of manner, in a voice tremulous with emo- 
tion : " General, I never saw troops behave more magnificently 
than Pickett's division of Virginians did to-day in their grand charge 
upon the enemy. And, if they had been supported as they were to 
have been — but for some reason not yet fully explained they were 
not — we would have held the position they so gloriously won at 
such fearful loss of noble lives, and the dav would have been ours." 



BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. II 



After a moment he added, almost in a tone of agony : "Too bad ! 
Too bad ! Oh, too bad ! 

After a pause, instructions were given, and Imboden started to 
lead the weary march back to Virginia. Organizing his train, 
seventeen miles long, he moved at 4 i'. m., July 4th. Hardly was 
he well away from the heavy shadows of Gettysburg when the 
storm, which had begun at noon, grew to a gale. Canvas was no 
shield against it, and the poor wounded, lying upon the hard naked 
boards of the wagon-bodies, were drenched by the pitiless rain. 
Horses and mules, blinded and maddened by the storm, became 
almost unmanageable. The roar of the winds and waters made it 
almost impossible to communicate orders. From the rapidly-mov- 
ing wagons, now partly covered by the falling night, issued wails of 
agony. The men were wounded and mutilated in every conceivable 
way. Some had their legs shattered by a shell or minie-ball, some 
were shot through their bodies, others had arms torn to shreds, 
some had received a ball in the face, or a jagged piece of shell had 
lacerated their heads. Scarcely one in a hundred had received 
adequate surgical aid. Many had been without food for thirty-six 
hours. Their ragged, bloody and dirty clothes, clotted and hard- 
ened with blood, rasped the tender inflamed lips of their gaping 
wounds. Very few of the wagons had even straw in them, and all 
were without springs. The road was rough and rocky ; the jolting 
was enough to have killed strong men. As the horses trotted on, 
while the winds howled through the driving rain, there arose, from 
that awful procession of the dying, oaths and curses, sobs and 
prayers, moans and shrieks, that pierced the darkness and made the 
storm seem gentle : 

" Oh, God ! why can't I die ? " 

" My God ! will no one have mercy on me, and kill me, and end 
my misery ? " 

"Oh, stop one minute ! Take me put ; let me die on the road- 
side." 

" I am dying ! I am dying ! My poor wife — my dear children — 
what will become of you ? "' 

No help could be rendered to anyone. There was no time even 
to press a canteen to the lips of the dying. On, on, was the only 
thing, on into the night and storm — into the Valley of the Shadow 
of Death — into oblivion. The battle was lost ; the cause was 
decided. Liberty was triumphant ; slavery was abolished in the 
American republic forever. 



Il8 BA'l'TLE OF GICTTYSBURG. 

A word must be said, before leaving the story of the battle, 
as there will be many queries, about John Burns, who fought 
in the ranks with the I42d Regiment. Here are the words of 
Bret Harte which have given Burns immortality. They are 
not absolutely accurate, but represent the popular sentiment 
concerning the part which he bore in the great battle : 

Have you heard the story the gossips tell 

Of John Burns, of Gettysburg? No? Ah well. 

Brief is the glory that hero earns. 

Briefer the story of poor John Burns ; 

He was the fellow who won renown — 

The only man who didn't back down 

When the rebels rode through his native town ; 

But held his own in the fight next day, 

When all his townsfolk ran away. 

That was in July, sixty-three — 

The very day that General Lee, 

The flower of Southern chivalry, 

Baftled and beaten, backward reeled 

From a stubborn Meade and a barren field. 

I might tell how, but the day before, 

John Burns stood at his cottage door, 

Looking down the village street ; 

Where, in the shade of his peaceful vine, 

He heard the low of his gathered kine. 

And felt their breath with incense sweet ; 

Or, I might say, when the sunset burned 

The old farm gable, he thought it turned 

The milk, that fell in a babbling flood, 

Lito the milk-pail, red as blood ; 

Or how he fancied the hum of bees » 

Were bullets buzzing among the trees. 

But all such fanciful thoughts as these 

Were strange to a practical man like Burns, 

Who minded only his own concerns, 

Troubled no more by fancies fine 

Than one of his calm-eyed long-tailed kine — 

Quite old-fashioned and matter-of-fact, 

Slow to argue, but quick to act. 



BATTLE OF GETrVSRURG. I I9 

That was the reason, as some folks say, 
He fought so well on that terrible day. 

And it was terrible. On the right 

Raged for hours the heavy fight, 

Thundered the battery's double-bass — 

Difficult music for men to face ; 

While on the left — where now the graves 

Undulate like the living waves 

That all the day unceasing swept 

Up to the pits the rebels kept — 

Round-shot ploughed the upland glades, 

Sown with bullets, reaped with blades ; 

Shattered fences here and there 

Tossed their splinters in the air ; 

The very trees were stripped and bare ; 

The barns that once held yellow grain 

Were heaped with harvests of the slain : 

The cattle bellowed on the plain, 

The turkeys screamed with might and main, 

And brooding barn-fowl left their rest 

With strange shells bursting in each nest. 

Just where the tide of battle turns. 

Erect and lonely, stood old John Burns. 

How do you think the man was dressed ? 
He wore an ancient long buff vest — 
Yellow as saffron, but his best ; 
And buttoned over his manly breast 
Was a bright blue coat, with a rolling collar 
And large gilt buttons — size of a dollar — 
With tails that country-folk call "swaller." 
He wore a broad-brimmed bell-crowned hat. 
White as the locks on which it sat. 
Never had such a sight been seen 
For forty years on the village green. 
Since John Burns was a country beau, 
And went to the "quilting," long ago. 

Close at his elbows, all that day. 

Veterans of the Peninsula, 

Sunburnt and bearded, charged away. 



I20 BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, 

And striplings, downy of lip and chin — 
Clerks that the Home Guard mustered in — 
Glanced, as they passed, at the hat he wore, 
Then at the rifle his right hand bore, 
And hailed him, from out their youthful lore, 
With scraps of a slangy repertoire : 
" How are you, White Hat ? " " Put her through ! " 
" Your head's level ! " and " Bully for you ? " 
Called him " Daddy," and begged he'd disclose 
The name of the tailor who made his clothes, 
And what was the value he set on those ; 
While Burns, unmindful of jeer and scoff, 
Stood there picking the rebels off — 
With his long brown rifle and bell-crown hat. 
And the swallow-tails they were laughing at. 

'Twas but a moment : for that respect 

Which clothes all courage their voices checked ; 

And something the wildest could understand 

Spake in the old man's strong right hand, 

And his corded throat, and the lurking frown 

Of his eyebrows under his old bell-crown ; 

Until, as they gazed, there crept an awe 

Through the ranks, in whispers, and some men saw, 

In the antique vestments and long white hair. 

The Past of the Nation in battle there. 

And some of the soldiers since declare 

That the gleam of 'his old white hat afar. 

Like the prested plume of the brave Navarre, 

That day was their oriflamme of war. 

Thus raged the battle. You know the rest : 

How the rebels, beaten and backward pressed, 

Broke at the final charge and ran ; 

At which John Burns, a practical man, 

Shouldered his rifle, unbent his brows. 

And then went back to his bees and cows. 

This is the story of old John Burns — 
This is the moral the reader learns : 
In fighting the battle, the question's whether 
You'll show, a hat that's white, or a feather. 



SELECTIONS 



The following are a few songs, selections and clippings for 
the entertainment and amusement of those who may wish to 
read them. 

BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC. 

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord ; 

He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are 

stored ; 
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword : 
His truth is marching on. 

I have seen Him in the watch-fires of a hundred circling camps ; 
They have builded Him an altar in the evening dews and damps ; 
I have read His righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps : 
His day is marching on. 

I have read a fiery gospel writ in burnished rows of steel : 
" As ye deal with my contemners, so with you my grace shall deal ; 
Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the serpent with his heel. 
Since God is marching on." 

He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat ; 
He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgment-seat ; 
Oh, be swift, my soul, to answer Him ! be jubilant, my feet ! 
Our God is marching on. 

In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea. 
With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me ; 
As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, 
While God is marching on. 



\ 

122 SELECTIONS. 



THE RED, WHITE AND BLUE. 

O Columbia, the gem of the ocean. 

The home of the brave and the free ; 
The shrine of each patriot's devotion, 

A world offers homage to thee. 
Thy mandates make heroes assemble 

When Liberty's form stands in view ; 
Thy banners make tyranny tremble. 

When borne by the Red, White and Blue. 

Chorus — When borne by the Red, White and Blue, 
When borne by the Red, White and Blue, 

Thy banners make tyranny tremble, 
When borne by the Red, White and Blue. 

When war winged its wide desolation, 

And threatened the land to deform. 
The ark then of freedom's foundation, 

Columbia rode safe through the storm ; 
With her garlands of victory around her. 

When so proudly she bore her brave crew ; 
With her flag proudly floating before her, 

The boast of the Red, White and Blue. 

CHORifS — The boast of the Red, White and Blue, 
The boast of the Red, White and Blue, 

With her flag proudly floating before her. 
The boast of the Red, White and Blue. 

The wine cup, the wine cup, bring hither 

And fill you it true to the brim ; 
May the wreaths they have won never wither. 

Nor the star of their glory grow dim. 
May the service united never sever, 

But they to their colors prove true. 
The Army and Navy forever. 

Three cheers for the Red, White and Blue. 

Chorus — Three cheers for the Red, White and Blue, 
Three cheers for the Red, White and Blue, 

The Army and Navy forever, 
Three cheers for the Red, White and Blue. 



SELECTIONS. 1 23 

BARBARA FRIETCHIE. 

[ The incidents which gave rise to this poem are said to have occurred during 
Stonewall Jackson's march through Frederick City, Maryland, just before the 
battle of South Mountain, in September, 1862. Some of the facts narrated hav- 
ing been called in question, Mr. Whittier furnished the editor of " Bugle Echoes " 
(November 15, 1885) with the following particulars : "Of the substantial truth 
of the heroism of Barbara Frietchie I can have no doubt. Mrs. E. D. N. South- 
worth, the novelist, of Washington, sent me a slip from a newspaper, stating the 
circumstances as it is given in the poem, and assured me of its substantial correct- 
ness. Dorothea L. Dix, the philanthropic worker in the Union hospitals, con- 
firmed it. From half a dozen other sources I had the account, and all agree in 
the main facts. Barbara Frietchie was the boldest and most outspoken Unionist 
in Frederick, and manifested it to the Rebel army in an unmistakable manner."] 

Up from the meadows rich with corn, 
Clear in the cool September morn, 

The clustered spires of Frederick stand 
Green-walled by the hills of Maryland. 

Round about them orchards sweep, 
Apple and peach tree fruited deep, 

Fair as a garden of the Lord 

To the eyes of the famished rebel horde, 

On that pleasant morn of the early fall 
When Lee marched over the mountain wall — 

Over the mountains, winding down. 
Horse and foot into Frederick town. 

Forty flags with their silver stars, 
Forty flags with their crimson bars, 

Flapped in the morning wind : the sun 
Of noon looked down and saw not one. 

Up rose old Barbara Frietchie then. 
Bowed with her fourscore years and ten ; 

Bravest of all in Frederick town, 

She took up the flag the men hauled down ; 

In her attic window the staff she set, 
To show that one heart was loyal yet. 



\ 

124 SELECTIONS. 

Up the street came the rebel tread, 
Stonewall Jackson riding ahead. 

Under his slouched hat left and right 
He glanced : the old flag met his sight. 

" Halt ! " — the dust-brown ranks stood fast ; 
" Fire ! " — out blazed the rifle-blast. 

It shivered the window, pane and sash ; 
It rent the banner with seam and gash. 

Quick, as it fell, from the broken staff 
Dame Barbara snatched the silken scarf ; 

She leaned far out on the window-sill. 
And shook it forth with a loyal will. 

" Shoot, if you must, this old gray head, 
But spare your country's flag," she said. 

A shade of sadness, a blush of shame, 
Over the face of the leader came ; 

The nobler nature within him stirred 
To life at that woman's deed and word : 

" Who touches a hair of yon gray head 
Dies like a dog ! March on ! " he said. 

All day long through Frederick street 
Sounded the tread of marching feet ; 

All day long that free flag tost 
Over the heads of the rebel host. 

Ever its torn folds rose and fell 

On the loyal winds that loved it well ; 

And through the hill-gaps sunset light 
Shown over it with a warm good-night. 

Barbara Frietchie's work is o'er, 

And the Rebel rides on his raids no more. 

Honor to her ! and let a tear 

Fall, for her sake, on Stonewall's bier. 



SELECTIONS. 125 

Over Barbara Frietchie's grave, 
Flag of Freedom and Union, wave ! 

Peace and order and beauty draw 
Round thy symbol of light and law ; 

And ever the stars above look down 
On the stars below in Frederick town ! 

— John Greenleaf Whittier. 



MARCHING THROUGH GEORGIA. 

Bring the good old bugle, boys, we'll sing another song. 
Sing it with a spirit that will start the world along — 
Sing it as we used to sing it, fifty thousand strong. 
While we were marching through Georgia. 

Chorus. 

Hurrah ! hurrah ! we bring the jubilee ! 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! the flag that makes you free ! " 
So we sang the chorus from Atlanta to the sea, 
While we were marching through Georgia. 

How the darkeys shouted when they heard the joyful sound ! 
How the turkeys gobbled which our commissary found ! 
How the sweet potatoes even started from the ground. 
While we were marching through Georgia. — Cho. 

Yes, and there were Union men who wept with joyful tears, 
When they saw the honor'd flag they had not seen for years ! 
Hardly could they be restrained from breaking forth in cheers. 
While we were marching through Georgia. — Cho. 

" Sherman's dashing Yankee boys will never reach the coast ! ' 
So the saucy rebels said, and 'twas a handsome boast. 
Had they not forgot, alas ! to reckon with the host. 
While we were marching through Georgia ? — Cho. 

So we made a thoroughfare for Freedom and her train, 
Sixty miles in latitude-^three hundred to the main ; 
Treason fled before us, for resistance was in vain, 

While we were marching through Georgia. — Cho. 



\ 

126 SELECTIONS. 



SHERIDAN'S RIDE. 



[During General Sheridan's temporary absence his troops in the Shenandoah 
Valley were surprised and routed by the Confederates under General Early. The 
Union commander hurried to the front in time to rally his forces and turn defeat 
into victory — October 19, 1864.] 

Up from the South at break of day, 

Bringing to Winchester fresh dismay, 

The affrighted air with a shudder bore, 

Like a herald in haste, to the chieftain's door. 

The terrible grumble, and rumble, and roar. 

Telling the battle was on once more. 

And Sheridan twenty miles away. 

And wider still those billows of war. 

Thundered along the horizon's bar ; 

And louder yet into Winchester rolled 

The roar of that red sea uncontrolled, 

Making the blood of the listener cold, 

As he thought of the stake in that fiery fray, 

And Sheridan twenty miles away. 

But there is a road from Winchester town, 

A good broad highway leading down ; 

And there, through the flush of the morning light, 

A steed as black as the steeds of night 

Was seen to pass, as with eagle flight ; 

As if he knew the terrible need, 

He stretched away with his utmost speed ; 

Hills rose and fell ; but his heart was gay, 

With Sheridan fifteen miles away. 

Still sprung from those swift hoofs, thundering South, 

The dust, like smoke from the cannon's mouth, 

Or the trail of a comet, sweeping faster and faster, 

Foreboding to traitors the doom of disaster. 

The heart of the steed and the heart of the master 



SELECTIONS. 127 

Were beating like prisoners assaulting their walls, 
Impatient to be where the battle-field calls ; 
Every nerve of the charger was strained to full play, 
With Sheridan only ten miles away. 

Under his spurning feet the road 

Like an arrowy Alpine river flowed. 

And the landscape sped away behind 

Like an ocean flying before the wmd, 

And the steed, like a barque fed with furnace ire. 

Swept on, with his wild eye full of fire. 

But lo ! he is nearing his heart's desire ; 

He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray. 

With Sheridan only five miles away. 

The first that the Generarsaw were the groups 

Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops, 

What was done ? what to do ? — a glance told him both ; 

Then striking his spurs with a terrible oath. 

He dashed down the line, 'mid a storm of huzzas. 

And the wave of retreat checked its course there, because 

The sight of the master compelled it to pause. 

With foam and with dust the black charger was gray ; 

By the flash of his eye, and his red nostrd's play, 

He seems to the whole great army to say : 

" I have brought you Sheridan all the way 

From Winchester down to save the day ! " 

Hurrah, hurrah for Sheridan ! 

Hurrah, hurrah for horse and man ! 

And when their statues are placed on high. 

Under the dome of the Union sky, — 

The American soldiers.' Temple of Fame, — 

There with the glorious General's name 

Be it said in letters both bold and bright : 

" Here is the steed that saved the day 

By carrying Sheridan into the fight, 

From Winchester, — twenty miles away ! " 

— Thomas Buchanan Read. 



128 SELECTIONS. 

SCOTT AND THE VETERAN. 

[A/ny, 1861.^ 

An old and crippled veteran to the War Department came ; 
He sought the Chief who led him on many a field of fame — 
The Chief who shouted " Forward ! " where'er his banner rose, 
And bore its stars in triumph behind the flying foes. 

" Have you forgotten, General," the battered soldier cried, 

" The days of Eighteen Hundred Twelve, when I was at your side ? 

Have you forgotten Johnson, that fought at Lundy's Lane ? 

'Tis true I'm old and pensioned, but I want to fight again." 

" Have I forgotten ? " said the Chief ; "my brave old soldier, no ! 

And here's the hand I gave you then, and let it tell you so : 

But you have done your share, my friend ; you're crippled, old, and 

gray, 
And we have need of younger arms and fresher blood to-day." 

" put. General," cried the veteran, a flush upon his brow, 
" The very men who fought with us, they say, are traitors now ; 
They've torn the flag of Lundy's Lane — our old red, white and blue ; 
And while a drop of blood is left, Lll show that drop is true. 

" Lm not so weak but I can strike, and I've a good old gun 
To get the range of traitors' hearts, and pick them, one by one. 
Your Minie rifles, and such arms, it a'n't worth while to try ; 
I couldn't get the hang o' them, but I'll keep my powder dry ! " 

"God bless you, comrade ! " said the Chief ; " God bless your loyal 

heart ! 
But 3'ounger men are in the field, and claim to have their part ; 
They'll plant our sacred banner in each rebellious town. 
And woe, henceforth, to any hand that dares to pull it down ! " 

" But, General " — still persisting, the weeping veteran cried, 

" I'm young enough to follow, so long as your my guide ; 

And some, you know, must bite the dust, and that, at least can I, — 

So give the young ones place to fight, but me a place to die ! 

" If they should fire on Pickens, let the colonel in command 
Put me upon the rampart, with the flag-staff in my hand : 
No odds how hot the cannon-smoke, or how the shells may fly ; 
I'll hold the Stars and Stripes aloft, and hold them till I die ! 



SELECTIONS. 1 29 

" I'm ready, General, so you let a post to me be given, 
Where Washington can see me, as he looks from highest heaven, 
And say to Putnam at his side, or, may be. General Wayne : 
' There stands old Billy Johnson, that fought at Lundy's Lane ! ' 

"And when the fight is hottest, before the traitors fly. 

When shell and ball are screeching and bursting in the sky, 

If any shot should hit me, and lay me on my face, 

My soul would go to Washington's and not to Arnold's place ! " 

— Bayard Taylor. 



TENTING ON THE OLD CAMP-GROUND. 

We are tenting to-night on the old camp-ground, 

Give us a song to cheer 
Our weary hearts, a song of home 

And friends we love most dear. 

Chorus — Many are the hearts that are weary to-night. 
Wishing for the war to cease, 
Many are the hearts looking for the right. 

To see the dawn of peace. 
Tenting to-night, tenting to-night. 
Tenting on the old camp-ground. 

We've been tenting to-night on the old camp-ground. 

Thinking of days gone by, 
Of the loved ones at home, that gave us the hand, 

And the tear that said good-by. — Chorus. 

We are tired of war on the old camp-ground. 

Many are dead and gone. 
Of the brave and true who left their homes — 

Others been wounded long. — Chorus. 

We've been fighting to-day on the old camp-ground. 

Many are lying near ; 
Some are dead, and some are dying. 

Many are in tears. 

Chorus — Dying to-night, etc. 



I ^O SELECTIONS. 



THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER. 

Oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, 

What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming, 
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight, 

O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming ' 
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air. 

Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there. 
Oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave 

O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave ? 

On the shore dimly seen thro' the mists of the deep. 

Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, 
What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep. 

As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses ? 
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, 

In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream ; 
'Tis the star-spangled banner : oh, long may it wave 

O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. 

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore. 

That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion, 
A home and a country should leave us no more ? 

Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution. 
No refuge could save the hireling and slave 

From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave : 
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave 

O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. 

Oh, thus be it ever when freeman shall stand 

Between their loved homes and wild war's desolation ; 
Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land 

Praise the pow'r that hath made and preserved us a nation ! 
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just. 

And this be our motto : " In God is our trust ! " 
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave 

O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. 



SELECTIONS. I3I 



THE SWORD OF BUNKER HILL. 

He lay upon his dying bed ; 

His eye was growing dim, 
When with a feeble voice he called 

His weeping son to him : 
" Weep not, my boy ! " the vet'ran said, 

I bow to Heaven's high will — 
But quickly from yon antlers bring 

The Sword of Bunker Hill ; 
But quickly from yon antlers bring 

The Sword of Bunker Hill." 

The sword was brought, the soldier's eye 

Lit with a sudden flame ; 
And as he grasped the ancient blade, 

He murmured Warren's name : 
Then said, " My boy, I leave you gold — 

But what is richer still, 
I leave you, mark me, mark me now — 

The Sword of Bunker Hill ; 
I leave you, mark me, mark me now — 

The Sword of Bunker Hill. 

" 'Twas on that dread, immortal day, 
I dared the Briton's band, 
A captain raised this blade on me — 

I tore it from his hand : 
And while the glorious battle raged 

It lightened freedom's will — 
For, boy, the God of freedom blessed 

The Sword of Bunker Hill ; 
For, boy, the God of freedom blest 

The Sword of Bunker Hill. 

" O, keep the sword ! " — his accents broke — 
A smile — and he was dead — 
But his wrinkled hand still grasped the blade. 
Upon that dying bed. 



132 ' SELECTIONS. 

The son remains ; the sword remains — 
Its glory growing still — 

And twenty millions bless the sire 
And Sword of Bunker Hill ; 

And twenty millions bless the sire 
And Sword of Bunker Hill. 



THE BATTLE-CRY OF FREEDOM. 
(rallying song.) 

Yes, we'll rally round the flag, boys, we'll rally once again. 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 
We will rally from the hillside, we'll gather from the plain. 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 

Chorus — The Union forever, hurrah ! boys, hurrah ! 

Down with the traitor, up with the star, 
While we rally round the flag, boys, rally once again. 
Shouting the battle-cry of freedom ! 

We are springing to the call of our brothers gone before, ■ 

Shquting the battle-cry of freedom, 
And we'll fill the vacant ranks with a million freemen more. 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 

Chorus — The Union forever, etc. 

We will welcome to our numbers the loyal, true and brave. 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 
And altho' he may be poor he shall never be a slave. 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 

Chorus — The Union forever, etc. 

So we're springing to the call from the East and from the West, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom, 
And we'll hurl the rebel crew from the land we love the best, 

Shouting the battle-cry of freedom. 

Chorus — The Union forever, etc. 



SELECTIONS. 1 33 



THE COMMON CHORD. 

The Rappahannock's stately tide, aglow with sunset light. 

Came sweeping down between the hills that hemmed its gathering 

might ; 
From one side rose the Stafford slopes, and on the other shore 
The Spottsylvania meadows lay, with oak groves scattered o'er. 
Hushed were the sounds of busy day ; the brooding air was hushed, 
Save for the rapid-flowing stream that chanted as it rushed. 
O'er mead and gently-sloping hills, on either side the stream, 
The white tents of the soldiers caught the sun's departing beam — 
On Spottsylvania's slopes the Blue, on Stafford's hills the Gray ; 
•Between them like an unsheathed sword, the glittering river lay. 
Hark! suddenly a Union band far down the stream sends forth 
The strains of " Hail Columbia," the ptean of the North. 
The tents are parted ; silent throngs of soldiers, worn and grim, 
Stand forth upon the dusky slopes to hear the martial hymn. 
So clear and quiet was the night that to the farthest bound 
Of either camp was borne the swell of sweet triumphant sound. 
And when the last note died away, from distant post to post 
A shout like thunder of the tide rolled through the Federal host. 
Then straightway from the other shore there rose an answering strain, 
" Bonnie Blue Flag" came floating down the slope and o'er the plain. 
And then the Boys in Gray sent back our cheer across the tide — 
A mighty shout that rent the air and echoed far and wide. 
" Star Spangled Banner," we replied ; they answered, " Boys in Gray," 
While cheer on cheer rolled through the dusk, and faintly died away. 
Deeply the gloom had gathered round, and all the stars had come. 
When the Union band began to play the notes of " Home, Sweet 

Home." 
Slowly and softly breathed the chords, and utter silence fell 
Over the valley and the hills — on Blue and Gray as well. 
Now swelling, now sinking low, now tremulous, now strong. 
The leader's cornet played the air of the beautiful old song ; 
And rich and mellow, horn and bass joined in the flowing chords. 
So voice-like that they scarcely lacked the charm of spoken words. 
Then what a cheer from both the hosts, with faces to the stars ! 
And tears were shed, and prayers were said, upon the field of Mars. 
The Southern band caught up the strain ; and we, who could sing, 

sanjr. 



134 SELECTIONS. 

Oh ! what a glorious hymn of home across the river rang. 

We thought of loved ones far away, of scenes we'd left behind — 

The low-roofed farm-house 'neath the elm that murmured in the 

wind ; 
The children standing by the gate, the dear wife in the door ; 
Oh ! loud and long the cheer we raised, when silence fell again, 
And died away among the hills the dear familiar strain. 
Then to our cots of straw we stole, and dreamed the livelong night 
Of far-off hamlets in the hills, peace-walled, and still, and white. 

— James Biickhani. 



A WARRIOR BOLD. 

In days of old, when Knights were bold. 

And Barons held their sway, 
A warrior bold, with spurs of gold, 

Sang merrily his lay, — 

" My love is young and fair 

My love hath golden hair. 

And eyes of blue, and heart so true, 
That none with her compare. 

So what care I, tho' death be nigh, 

I'll live for love, or die." 

So this brave Knight, in armor bright, 

Went gaily to the fray. 
He fought the fight, but ere the night 

His soul had pass'd away. 
The plighted ring he wore 
Was crush'd and wet with gore. 

Yet ere he died, he bravely cried, — 
" I've kept the vow I swore. 

So what care I, tho' death be nigh, 

I've fought for love, and die." 



SELECTIONS. ^35 



"YES, IM GUILTY." 

" Yes, I am guilty," the prisoner said, 

As he wiped his eyes and bowed his head. 
" Guilty of all the crimes you name ; 
But this yere lad is not to blame. 
'Twas I alone who raised the row. 
And, Judge, if yer please, I'll tell yer how. 
You see, this boy is pale and slim ; 
We calls him saint— his name is Tim- 
He's like a preacher in his ways :— 
He never drinks, or swears, or plays, 
But kinder sighs and weeps all day ;— 
'Twould break your heart to hear him pray. 
Why, sir, many and many a night, 
When grub was scarce and I was tight, 
No food, no fire, no light to see. 
When home was hell, if hell there be, 
I've seen that boy in darkness kneel 
And pray such words as cut like steel ; 
Which somehow warmed and lit the room. 
And sorter chased away the gloom. 
Smile if you must, but facts are facts, 
And deeds are deeds and acts are acts ; 
And though I'm black as sin can be. 
His prayers have done a heap for me, 
And make me think that God, perhaps, 
Sent him on earth to save us chaps. 
This man what squealed and pulled us in. 
He keeps a place called Fiddlers' Inn, 
Where fakes, and snides, and lawless scamps 
Connive and plot with thieves and tramps. 
Well, Tim and me, we didn't know 
Just what to do, or where to go, 
And so we stayed with him last night, 
And this is how we had the fight : 
They wanted Tim to take a drink, 
But he refused, as you may thmk, 
And told them how the flowing bowl 
(Contained the fire that killed the soul. 



136 SELECTIONS. 

' Drink ! Drink ! ' they cried, 'this foaming beer ; 
'Twill make you strong and give you cheer. 
Let preachers groan and prate of sin. 
But give to us the flowing gin ! ' 
Then Tim knelt down beside his chair, 
And offered up this little prayer : 

' Help me, dear Lord,' the child began. 
As down his cheeks the big tears ran, 

' To keep the pledge I gave to you. 
And make me strong, and good, and true. 
I've done my best to do what's right. 
But, Lord, I'm sad and weak to-night. 
Father, mother, oh plead for me — 
Tell Christ I long with you to be ! ' 
'Get up, you brat, don't pray 'round here,' 
The landlord yelled with rage and fear. 
Then like a brute he hit the lad, 
Which made my blood just b'iling mad. 
I guess I must uv hurt his head. 
For I struck hard for the man that's dead. 
No, he hain't no folks or friends but me : 
His dad was killed in sixty-three : 
Shot at the front, where bursting shell 
And cannon sang their song of hell, 
And muskets hissed with fiery breath. 
As brave men fell to their tune of death. 
I promised his father before he died. 
As the life-blood rushed from his wounded side, 
I promised him, sir, and it gave him joy, 
That I'd protect his darling boy. 
I simply did what his father would. 
And helped the weak, as all men should. 
Yes, I knockd him down and blacked his eye. 
And used him rough I'll not deny ; 
But thmk of it. Judge, a chap like him 
Striking the likes of little Tim. * 

If I did wrong send me below, 
But spare the son of comrade Joe. — 
You forgive him ; and me ? Oh, no ! 
A fact ? God bless you ! Come, Tim, let's go." 

— J. M. Mtinyon. 



SELECTIONS. 1 37 

OUR TWO OPINIONS. 

Us two wuz boys when we fell out — 

Nigh to the age uv my youngest now ; 
Don't rec'lect what 'twuz about, 

Some small diff'rence, I'll allow. 
Lived ne.\t neighbors twenty years 

A-hatin" each other, me an' Jim — 
He havin' his opinyin uv me 

'Nd I havin' my opinyin uv him ! 

Grew up together 'nd wouldn't speak, 

Courted sisters, 'nd marr'd 'em, too ; 
Tended same meetin'-house onct a week, 

A-hatin' each other, through an' through ! 
But when Abe Linkern asked the West 

F'r soldiers, we answered — me an' Jim- — 
He havin' his opinyin uv me 

'Nd I havin' my opinyin uv him ! 

But down in Tennessee one night 

Ther wuz sound uv firin' our way. 
And the sergeant allowed ther'd be a fight 

With the Johnnie Rebs some time nex' day ; 
'Nd as I wuz thinkin' uv Lizzie 'nd home 

Jim stood afore me, long 'nd slim — 
He havin' his opinyin uv me 

'Nd 1 havin' my opinyin uv him ! 

Seemed like we knew there wuz goin' to be 

Serious trouble f'r me "nd him — 
Us two shuck hands, did Jim 'nd me, 

But never a word from me or Jim ! 
He went his way 'nd I went mine, 

'Nd into the battle's roar went we — 
He havin' his opinyin uv me 

'Nd I havin' my opinyin uv him ! 

Jim never came back from the war again, 

But I hain't forgot that last, last night, 
When, waitin' f'r orders, us two men 

Made up 'nd shuck hands, afore the fight ; 



138 SELECTIONS. 

'Nd after all, its soothin' to know 

That here I be 'nd yonder's Jim- 
He havin' his opinyin uv me 

'Nd I havin' my opinyin uv him ! 



A M E R I C A. 



My country ! 'tis of thee, 
Sweet land of Liberty, 

Of thee I sing : 
Land where my fathers died ! 
Land of the pilgrims' pride ! 
From every mountain side 

Let freedom ring ! 

My native country, thee, 
Land of the noble, free, 

Thy name I love ; 
I love thy rocks and rills. 
Thy woods and templed hills 
My heart with rapture thrills 

Like that above. 

Let music swell the breeze. 
And ring from all the trees 

Sweet freedom's song : 
Let mortal tongues awake ; 
Let all that breathe partake ; 
Let rocks their silence break 

The sound prolong. 

Our fathers' God ! to thee, 
Author of liberty, 

To thee we sing : 
Long may our land be bright 
With freedom's holy light ; 
Protect us by thy might. 

Great God, our King ! 



SELECTIONS. ^39 



ODE FOR DECORATION-DAY. 

Bring flowers to strew again 
With fragrant purple rain 
Of lilacs, and of roses white and red, 
The dwellings of our dead, our glorious dead ! 
Let the bells ring a solemn funeral chime, 
And wild war-music bring anew the time 
When they who sleep beneath 
Were full of vigorous breath. 
And in their lusty manhood sallied forth, 
Holding in strong right hand 
The fortunes of the land. 
The pride and power and safety of the North ! 
It seems but yesterday 
The long and proud array- 
But yesterday when even the solid rock 
Shook as with earthquake shock, — 
As North and South, like two huge icebergs, ground 
Against each other with convulsive bound. 
And the whole world stood still 
To view the mighty war, 
And hear the thundrous roar, 
While sheeted lightnings wrapped each plain and hill 

Alas ! how few came back 

From battle and from wrack ! 

Alas ! how many lie 

Beneath a Southern sky, 

Who never heard the fearful fight was done. 

And all they fought for won. 

Sweeter, I think, their sleep, 

More peaceful and more deep, 

Could they but know their wounds were not in vam. 

Could they but hear the grand triumphal strain. 

And see their homes unmarred by hostile tread. 

Ah ! let us trust it is so with our dead — 



I40 SELECTIONS. 

That they the thrilling joy of triumph feel, 
And in that joy disdain the foeman's steel. 
We mourn for all, but each doth think of one 

More precious to the heart than aught beside — 
Some father, brother, husband, or some son 

Who came not back, or coming, sank and died : 

In him the whole sad list is glorified ! 
" He fell 'fore Richmond, in the seven long days 

When battle raged from morn till blood-dewed eve, 
And lies there," one pale widowed mourner says, 

And knows not most to triumph or to grieve. 
" My boy fell at Fair Oaks," another sighs ; 
'■ And mine at Gettysburg ! " his neighbor cries, 

And that great name each sad-eyed listener thrills. 
I think of one who vanished when the press 
Of battle surged along the Wilderness, 

And mourned the North upon her thousand hills. 



gallant brothers of the generous South, 
Foes for a day and brothers for all time ! 

1 charge you by the memories of our youth, 

By Yorktown's field and Montezuma's clime, 
Hold our dead sacred — let them quietly rest 
In your unnumbered vales, where God thought best ! 
Your vines and flowers learned long since to forgive, 
And o'er their graves a 'broidered mantle weave ; 
Be you as kind as they are, and the word 
Shall reach the Northland with each summer bird. 
And thoughts as sweet as summer shall awake 
Responsive to your kindness, and shall make 
Our peace the peace of brothers once again. 
And banish utterly the days of pain. 



And ye, O Northmen ! be ye not outdone 

In generous thought and deed. 
We all do need forgiveness, every one ; 

And they that give shall find it in their need 



SELECTIONS. I4I 

Spare of your flowers to deck the stranger's grave, 

Who died for a lost cause : 
A soul more daring, resolute, and brave 

Ne'er won a world's applause ! 
(A brave man's hatred pauses at the tomb.) 
For him some Southern home was robed in gloom, 
Some wife or mother looked with longing e3''es 
Through the sad days and nights with tears and sighs, — 
Hope slowly hardening into gaunt Despair. 
Then let your foeman's grave remembrance share ; 
Pity a higher charm to Valor lends, 
And in the realms of Sorrow all are friends. 
Yes, bring fresh flowers and strew the soldier's grave, 

Whether he proudly lies 

Beneath our Northern skies. 
Or where the Southern palms their branches wave ! 
Let the bells toll and wild war-music swell, 

And for one day the thought of all the past — 

Of all those memories vast — 
Come back and haunt us with its mighty spell ! 
Bring flowers, then, once again. 
And strew with fragrant rain 
Of lilacs, and of roses white and red, 
The dwellings of our dead. 



SPEED AWAY. 



Speed away ! speed away ! on thine errand of light ! 
There's a young heart awaiting thy coming to-night ; 
She will fondle thee close, she will ask for the lov'd, 
Who pine upon earth since the " Day Star " has roved ; 
She will ask if we miss her, so long is her stay : 
Speed away ! speed away ! speed away ! 

And, oh ! wilt thou tell her, blest bird on the wing. 
That her mother hath ever a sad song to sing ; 
That she standeth alone, in the still quiet night. 
And her fond heart goes forth for the being of light, 
Who had slept in her liosom, but who would not stay ? 
Speed away ! speed away I speed away ! 



142 SELECTIONS. 

Go, bird of the silver wing, fetterless now, 

Stoop not thy bright pinions on yon mountain's brow ; 

But hie thee away, o'er rock, river, and glen. 

And find our young " Day Star " ere night close again ; 

Up ! onward ! let nothing thy mission delay : 

Speed away ! speed away ! speed away ! 



THE OLD OAKEN BUCKET. 

How dear to this heart are the scenes of my childhood, 

When fond recollection presents them to view ! 
The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled wildwood. 

And ev'ry loved spot which my infancy knew, 
The wide-spreading pond, and the mill that stood by it. 

The bridge and the rock where the cataract fell ; 
The cot of my father, the dairy-house nigh it. 

And e'en the rude bucket that hung in the well — 
The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound bucket. 
The moss-cover'd bucket that hung in the well. 

That moss-covered bucket I hailed as a treasure, 

For often at noon, when returned from the field, 
I found it the source of an exquisite pleasure, 

The purest and sweetest that nature can yield. 
How ardent I seized it, with hands that were glowing, 

And quick to the white-pebbled bottom it fell ; 
Then soon, with the emblem of -truth overflowing. 

And dripping with coolness, it rose from the well — 
The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound bucket. 
The moss-covered bucket arose from the well. 

How sweet from the green, mossy brim to receive it. 

As, poised on the curb, it inclined to my lips ! 
Not a full-blushing goblet could tempt me to leave it, 

Tho' filled with the nectar that Jupiter sips. 
And now, far removed from the loved habitation, 

The tear of regret will intrusively swell. 
As fancy reverts to my father s plantation. 

And sighs for the bucket that hung in the well — 
The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound bucket, 
The moss-covered bucket which hangs in the well. 



SELECTIONS. 143 



ANNIE LAURIE. 



Maxwelton's braes are bonnie, 
Where early fa's the dew, 

And 'twas there that Annie Laurie, 
Gave me her promise true, 
Gave me her promise true, 

Which ne'er forgot will be, 
And for bonnie Annie Laurie, 

I'd lay me down and dee. 

Her brow is like the snawdrift, 
Her throat is like the swan ; 

Her face it is the fairest 
That e'er the sun shone on, 
That e'er the sun shone on, 

And dark-blue is her e'e, 

And for bonnie Annie Laurie, 

I'd lay me down and dee. 

Like dew on th' gowan lying 
Is th' fa' o' her fairy feet. 

And like winds in summer sighing. 
Her voice is low and sweet. 
Her voice is low and sweet. 

And she's a' the world to me. 
And for bonnie Annie Laurie, 

I'd lay me down and dee. 



BANTY TIM ; 

OR, 

TiLMON Joy's Remarks to the White Man's Committee 
AT Spunky Point, Illinois. 

I reckon I get your drift, gents, 

You 'low the boy shan't stay. 

This is a white man's kentry, 

An' you're Dimocrats, you say ; 

An' whereas, and seein', an' wherefore. 

The times bein' all out o' jint, 

The nigger has got to mosey 

From the limits of Spunky Pint. 



144 SELECTIONS. 

Wall ! let's reason the thing a minit ; 
I'm an old-fashioned Dimocrat, too, 
But I laid my politics out of the way, 
To keep till the war was thro'. 
An' I kim back hefe allowin' 
To vote as I used to do. 
But it gravels me like the devil to train 
Along with sich fools as you. 

And, dog my cats, if I kin see 

In all the light o' day 

What you've got to do with the question 

If Tim shall go or stay ; 

An' furder than that I gives notis 

That if one on you teches the boy 

You may check your trunks for a warmer clime 

Than you'll find in Illinois. 

Why, blame your hearts, jest hear me : 

I remember tha^t ungodly day 

When our left struck Vicksburgh Heights, 

How ripped, an' torn, an' tattered we lay. 

When the rest retreated I stayed behind, 

Fur reasons sufficient fur me — 

A rib caved in an' a leg on a strike, 

As I sprawled on that damned glacee. 

Lord ! how the hot sun went fur us. 

An' boiled, an' blistered, an' burned ! 

How the rebel bullets whizzed 'round us. 

When a cuss in his death grip turned ! 

Till along towards dusk I seen a thing 

I couldn't believe fur a spell, 

But that nigger, that Tim, was a crawlin' fur me 

Thro' a fire-proof, gilt-edge hell ! 

The rebels seen him as quick as me. 

An' the bullets buzzed like bees, 

But he gave a jump an' shouldered me 

Tho' a shot brought him once to his knees ; 

An' he packed me up an' kerried me off. 

With a dozen stumbles an' falls,' 

Till he dropped us both in the Union lines, 

His black hide riddled with balls ! 



SELECTIONS. I45 

So, my gentle gazelles, thar's me answer. 

An' here stays Banty Tim ; 

He trumped Death's ace that day for me. 

An' I'm not going back on hnii. 

You may resoloot till the cows come home, 

But if one on ye teches the boy, 

You will wrastle your hash to-night in hell ! 

Or my name ain't Tilmon Joy. 



IN DE LOUISIANA LOWLANDS. 

Way down in Louisiana, not many years ago. 

There lived a color'd ge'man, his name was Pompey Snow. 

He played upon de banjo, and on de tambourine. 

And for rattling ob de bones, he was the greatest eber seen. 

Chorus. — In de Louisiana lowlands, lowlands, lowlands, 
In de Louisiana lowlands, low. 

One night old Pompey started off to play for Caesardum, 
But afore he went he fortified with a good stout glass of rum. 
When on de road he thought he saw a darkey, tall and grim, 
So Pompey laid de banjo down to break de darkey's shin. 

Cho. — In de Louisiana lowlands, etc. 

Says he, " Old chap, just move along, or else I'll spoil your face." 
But dis darkey didn't seem to move from out his hiding-place. 
So drawing back, he crooked his head and drove at him cachunk. 
But Pompey made a sad mistake, for 'twas nothing but a stump. 

Cho. — In de Louisiana lowlands, etc. 

De stump it proved a little hard, too hard for Pompey's wool. 

For when he struck, de hickory knot went through the darkey's skull. 

Dey found his banjo by his side, and Pompey lying dead — 

Spoken : And, ladies and gentlemen, dis is de first time upon 
record dat it was ever known of a darkey's ever coming to his death — 
By de breaking of his head. 

Cho. — In de Louisiana lowlands, etc. 



146 SELECTIONS. 

KINGDOM COMING. 

Say, darkeys, hab you seen de massa, 

Wid de muffstash on his face, 
Go long de road some time dis mornin', 

Like he gwine to leab de place ? 
He seen a smoke, way up de ribber, 

Whar de Linkum gumboats lay ; 
He took his hat, an' lef berry sudden, 

An' I spec he's run away ! 

Chorus — De massa run — ha, ha ! 

De darkey stay — ho, ho ! 
It mus' be now de kingdom comin', 
An' de year ob jubilo ! 

He six foot one way, two foot tudder, 

An' he weigh tree hundred pound, 
His coat so big, he couldn't pay de tailor. 

An' it won't go half way round. 
He drill so much dey call him cap'an, 

An' he get so drefful tann'd, 
I spec he try an' fool dem Yankees 

For to tink he's contraband. 

De darkeys feel so lonesome libing 

In de log-house on the lawn, 
Dey move dar tings to massa's parlor, 

For to keep it while he's gone. 
Dar's wine an' cider in de kitchen, 

An' de darkeys dey'll hab some ; 
I spose dey'll all be cornfiscated 

When de Linkum sojers come. 

De oberseer he make us trouble. 

An' he dribe us round a spell ; 
We lock him up in de smoke-house cellar, 

Wid de key trown in de well. 
De whip is lost, de han'cuff broken, 

But de massa '11 hab his pay ; 
He's ole enough, big enough, ought to know better 

Dan to went an' run away. 



SELECT[ONS. I47 



OLD FOLKS AT HOME. 

Way down on the Swanee ribber, 

Far, far away, 
Dere's whar my heart is turning ebber, 

Dere's whar de old folks stay. 
And up and down the whole creation, 

Sadly I roam ; 
Still longing for de old plantation. 

And for de old folks at home. 

All de world am sad and dreary, 

Ebry where I roam ; 
Oh ! darkeys, how my heart grows weary. 

Far from de old folks at home. 

All round de little farm 1 wandered. 

When I was young ; 
Den many happy days I squandered. 

Many de songs I sung. 
When I was playing with my brudder, 

Happy was I ; 
Oh ! take me to my kind old mudder, 

Dere let me live and die. 

All de world am sad and dreary, etc. 

One little hut among de bushes. 

One dat I love, 
Still sadly to my memory rushes. 

No matter where I rove. 
When will I see de bees a humming. 

All round de comb ? 
When will I hear de banjo tumming, 

Down in my good old home ? 

All de world am sad and dreary, etc. 



148 SELECTIONS. 



HOME, SWEET HOME. 

'Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam, 
Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home ; 
A charm from the skies seems to hallow us there. 
Which, seek thro' the world, is ne'er met with elsewhere. 

Home, home, sweet, sweet home. 
There's no place like home. 
Oh, there's no place like home. 

I gaze on the moon as I tread the drear wild, 

And feel that my mother now thinks of her child ; 

As she looks on that moon from our own cottage door. 

Thro' the woodbine whose fragrance shall cheer me no more. 

Home, home, sweet, sweet home. 
There's no place like home, 
Oh, there's no place like home. 

An exile from home, splendor dazzles in vain ; 
Oh, give me my lowly thatched cottage again ; 
The birds singing gaily, that came at my call ; 
Give me them, and that peace of mind, dearer than all. 

Home, home, sweet, sweet home, 
There's no place like home, 
Oh, there's no place like home. 



WHAT ARE THE Wn.D WAVES SAYING? 

What are the wild waves saying, sister, the whole day long, 

That ever, amid our playing, I hear but their low, lone song ? 

Not by the sea-side only, there it sounds wild and free ; 

But at night, when 'tis dark and lonely, in dreams it is still with me. 

Brother ! I hear no singing ! "tis but the rolling waves. 

Ever its lone course winging over some ocean cave ! 

'Tis but the noise of water, dashing against the shore, 

And the wind from some bleaker quarter mingling with its roar. 

No ! no, it is something greater that speaks to the heart alone, 

The voice of the great Creator dwells in that mighty tone ! 



SELECTIONS. I49 

Yes ! but the waves seem ever singing the same sad thing ; 

And vain is my weak endeavor to guess what the surges sing ! 

What is that voice repeating, ever by night and day ? 

Is it a friendly greeting, or a warning that calls away ? 

Brother ! the inland mountain, hath it not voice and sound ? 

Speaks not the dripping fountain, as it bedews the ground ? 

E'en by the household ingle, curtain'd and clos'd and warm, 

])o not our voices mingle with those of the distant storm ? 

Yes ! but there is something greater that speaks to the heart alone, 

The voice of the great Creator dwells in that mighty tone ! 



THE JINERS. 

She was about forty-five years old, well dressed, had black hair, 
rather thin and tinged with gray, and eyes in which gleamed the 
fires of a determination not easily balked. She walked into the 
Mayor's office and requested a private interview, and having obtained 
it, and satisfied herself that the law students were not listening at 
the keyhole, said slowly, solemnly, and impressively : 

" I want a divorce." 

" \\hat for? I supposed you had one of the best of husbands," 
said the Mayor. 

" I s'pose that's what everybody thinks ; but if they knew what 
I've suffered in ten years, they'd wonder I hadn't scalded him long 
ago. I ought to, but for the sake of the young ones I've borne it 
and said nothing. I've told him, though, what he might depend on, 
and now the time's come ; I won't stand it, young ones or no young 
ones. I'll have a divorce, and if the neighbors want to blab them- 
selves hoarse about it they can, for I won't stand it another day." 

" But what's the matter ? Don't your husband provide for you ? 
Don't he treat you kindly ? " pursued the Mayor. 

" We get victuals enough, and I don't know but he's as true and 
kind as men in general, and he's never knocked any of us down. I 
wish he had ; then I'd get him into jail, and know where he was of 
nights," retorted the woman. 

" Then what is your complaint against him ? " 

"Well, if you must know, he's one of them plaguey jiners." 

" A what ? " 

"A jiner — one of them pesky fools that's always jining some- 
thing. There can't nothing come along that's dark and sly and 



150 SELECTIONS. 

hidden but he jines it. If anybody should get up a society to burn 
his house down, he'd jine it just as soon as he could get in ; and if 
he had to pay for it he'd go all the suddener. We hadn't been 
married more'n two months before he jined the Know Nothin's, 
We lived on a farm then, and every Saturday night he'd come tear- 
ing in before supper, grab a fistful of nut cakes, and go off gnawing 
them, and that's the last I'd see of him till morning. And every 
other night he'd roll and tumble in his bed, and holler in his sleep, 
' Put none but Americans on guard — George Washmgton ; ' and 
rainy days he would go out in the corn-barn and jab at a picture of 
King George with an old bagnet that was there. I ought to put my 
foot down then, but he fooled me so with his lies that I let him go 
and encouraged him in it. 

"Then he jined the Masons. P'raps you know what them be, 
but I don't, 'cept they think they are of the same kind of critters 
that built Solomon's temple ; and of all the nonsense and gab about 
worshipful master and scjuare and compasses and sich like that we 
had in the house for the next six months, you never see the beat. 
And he's never outgrowed it nuther. What do you think of man, 
squire, that'll dress himself in a white apron, about big enough for 
a monkey's bib, and go marching up and down and making motions 
and talking foolish, lingo at a picture of (ieorge Washington in a 
green, jacket and an apron covered over with eyes and columns and 
other queer pictures? Ain't he a loonytick ? Well, that's my Sam, 
and I've stood it as long as I'm goin' to. 

" The next lunge the old fool made was into the Odd Fellows. 
I made it warm for him when he came home and told me he'd jined 
them, but he kinder pacified me by telling me they are a sort of 
branch show that took in women, and he'd get me in as soon as he 
found how to do it. Well, one night he come home and said I'd 
been proposed, and somebody had blackballed me. Did it himself, 
of course. Didn't want me arountl knowing about his goings on. 
Of course he didn't, and I told him so. 

"Then he jined the Sons of Malter. Didn't say nothing to me 
about It, but sneaked off one night, pretendin' he'd got to sit up 
with a sick Odd Fellow, and I never found it out, only he come 
home lookin' like a man who had been through a threshing machine, 
and I wouldn't do a thing for him until he owned up. And so its 
gone from bad to wus, jinin' this and that and t'other, till he's wor- 
ship minister of the Masons, and goodness of hope of the Odd 
Fellows, and sword swallower of the Finnegan's, and virgin cerus 



SELECTIONS. 151 

of the Grange, and grand Mogul of the Sons of Indolence, and 
two-edged tomahawk of the United Order of Red Men, and tale 
bearer of the Merciful Manikins, and skipper of the Guild Caratrine 
Columbus, and grand Oriental Bouncer of the Royal Arcaners, and 
big wizard of the Arabian Nights, and pledge passer of the Reform 
club, and chief bulger of the Irish Mechanics, and purse keeper of 
the Order of Canadian Conscience, and double-barrelled dictator 
of the Knights of the Brass Circles, and standard bearer of the 
Royal Archangels, and sublime porte of the Onion League, and chief 
butler of the Celestial Cherubs, and puissant potentate of the Pet- 
rified Pollywogs, and goodness only knows what else. I've borne it 
and borne it, hopin' he'd get 'em all jined after awhile, but 'tain't no 
use, and when he'd got into a new one, and been made grand guide 
of the Knights of Horror. I told him I'd quit and I will." 

Here the Mayor interrupted, saying : 

" Well, your husband is pretty well initiated, that's a fact ; but 
the court will hardly call that a good cause for divorce. The most 
of the societies you mention are composed of honorable men with 
excellent reputations. Many of them, though called lodges, are 
relief associations and mutual insurance companies, which, if your 
husband should die, would take care of you and would not see you 
suffer if you were sick." 

" See me suffer when I'm sick ! Take care of me when he's 
dead ! Well, I guess not ; I can take care of myself when he's 
dead, and if I can't I can get another ! There's plenty of em ! 
And they needn't bother themselves when I am sick either. If I 
want to be sick and suffer, it's none of their business, especially 
after all the suffering I've had when I ain't sick, because of their 
carryin's on. And you needn't try to make me believe it's all right, 
either. I know what it is to live with a man that jines so many 
lodges that he don't never lodge at home." 

"Oh, that's harmless amusement,'' quietly remarked the Mayor, 
"and if all that you say about your husband is really as you affirm, 
it affords strong proof that he must be a man endowed with an 
unusual amount of earnestness of purpose, as well as a large degree 
of popularity." 

She looked him scjuare in the eyes and said : " I believe you are 
a jiner yourself." 

He admitted that he was to a certain e.xtent, and she arose and 
said : "1 would not have thought it. A man like you, chairman of 
a Sabbath school, — it's enough to make a woman take pisen ! But 



152 SELECTIONS. 

I don't want anything of you. I want a lawyer that don't belong to 
nobody or nothin'." And she bolted out of the office to hunt up a 
man that wasn't a jiner. 



AULD LANG SYNE. 

Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And never brought to mind ? 
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And days of auld lang syne ? 
For auld lang syne, my dear, 

For auld lang syne ; 
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet 

For auld lang syne. 

We twa ha'e run aboot the braes, 

And pu'd the gowans fine ; 
But we've wander'd mony a weary foot 

Sin' auld lang syne. 
For auld lang syne, my dear. 

For auld lang syne ; 
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet 

For auld lang syne. 

We twa ha'e sported i' the burn 

Frae mornin' sun till dine, 
But seas between us braid ha'e roared 

Sin' auld lang syne. 
For auld lang syne, my dear, 

For auld lang syne ; 
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet 

For auld lang syne. 

And here's a hand, my trusty frien'. 

And gie's a hand o' thine ; 
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet 

For auld lang syne. 
For auld lang syne, my dear, 

For auld lang syne ; 
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet 

For auld lang syne. 



R 




^i^i:i>i)ili>il!ii^^^